COP26 reaches a revised agreement on the climate crisis, and the United Nations: It is not enough


COP26 reaches a revised agreement on the climate crisis, and the United Nations: It is not enough


The United Nations climate conference (COP-26) on Saturday approved a revised agreement aimed at keeping global warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius, while UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned that "the climate catastrophe is still present" despite the agreement.

Climate talks at COP-26 ended with a global agreement aimed at keeping global warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius 

The United Nations climate conference (COP-26) on Saturday approved a revised agreement after a last-minute amendment to the text of the agreement related to coal, prompting complaints from weak countries that wanted a more specific statement on ending fossil fuel subsidies.

The UN climate talks in Scotland (COP-26) ended with a global agreement aimed at at least keeping global warming at a level of 1.5 degrees Celsius, thus preserving a realistic chance of saving the world from the catastrophic effects of climate change.

Conference Chairman Alok Sharma said he "deeply regrets" the last-minute changes to the wording by conference participants with regard to coal.

Sharma's voice trembled after hearing from the weak countries that expressed their anger at the changes in the text of the agreement, and added, "I may just say to all delegations, I apologize for the way this process went and I am very sorry."

"I also understand the deep disappointment, but I think as you have noted, it is essential that we protect this deal," he said.

On Saturday evening, Sharma noted the lack of firm objections from nearly 200 delegates of the countries participating in the Glasgow conference, from the great powers that use coal and gas to oil producers to the Pacific islands threatened with disappearance due to rising water levels.

'Disaster still looming'
In contrast, United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned that "the climate catastrophe is still present" despite the agreement reached at the COP-26 climate conference in Glasgow.

Guterres said in a statement that the World Climate Conference ended with "welcome steps forward, but that is not enough." Glasgow had left for the headquarters of the International Organization in New York.

The agreement culminates in two-week negotiations, which were extended for one day on Friday, in order to strike a balance between the demands of climate-vulnerable countries and major industrial powers and those countries whose consumption or exports of fossil fuels are vital to their economic development.

Hours before the conference concluded, Sharma said, "Please don't ask yourselves what bigger (commitments) you can achieve, but ask instead what is enough, is this package balanced? Does it provide enough for all of us?"

"Most importantly, please ask yourselves if these texts are ultimately valid for all people and for our planet," he added.

A draft agreement circulated early Saturday acknowledged that current commitments to cut greenhouse gas emissions that are causing global warming are not enough anywhere, and asked countries to make tougher climate pledges next year, rather than every five years. It is currently required.

Scientists say that exceeding 1.5 degrees Celsius would lead to extreme sea level rise and disasters including severe droughts, powerful storms and wildfires that are far worse than those the world is already experiencing.

But pledges by countries so far to cut greenhouse gas emissions, mostly carbon dioxide from burning coal, oil and gas, will only limit the average global temperature rise to 2.4 degrees Celsius.

However, Saturday's draft published by the United Nations called for efforts to reduce coal consumption as well as massive subsidies by governments around the world to oil, coal and gas to power factories and heat homes, something that had not been agreed upon in any previous round of the UN Security Council. Conference.

India, whose energy needs depend largely on coal, has raised last-minute objections to this part of the deal.

Developing countries argue that rich countries, whose emissions have historically been largely responsible for global warming, should pay more to help them adapt and limit their effects.

Finance
The draft urged rich countries to double funding for climate adaptation by 2025 compared to 2019 levels, which was a key demand of the small island nations participating in the conference.

Britain said a UN panel next year should report on progress towards the $100 billion a year in total annual climate finance that rich countries pledged by 2020 but failed to commit.

She added that governments should meet in 2022, 2024 and 2026 to discuss climate finance.

The $100 billion per year allocation itself falls far short of the actual needs of poor countries, which could reach $300 billion by 2030 in adaptation costs alone, according to the United Nations, as well as economic losses from crop failure or climate-related disasters.
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