Including about 115,000 in a week, The United Nations confirms the displacement of 5.3 million Sudanese Including about 115,000 in a week, The United Nations confirms the displacement of 5.3 million Sudanese

Including about 115,000 in a week, The United Nations confirms the displacement of 5.3 million Sudanese

Including about 115,000 in a week, The United Nations confirms the displacement of 5.3 million Sudanese

The United Nations announced the displacement of about 115,000 Sudanese during the past week, noting that about 5.3 million people have fled their homes into Sudan or neighboring countries, since the beginning of the conflict between the two sides of the conflict last April.

The United Nations Office for Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) confirmed on Friday that more than 114,000 people were displaced during the past week in Sudan.

The United Nations Office stated in a report on developments in the humanitarian situation in Sudan that, with the continued fighting between the army and the Rapid Support Forces since last April, about 5.3 million people have fled their homes into the country or neighboring countries.

He explained: “Inside Sudan, more than 4.2 million people were displaced to 3,929 locations in all states.”

He added: "This includes about 114,700 people who were displaced during the past week alone."

The UN office revealed that "more than one million people crossed into neighboring countries, including Egypt, Ethiopia, Chad, South Sudan and Central Africa."

He pointed out that "the humanitarian appeal led by the United Nations suffers from a lack of funding, as it does not exceed about 31% of what is required."

On May 17, the United Nations and its humanitarian agencies launched an appeal to provide about $2.6 billion to finance the response plan to the humanitarian crisis in Sudan.

Since mid-April, the Sudanese army and the Rapid Support Forces have been engaged in clashes that a series of truces have not been able to stop, leaving more than three thousand dead, most of them civilians, according to the United Nations.




Sudan Al-Burhan and Hemedti exchange accusations in two speeches before the United Nations

The leaders of the two sides of the conflict in Sudan, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan and Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, exchanged accusations in two different speeches before the United Nations. While the army commander called for action against the supporters of the Rapid Support, the latter expressed his forces’ readiness for a ceasefire.

The leaders of the two sides of the conflict in Sudan, Abdel Fattah al-Burhan and Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, delivered two different speeches before the United Nations on Thursday, one from the podium at the organization’s headquarters in New York, and the other via a rare video recording from an unknown location.

The two sides exchanged accusations of responsibility for sparking the war that began in mid-April in Khartoum and moved to other regions of the country, including Darfur in the west, which led to the displacement of more than five million people and raised fears of destabilizing the region.

Sudanese Army Commander Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan called on the international community to classify the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces as a terrorist organization and to deal decisively with those who support them from outside Sudan’s borders.

Al-Burhan said in his speech: “We are still extending our hands for peace and to stop this war and alleviate the suffering of our people,” adding that the army is still committed to withdrawing from politics within the framework of the transition to civilian rule.

At the same time, he called for classifying the Rapid Support Forces and the militias allied with them as terrorist groups, and said that they are supported by regional and international bodies, without specifying any of them. Emphasizing the need to deal decisively with those who support it.


For his part, Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo “Hemedti,” commander of the Rapid Support Forces, said in a video recording that the forces are fully prepared for a ceasefire and to enter into comprehensive political talks to end the conflict with the army.

Hemedti appeared in military uniform, sitting at a desk reading his speech, with the Sudanese national flag behind him.

Hemedti renewed his commitment to a peaceful process to stop the war, and said that the Rapid Support Forces are fully prepared for a ceasefire throughout Sudan to allow the passage of humanitarian aid and launch serious and comprehensive political talks.

Saudi Arabia and the United States had previously sought to reach a permanent ceasefire in Sudan, but the process faltered amid parallel international initiatives from Africa and the Middle East.
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