A “smart mirror” predicts the time of death of the person standing in front of it and the risk of contracting chronic diseases A “smart mirror” predicts the time of death of the person standing in front of it and the risk of contracting chronic diseases

A “smart mirror” predicts the time of death of the person standing in front of it and the risk of contracting chronic diseases

A “smart mirror” predicts the time of death of the person standing in front of it and the risk of contracting chronic diseases

This week at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES), a leading artificial intelligence company unveiled a smart “mirror” capable of assessing the health of those standing in front of it.

The new health product, a 21.5-inch vertical tablet with a mounted camera, tracks more than 100 health signs by scanning blood flow beneath the surface of an individual's face.

The device promises to detect various health signs ranging from high blood pressure, to symptoms of fever, depression or mental health risks, and the 10-year risk of stroke, to “aging of facial skin.” It can also warn the user if he thinks he is about to die.

One telemedicine expert praised the device as "perfect for clinics and nursing homes."

The manufacturer hopes the device will help give people advance warning about the “proactive” medical care they need, offering the device not just to homes, but to retailers, gyms, schools, nursing homes and pharmacies as well.

NuraLogix revealed that its new device, called Anura MagicMirror, is designed to use a combination of sensors and artificial intelligence to scan vital signs and provide disease risk assessments.

The device includes a powerful internal optical sensor that collects data for analysis by a cloud-based algorithm.

The sensor, NuraLogix's patented Transdermal Optical Imaging (TOI) technology, uses a method already used in hospitals, technically known as Photoplethysmography, to record changes in blood volume within the tiny capillaries (tiny blood vessels) of facial tissue.

The blood flow data is then sent to the company's Affective AI platform, called DeepAffex, which “uses advanced signal processing and machine learning AI algorithms to calculate more than 100 health traits,” according to the company.

Speaking to Wired during Consumer Electronics (CES), NuraLogix CEO Marzio Pozzoli confirmed that the MagicMirror camera does not use any facial recognition technology.

However, not everyone was comfortable with these assertions, with a Washington Times columnist opining that “as with everything AI-related, the potential for harm lies close to the intended good.”

Regardless, NuraLogix's CEO said he expects MagicMirror to start as a product for business customers, installed in places like gyms, pharmacies, clinic waiting rooms, or even on construction sites where quick health assessments could mean life or death.

But, eventually, Pozzuoli hopes to see the MagicMirror become a common device for home health care.

According to Wired, Pozzuoli expects some measurements to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration this year, with more measurements to come.

According to the NuraLogix website, the MagicMirror device is not yet available for retail sale, but is “for investigative use only.”



A "strange device" that allows you to control computers using your tongue!

A "strange device" that allows you to control computers using your tongue!

Researchers unveiled a strange device that resembles a rubber shield at the CES technology conference in Las Vegas, allowing you to control devices with just the movement of your tongue.

The MouthPad was first revealed last year, but was shown off at CES this week.

The device can be synced via Bluetooth with a range of devices, including computers and smartphones. Once the device is connected, you can then control it with your tongue.

The MouthPad sends commands via Bluetooth to the connected device, translating them into cursor movements and clicks.

“We are not only reinventing the computer mouse, but we are reshaping the human experience,” said the company that founded the project, Augmental.

While the MouthPad was originally designed for people with quadriplegia and limited hand control, Augmental says its range extends beyond these conditions.

“The goal is to expand the MouthPad so that it can be used by as many people as possible, allowing people to carry out everyday tasks hands-free and enjoy digital control with greater ease and independence,” she added.
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