New York Times: Feminist salon bookstore quietly emerges in Shanghai New York Times: Feminist salon bookstore quietly emerges in Shanghai

New York Times: Feminist salon bookstore quietly emerges in Shanghai

New York Times: Feminist salon bookstore quietly emerges in Shanghai

Just as the Chinese government is promoting marriage and promoting traditional virtues , women in Shanghai and other cities are beginning to reflect on their own value and rights. The New York Times pointed out that they held salon discussions in bars and organized reading groups with women's themes, etc., while the authorities suppressed women's rights activities, and quietly found their own space.

Chinese women are quietly regaining their own identities and rights. They attend bar salons, film screenings, and visit bookstores that focus on women's issues and female creators. But according to the New York Times, these urban women in Shanghai have to be careful because if they use the word "feminism" or make their activities too popular, they may face suppression or ban by the government.

The report pointed out that the Chinese government views feminism as a threat. Not only are activists imprisoned, but support for sexual harassment and violence is also ignored or suppressed. Recently, in order to solve the problem of population shrinkage, the Beijing authorities have encouraged women to return to the family and have children. The new propaganda makes some women in China feel ashamed or self-denial because they are not married.

It was in this social atmosphere that Tang Shuang, the former deputy editor-in-chief of the Chinese version of the fashion magazine "Vogue", opened a women's bookstore "Paper Moon". Tang Shuang told the New York Times that the bookstore is divided into three major sections, in addition to feminist history, literature/poetry, and biography, because "there must be true stories to encourage women."

The "Her" bar opened during the COVID-19 epidemic is another example. Founder Du Wen told the New York Times that Chinese society now urgently needs some space to help women make friends and explore their social power and status; International Women's Day is celebrated on March 8 this year. On that day, a group of young women took action to oppose the definition of personal identity and value through marriage and love relationships, and made a vow to "marry yourself" in a bar. Du Wen pointed out that "her" existence has attracted the attention of local authorities, but local officials have hinted to her that Shanghai can allow such a space to exist as long as "she" does not become a popular location.

In addition, Shanghai's first women's bookstore "Xinchao Bookstore" announced in April this year that it would move into Shanghai Book City. Although the space has become smaller, with only one room and a few bookshelves, the owner expects that the new location will attract or contact more people. White-collar female readers.

According to the New York Times, Xia Wang, the founder of Kindness Bookstore, has planned six reading spaces named after famous feminist activists and authors such as Simone Beauvoir, but so far she has avoided identifying herself as feminist. According to The Paper, Xinchao Bookstore has transformed from a "women's space" to a "women's federation organization" in 2022 and established a women's federation. Wang Yan, chairman of the Shanghai Huangpu District Women's Federation, also came to the scene to congratulate.

6 Comments

  1. Just as the Chinese government is promoting marriage and

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  2. A feminist salon and bookstore emerged in Shanghai, offering women a space to discuss gender issues, while the Chinese government promotes marriage and traditional values. Despite government suppression of feminist activism, these spaces represent women's efforts to explore their identity and rights.





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  3. suppression of feminist activism, these spaces represent women's efforts to explore their identity and rights

    ReplyDelete
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