Tunisian opposition calls for a day of anger against the coup and parties condemn the finance decree Tunisian opposition calls for a day of anger against the coup and parties condemn the finance decree

Tunisian opposition calls for a day of anger against the coup and parties condemn the finance decree

Sudan protests dead and dozens wounded, and security prevents ambulances from arriving  The Sudanese Professionals Association announced the killing of 4 people and the injury of dozens in large-scale protests calling for the return of democratic civilian rule.  The Sudanese Professionals Association announced Thursday that 4 people were killed and a large number of wounded and injured as a result of the violent repression of the security forces, in protests denouncing the political agreement signed between the President of the Sovereign Council, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, and Prime Minister Abdullah Hamdok, and to demand the return of democratic civilian rule.  This came in a statement to the gathering on its Facebook page, in which it appealed to doctors to go quickly to Omdurman hospitals to provide assistance.  For its part, the Sudanese Ministry of Health said that the extent of the security forces' repression of the December 30 demonstration and the casualties in the city of Omdurman, west of the capital, Khartoum, "exceeded all imaginations."  "The security forces prevented ambulances from crossing to transport the injured and wounded participating in the demonstrations," the ministry added in a statement.  And it called on "all doctors and health cadres to go to the Al-Arbaeen Hospital in Omdurman, because the available medical staff was unable to provide service to all the injured, because the scale of repression and injuries exceeded all imaginations." The ministry did not mention the number and nature of injuries.  On Thursday, demonstrations called by the "Professionals Gathering" and the "resistance committees" began to denounce the political agreement signed between the President of the Sovereignty Council, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, and Prime Minister Abdullah Hamdok, and to demand the return of democratic civilian rule.  Since last October 25, Sudan has witnessed protests against the measures taken by Al-Burhan, including declaring a state of emergency, dissolving the Sovereignty and Transitional Ministers Councils, dismissing Hamdok, and arresting party leaders and officials.  Political and civil forces considered these measures a "military coup", in exchange for a denial by the army, which described them as "corrective".  On Wednesday and Thursday, the security authorities closed some bridges and streets in central Khartoum, with containers, barbed wire, and concrete barriers to prevent the arrival of demonstrators rejecting "military rule" to the vicinity of the presidential palace.  On November 21, Al-Burhan and Hamdok signed a political agreement that included the latter's return to his position, the formation of a government of competencies, the release of political prisoners, and the two parties' pledge to work together to complete the democratic path.  However, Sudanese political and civil forces consider the agreement an "attempt to legitimize the coup", and pledge to continue protests until full civilian rule is achieved during the transitional period.  Since August 21, 2019, the country has been in a transitional period that ends with elections in July 2023, during which power is shared by the army, civilian forces and armed movements that signed an agreement with the government to bring peace in 2020.    Tunisian opposition calls for a day of anger against the coup and parties condemn the finance decree  The "Citizens Against the Coup" initiative called for participation in a day of outrage against the coup, on the anniversary of the revolution, while opposition parties condemned the 2022 Finance Decree and considered it an "imminent danger."  The "Citizens Against the Coup" initiative called on Thursday in Tunisia to participate in a "day of outrage against the coup", on the anniversary of the upcoming January 14 revolution.  During a press conference in Tunis, a member of the initiative's executive body, Jawhar Ben Mubarak, urged the Tunisian people to "prepare for the upcoming January 14th, to be a day of true celebration of the revolution, and a day of outrage against the coup."  “Ibn Mubarak” means by the coup exceptional measures initiated by President Qais Saeed on July 25, including: freezing the powers of Parliament, holding early elections on December 17, 2022, abolishing the constitutionality monitoring body, issuing legislation by presidential decrees, and dismissing a president the government.  He warned "international financial institutions against engaging with the coup authority, dealing with them, and financing the state budget for the year 2022."  And he considered that the budget "included unfair and illegitimate financial measures whose meaning is to further impoverish the poor and burden the people."  He continued: "The Finance Law, which was established by the government of (Najla) Boden, is an embezzlement of public money and taxpayers' money. We reject all international and internal financial commitments made by the coup government."  Ayyad Al-Loumi, a member of the initiative, said: "We will present a case for those responsible for this budget, i.e. the head of state, the prime minister and the minister of finance," considering that "the current finance law will lead the country to bankruptcy and will deepen the economic crisis further."  Yousry Al-Dali, a member of the initiative, said that "the law is illegal, because, contrary to what the constitution stipulates, it was mentioned in a presidential decree and exceeded the legal deadlines."  As for the Afaq Tounes party, it described the law as "the greatest imminent danger" to the country.  The party (two deputies out of 217 in Parliament whose jurisdiction has been suspended) added in a statement that "this law is based on absorbing the efforts of Tunisians and incapacitating them by raising (increase) payments (taxes) on individuals and institutions."  It is also based on “protecting and encouraging the parallel economy, without announcing any real measures to restore the engines of the national economy represented in state development projects and internal and external investment to work,” according to the party.  The constitution stipulates that “the draft finance law shall be submitted to Parliament no later than 15 October, and it shall be ratified no later than 10 December of each year.”  On Tuesday, the government announced its budget for 2022, with an expected primary deficit of three billion dollars, equivalent to 6.7 percent of the country's gross domestic product.  The severity of economic and financial pressures on Tunisia has escalated as part of the repercussions of a severe political crisis that the country has been experiencing, since the start of Said's exceptional measures.  The majority of political forces in Tunisia reject these measures, and consider them a "coup against the constitution", while other forces support them and see them as a "correction of the course of the 2011 revolution", which on January 14 of that year overthrew the regime of then-President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.  Defending these measures, Saeed, who began a five-year presidential term in 2019, said that they are "measures within the framework of the constitution to protect the state from an imminent danger," according to his assessment.

Sudan protests dead and dozens wounded, and security prevents ambulances from arriving


The Sudanese Professionals Association announced the killing of 4 people and the injury of dozens in large-scale protests calling for the return of democratic civilian rule.

The Sudanese Professionals Association announced Thursday that 4 people were killed and a large number of wounded and injured as a result of the violent repression of the security forces, in protests denouncing the political agreement signed between the President of the Sovereign Council, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, and Prime Minister Abdullah Hamdok, and to demand the return of democratic civilian rule.

This came in a statement to the gathering on its Facebook page, in which it appealed to doctors to go quickly to Omdurman hospitals to provide assistance.

For its part, the Sudanese Ministry of Health said that the extent of the security forces' repression of the December 30 demonstration and the casualties in the city of Omdurman, west of the capital, Khartoum, "exceeded all imaginations."

"The security forces prevented ambulances from crossing to transport the injured and wounded participating in the demonstrations," the ministry added in a statement.

And it called on "all doctors and health cadres to go to the Al-Arbaeen Hospital in Omdurman, because the available medical staff was unable to provide service to all the injured, because the scale of repression and injuries exceeded all imaginations." The ministry did not mention the number and nature of injuries.

On Thursday, demonstrations called by the "Professionals Gathering" and the "resistance committees" began to denounce the political agreement signed between the President of the Sovereignty Council, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, and Prime Minister Abdullah Hamdok, and to demand the return of democratic civilian rule.

Since last October 25, Sudan has witnessed protests against the measures taken by Al-Burhan, including declaring a state of emergency, dissolving the Sovereignty and Transitional Ministers Councils, dismissing Hamdok, and arresting party leaders and officials.

Political and civil forces considered these measures a "military coup", in exchange for a denial by the army, which described them as "corrective".

On Wednesday and Thursday, the security authorities closed some bridges and streets in central Khartoum, with containers, barbed wire, and concrete barriers to prevent the arrival of demonstrators rejecting "military rule" to the vicinity of the presidential palace.

On November 21, Al-Burhan and Hamdok signed a political agreement that included the latter's return to his position, the formation of a government of competencies, the release of political prisoners, and the two parties' pledge to work together to complete the democratic path.

However, Sudanese political and civil forces consider the agreement an "attempt to legitimize the coup", and pledge to continue protests until full civilian rule is achieved during the transitional period.

Since August 21, 2019, the country has been in a transitional period that ends with elections in July 2023, during which power is shared by the army, civilian forces and armed movements that signed an agreement with the government to bring peace in 2020.

Tunisian opposition calls for a day of anger against the coup and parties condemn the finance decree


The "Citizens Against the Coup" initiative called for participation in a day of outrage against the coup, on the anniversary of the revolution, while opposition parties condemned the 2022 Finance Decree and considered it an "imminent danger."

The "Citizens Against the Coup" initiative called on Thursday in Tunisia to participate in a "day of outrage against the coup", on the anniversary of the upcoming January 14 revolution.

During a press conference in Tunis, a member of the initiative's executive body, Jawhar Ben Mubarak, urged the Tunisian people to "prepare for the upcoming January 14th, to be a day of true celebration of the revolution, and a day of outrage against the coup."

“Ibn Mubarak” means by the coup exceptional measures initiated by President Qais Saeed on July 25, including: freezing the powers of Parliament, holding early elections on December 17, 2022, abolishing the constitutionality monitoring body, issuing legislation by presidential decrees, and dismissing a president the government.

He warned "international financial institutions against engaging with the coup authority, dealing with them, and financing the state budget for the year 2022."

And he considered that the budget "included unfair and illegitimate financial measures whose meaning is to further impoverish the poor and burden the people."

He continued: "The Finance Law, which was established by the government of (Najla) Boden, is an embezzlement of public money and taxpayers' money. We reject all international and internal financial commitments made by the coup government."

Ayyad Al-Loumi, a member of the initiative, said: "We will present a case for those responsible for this budget, i.e. the head of state, the prime minister and the minister of finance," considering that "the current finance law will lead the country to bankruptcy and will deepen the economic crisis further."

Yousry Al-Dali, a member of the initiative, said that "the law is illegal, because, contrary to what the constitution stipulates, it was mentioned in a presidential decree and exceeded the legal deadlines."

As for the Afaq Tounes party, it described the law as "the greatest imminent danger" to the country.

The party (two deputies out of 217 in Parliament whose jurisdiction has been suspended) added in a statement that "this law is based on absorbing the efforts of Tunisians and incapacitating them by raising (increase) payments (taxes) on individuals and institutions."

It is also based on “protecting and encouraging the parallel economy, without announcing any real measures to restore the engines of the national economy represented in state development projects and internal and external investment to work,” according to the party.

The constitution stipulates that “the draft finance law shall be submitted to Parliament no later than 15 October, and it shall be ratified no later than 10 December of each year.”

On Tuesday, the government announced its budget for 2022, with an expected primary deficit of three billion dollars, equivalent to 6.7 percent of the country's gross domestic product.

The severity of economic and financial pressures on Tunisia has escalated as part of the repercussions of a severe political crisis that the country has been experiencing, since the start of Said's exceptional measures.

The majority of political forces in Tunisia reject these measures, and consider them a "coup against the constitution", while other forces support them and see them as a "correction of the course of the 2011 revolution", which on January 14 of that year overthrew the regime of then-President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.

Defending these measures, Saeed, who began a five-year presidential term in 2019, said that they are "measures within the framework of the constitution to protect the state from an imminent danger," according to his assessment.

5 Comments

  1. The violent repression of protests in Sudan, resulting in deaths and injuries, is deeply concerning. Preventing ambulances from reaching the wounded exacerbates this humanitarian crisis. Urgent action is needed to address this tragedy.

    ReplyDelete
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