Can a person get corona and influenza at the same time?

Can a person get corona and influenza at the same time?  Can a person get COVID-19 and the flu at the same time? What are the similarities and differences between the Covid-19 virus and the influenza virus? What is the relationship between corona infection and male fertility? The answers and more are in this report.  Yes, one can have both diseases at the same time. And the most effective way to prevent hospitalization and exposure to severe infection with COVID-19 and influenza is vaccination with vaccines against them, according to the World Health Organization, according to what it said in a detailed publication on COVID-19 and influenza.  Is it possible for a person to catch #Covid_19 and #flu at the same time?  🤔, Corona covid, source WHO, covid-19 influenza  What are the similarities between the Covid-19 virus and the influenza virus? First: COVID-19 and influenza are two diseases that both affect the respiratory system Both viruses share some symptoms, including cough, runny nose, sore throat, fever, headache, and fatigue. Individuals may have varying levels of illness with COVID-19 and influenza. Those infected may not have any symptoms, they may have mild symptoms, or they may develop severe illness. Influenza and COVID-19 can lead to death, according to the World Health Organization.  Second, COVID-19 and influenza spread in similar ways The World Health Organization says that COVID-19 and influenza are spread by droplets and droplets that an infected person spreads when coughing, sneezing, talking, singing or breathing. The droplets and spray can land on the eyes, noses or mouths of nearby people, usually within 1 meter of the infected person, and sometimes even further. People can get COVID-19 or the flu when they touch contaminated surfaces and then touch their eyes, nose or mouth without washing their hands.  Third: Some individuals from the same groups are more susceptible to severe illness due to COVID-19 and influenza. Although all age groups can be infected with COVID-19 and the influenza virus, the following people are at higher risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19 and influenza:  The elderly -People of all ages with chronic medical conditions (such as chronic heart, lung, kidney, metabolic, neurological, liver, or blood conditions) People with immunosuppressive conditions (such as HIV/AIDS, patients receiving chemotherapy or steroids, or those with malignant tumors) and health care workers are at high risk of developing COVID-19 and influenza. -Pregnant women and those who have recently given birth are at high risk of severe influenza and severe COVID-19.  Fourth: The same preventive measures are effective against COVID-19 and influenza To protect against COVID-19 and influenza, follow the following public health and social measures:  -Avoid crowded and poorly ventilated places. -Open windows or doors to keep rooms well ventilated. -Cover your mouth and nose with the bend of the elbow or a tissue when coughing or sneezing, and throw the tissue into a closed trash. -Wash your hands often. -Avoid touching the eyes, nose and mouth. -Stay home if you feel unwell.  Fifth: There are safe and effective vaccines to prevent COVID-19 and influenza COVID-19 vaccines have been shown to protect against severe illness and death from COVID-19 disease. Millions of people around the world have safely received COVID-19 vaccines, and the vaccines have met strict standards for safety, efficacy and quality. Also, getting vaccinated may protect the people around you. And if you are protected from contracting COVID-19, you reduce your chances of infecting others. And COVID-19 vaccines do not protect against influenza, according to the WHO.  WHO recommends getting vaccinated every year to prevent severe influenza in high-risk groups: pregnant women, people with underlying health conditions, the elderly, health workers and young children.  What are the differences between the COVID-19 virus and the influenza virus?  First: Covid-19 treatments differ from influenza treatments Options currently used in medical facilities to treat COVID-19 include oxygen, corticosteroids, and IL6 receptor blockers for severely ill patients. Treatment for people with severe respiratory illness includes advanced respiratory support such as the use of ventilators. There are many other treatment options for COVID-19 that are currently undergoing clinical trials.  Antiviral drugs for influenza can reduce severe complications and the risk of death, and are especially important for the most vulnerable groups. It is important to remember that antibiotics are not effective against the influenza virus or the COVID-19 virus.  Usually, people with both diseases can get treatment safely at home.  Second, COVID-19 vaccines differ from influenza vaccines. Vaccines developed for COVID-19 do not protect against influenza, and similarly, the influenza vaccine does not protect against COVID-19. Follow local authorities' advice about getting the flu and COVID-19 vaccines.  “Omicron” a rapid spread and symptoms similar to “Delta” and influenza Influenza influenza Delta Omicron Corona symptoms  If I get the flu, do I also need the COVID-19 vaccine? Yes. You need both vaccinations.  How can I protect myself from COVID-19 and influenza?  The most effective way to protect yourself from flu and severe COVID-19 infection is to get vaccinated with flu and COVID-19 vaccines, according to the WHO.  The most effective way to prevent infection with the virus that causes COVID-19 is to get vaccinated and follow the prevention measures: keep at least one meter away from others, and if you can't, wear an appropriate mask, avoid crowded and poorly ventilated places, and open windows and doors to keep yourself safe. Keep the rooms well ventilated, and wash your hands frequently.  Follow local authorities' advice about getting the flu and COVID-19 vaccines.  Infection of men with corona may lead to a decrease in fertility levels A new study said that vaccination against Covid-19 disease does not reduce the chances of successfully conceiving for couples trying to have children, according to data studied by researchers at Boston University and reported by Deutsche Welle . However, it appears that the men in the study who tested positive for the virus had some form of "short-term decline in fertility".  The results of the study were published this week in the American Journal of Epidemiology. The researchers relied on data from people enrolled online in a Boston University pregnancy rate study.  The study adds more information to a growing body of evidence that supports the use of vaccines to protect pregnant women and reduce risks to their babies, while the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as groups of medical professionals, are urging all couples trying to get pregnant to get vaccinated against the disease.  Dr. Diana Bianchi, chair of the National Institutes of Health, which funded the study, said: "The results are reassuring that vaccination against COVID-19 for couples seeking pregnancy does not appear to impair fertility for women."  A statistical analysis of data collected from participants found "no meaningful association" between couples who reported having received COVID-19 vaccines and their likelihood of childbearing, compared to unvaccinated participants.  "Transient" decrease in fertility in men However, male couples who reported having contracted COVID-19 appeared to have some degree of a "transient decrease" in the likelihood of pregnancy within 60 days. The researchers said, "These findings suggest that coronavirus infection may be associated with a short-term decrease in male fertility."  Some studies found a temporary decrease in the production of sperm in some men after infection with the Corona virus, which causes Covid-19 disease, and scientists attributed the matter to the fact that this may be the result of a fever that lasted for days due to the disease.  "We know that COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective," said Dr. Miani Dillman, a vaccine consultant with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "If you are pregnant, postpartum, breastfeeding, trying to become pregnant now, or may become pregnant in the future, please receive the vaccination." ".

Can a person get corona and influenza at the same time?


Can a person get COVID-19 and the flu at the same time? What are the similarities and differences between the Covid-19 virus and the influenza virus? What is the relationship between corona infection and male fertility? The answers and more are in this report.

Yes, one can have both diseases at the same time. And the most effective way to prevent hospitalization and exposure to severe infection with COVID-19 and influenza is vaccination with vaccines against them, according to the World Health Organization, according to what it said in a detailed publication on COVID-19 and influenza.

Is it possible for a person to catch #Covid_19 and #flu at the same time?  🤔, Corona covid, source WHO, covid-19 influenza

What are the similarities between the Covid-19 virus and the influenza virus?
First: COVID-19 and influenza are two diseases that both affect the respiratory system
Both viruses share some symptoms, including cough, runny nose, sore throat, fever, headache, and fatigue. Individuals may have varying levels of illness with COVID-19 and influenza. Those infected may not have any symptoms, they may have mild symptoms, or they may develop severe illness. Influenza and COVID-19 can lead to death, according to the World Health Organization.

Second, COVID-19 and influenza spread in similar ways
The World Health Organization says that COVID-19 and influenza are spread by droplets and droplets that an infected person spreads when coughing, sneezing, talking, singing or breathing. The droplets and spray can land on the eyes, noses or mouths of nearby people, usually within 1 meter of the infected person, and sometimes even further. People can get COVID-19 or the flu when they touch contaminated surfaces and then touch their eyes, nose or mouth without washing their hands.

Third: Some individuals from the same groups are more susceptible to severe illness due to COVID-19 and influenza.
Although all age groups can be infected with COVID-19 and the influenza virus, the following people are at higher risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19 and influenza:

The elderly
-People of all ages with chronic medical conditions (such as chronic heart, lung, kidney, metabolic, neurological, liver, or blood conditions)
People with immunosuppressive conditions (such as HIV/AIDS, patients receiving chemotherapy or steroids, or those with malignant tumors) and health care workers are at high risk of developing COVID-19 and influenza.
-Pregnant women and those who have recently given birth are at high risk of severe influenza and severe COVID-19.

Fourth: The same preventive measures are effective against COVID-19 and influenza
To protect against COVID-19 and influenza, follow the following public health and social measures:

-Avoid crowded and poorly ventilated places.
-Open windows or doors to keep rooms well ventilated.
-Cover your mouth and nose with the bend of the elbow or a tissue when coughing or sneezing, and throw the tissue into a closed trash.
-Wash your hands often.
-Avoid touching the eyes, nose and mouth.
-Stay home if you feel unwell.

Fifth: There are safe and effective vaccines to prevent COVID-19 and influenza
COVID-19 vaccines have been shown to protect against severe illness and death from COVID-19 disease. Millions of people around the world have safely received COVID-19 vaccines, and the vaccines have met strict standards for safety, efficacy and quality. Also, getting vaccinated may protect the people around you. And if you are protected from contracting COVID-19, you reduce your chances of infecting others. And COVID-19 vaccines do not protect against influenza, according to the WHO.

WHO recommends getting vaccinated every year to prevent severe influenza in high-risk groups: pregnant women, people with underlying health conditions, the elderly, health workers and young children.

What are the differences between the COVID-19 virus and the influenza virus?

First: Covid-19 treatments differ from influenza treatments
Options currently used in medical facilities to treat COVID-19 include oxygen, corticosteroids, and IL6 receptor blockers for severely ill patients. Treatment for people with severe respiratory illness includes advanced respiratory support such as the use of ventilators. There are many other treatment options for COVID-19 that are currently undergoing clinical trials.

Antiviral drugs for influenza can reduce severe complications and the risk of death, and are especially important for the most vulnerable groups. It is important to remember that antibiotics are not effective against the influenza virus or the COVID-19 virus.

Usually, people with both diseases can get treatment safely at home.

Second, COVID-19 vaccines differ from influenza vaccines.
Vaccines developed for COVID-19 do not protect against influenza, and similarly, the influenza vaccine does not protect against COVID-19. Follow local authorities' advice about getting the flu and COVID-19 vaccines.

“Omicron” a rapid spread and symptoms similar to “Delta” and influenza Influenza influenza Delta Omicron Corona symptoms

If I get the flu, do I also need the COVID-19 vaccine?
Yes. You need both vaccinations.

How can I protect myself from COVID-19 and influenza?

The most effective way to protect yourself from flu and severe COVID-19 infection is to get vaccinated with flu and COVID-19 vaccines, according to the WHO.

The most effective way to prevent infection with the virus that causes COVID-19 is to get vaccinated and follow the prevention measures: keep at least one meter away from others, and if you can't, wear an appropriate mask, avoid crowded and poorly ventilated places, and open windows and doors to keep yourself safe. Keep the rooms well ventilated, and wash your hands frequently.

Follow local authorities' advice about getting the flu and COVID-19 vaccines.

Infection of men with corona may lead to a decrease in fertility levels
A new study said that vaccination against Covid-19 disease does not reduce the chances of successfully conceiving for couples trying to have children, according to data studied by researchers at Boston University and reported by Deutsche Welle . However, it appears that the men in the study who tested positive for the virus had some form of "short-term decline in fertility".

The results of the study were published this week in the American Journal of Epidemiology. The researchers relied on data from people enrolled online in a Boston University pregnancy rate study.

The study adds more information to a growing body of evidence that supports the use of vaccines to protect pregnant women and reduce risks to their babies, while the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as groups of medical professionals, are urging all couples trying to get pregnant to get vaccinated against the disease.

Dr. Diana Bianchi, chair of the National Institutes of Health, which funded the study, said: "The results are reassuring that vaccination against COVID-19 for couples seeking pregnancy does not appear to impair fertility for women."

A statistical analysis of data collected from participants found "no meaningful association" between couples who reported having received COVID-19 vaccines and their likelihood of childbearing, compared to unvaccinated participants.

"Transient" decrease in fertility in men
However, male couples who reported having contracted COVID-19 appeared to have some degree of a "transient decrease" in the likelihood of pregnancy within 60 days. The researchers said, "These findings suggest that coronavirus infection may be associated with a short-term decrease in male fertility."

Some studies found a temporary decrease in the production of sperm in some men after infection with the Corona virus, which causes Covid-19 disease, and scientists attributed the matter to the fact that this may be the result of a fever that lasted for days due to the disease.

"We know that COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective," said Dr. Miani Dillman, a vaccine consultant with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "If you are pregnant, postpartum, breastfeeding, trying to become pregnant now, or may become pregnant in the future, please receive the vaccination." ".
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