The jumper is the best robot at jumping from any machine or living being

In a research paper published in the journal Nature, researchers presented the "Jumper" robot, a robot that jumps to high altitudes, exceeding all standards for those included in the jumpers, a category that includes organisms and machines.

"Following these ideas, we have created a robot that can jump to a height of more than 30 metres, which according to our knowledge is much higher than the previously designed jumps, and by size it is higher than the best jumpers," says the robot.

The jumping robot, which is less than 30 centimeters high and weighs more than 1 ounce (30 g), can launch itself 108 feet (33 meters) into the air, with a take-off speed of 92 feet (28 meters) per second.

New model for jumping
Humans have always been fascinated with jumping, Aristotle discussed using weights to jump higher, and for more than half a century engineers have looked to the biological world for inspiration in designing jumping machines.

Engineers face some fundamental power generation constraints for jumping operations. “Muscles and actuators cannot generate the high power outputs needed to drive jumpers on their own,” Sarah Bergpreiter, a mechanical engineer at Carnegie Mellon University wrote in an article published alongside the Nature paper.

She added that living systems and even robotic devices could not go far by using their "muscles and motors to store energy in spring-like structures" before releasing the energy once in a method called spring actuation.
The jumper is the best robot at jumping from any machine or living being  In a research paper published in the journal Nature, researchers presented the "Jumper" robot, a robot that jumps to high altitudes, exceeding all standards for those included in the jumpers, a category that includes organisms and machines.  "Following these ideas, we have created a robot that can jump to a height of more than 30 metres, which according to our knowledge is much higher than the previously designed jumps, and by size it is higher than the best jumpers," says the robot.  The jumping robot, which is less than 30 centimeters high and weighs more than 1 ounce (30 g), can launch itself 108 feet (33 meters) into the air, with a take-off speed of 92 feet (28 meters) per second.  New model for jumping Humans have always been fascinated with jumping, Aristotle discussed using weights to jump higher, and for more than half a century engineers have looked to the biological world for inspiration in designing jumping machines.  Engineers face some fundamental power generation constraints for jumping operations. “Muscles and actuators cannot generate the high power outputs needed to drive jumpers on their own,” Sarah Bergpreiter, a mechanical engineer at Carnegie Mellon University wrote in an article published alongside the Nature paper.  She added that living systems and even robotic devices could not go far by using their "muscles and motors to store energy in spring-like structures" before releasing the energy once in a method called spring actuation.  revolutionary designs Previous researchers have investigated how some organisms are able to propel themselves high into the air, such as the tiny froghopper, an insect that can jump 115 times its body length, but these studies were limited. For example, there are some significant differences between the actuators in living organisms (such as muscles) and the actuators available to engineers.  “Rotary motors commonly found in robots can overcome [these limitations] by acting as a lever to provide a force over a much larger displacement without the need for a larger motor, thus increasing labor intensity,” the paper says.  Expected uses Scientists hope the jumper can be used to reach hard-to-reach places quickly and without cost or risk.  Among the expected uses of the jumper is to work as an exploration robot for volcanic craters or peaks that have not been trampled by human feet, whether as a center for broadcasting information for explorers, or as a rescue and supply robot for medical and rescue teams.  In terms of military uses, it can be used as a carrier and launcher for warheads or explosives, or even as a weapon by itself to strike specific targets at different altitudes.


Revolutionary designs
Previous researchers have investigated how some organisms are able to propel themselves high into the air, such as the tiny froghopper, an insect that can jump 115 times its body length, but these studies were limited. For example, there are some significant differences between the actuators in living organisms (such as muscles) and the actuators available to engineers.

“Rotary motors commonly found in robots can overcome [these limitations] by acting as a lever to provide a force over a much larger displacement without the need for a larger motor, thus increasing labor intensity,” the paper says.

Expected uses
Scientists hope the jumper can be used to reach hard-to-reach places quickly and without cost or risk.

Among the expected uses of the jumper is to work as an exploration robot for volcanic craters or peaks that have not been trampled by human feet, whether as a center for broadcasting information for explorers, or as a rescue and supply robot for medical and rescue teams.

In terms of military uses, it can be used as a carrier and launcher for warheads or explosives, or even as a weapon by itself to strike specific targets at different altitudes.
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