China The detection of a new virus of animal origin that infected 35 people

China The detection of a new virus of animal origin that infected 35 people Thirty-five people in Shandong Province and East China's Hainan Province have been confirmed to have been infected with the new Lanjia virus (Lai Vi), which belongs to the Hennepa virus family.  Scientists are tracking the impact of a new zoonotic virus in eastern China, where dozens of people have been infected.  And 35 people in Shandong Province and East China's Hainan Province were confirmed to have been infected with the new Lanjia virus (Lai Vi), which belongs to the Hennepa virus family.  Fever, fatigue and cough are symptoms of Langea virus infection.  It is believed that the Langia virus that infected these people was transmitted to them from animals, and there is no evidence so far that this virus can be transmitted from human to human.  Researchers are tracking the virus, which primarily infects shrew mice.  The New England Journal of Medicine published a report highlighting this discovery, and it was prepared by researchers from China, Singapore and Australia.  One of these researchers, Linfa Wang, was quoted by the Chinese state-owned Global Times newspaper as saying that the Lai virus infections detected so far are neither fatal nor very dangerous, and therefore there is "no need to panic."  But there is a need for caution; Especially since many viruses that were transmitted from animals to humans caused unexpected results, added Wang, who works as a professor of emerging infectious diseases in Singapore.  The researchers said that the virus (LyV) was found in 27 percent of the shrew mice examined, which suggests that this mouse-like mammal may represent a "natural reservoir" of this virus.  Among the dogs and goats that were examined, the researchers found "LyV" virus at 5% and 2%, respectively.  On Sunday, the Taiwan Center for Disease Control said it was paying "close attention" to the evolution of the Lai Viroid virus, which belongs to the family of zoonotic Hennepa viruses that can pass from animal to human.  Zoonotic viruses are very common, but they have been getting a lot of attention since the outbreak of the Corona virus.  According to the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention, scientists estimate that three out of every four new infectious diseases that affect humans are transmitted to them from animals.  The United Nations had warned earlier that the world may witness more of these infectious diseases, especially in light of the increasing human exploitation of wildlife, as well as the effects of climate change.  Some zoonotic viruses have the ability to kill humans, including the Nipah virus, which spreads in intermittent cycles between animals and humans in Asia, as well as the Hendra virus, which was first discovered in horses in Australia.  The researchers found other viruses belonging to the Hennepa family, other than "Ly V", in shrew mice, as well as in bats and rodents.

Thirty-five people in Shandong Province and East China's Hainan Province have been confirmed to have been infected with the new Lanjia virus (Lai Vi), which belongs to the Hennepa virus family.

Scientists are tracking the impact of a new zoonotic virus in eastern China, where dozens of people have been infected.

And 35 people in Shandong Province and East China's Hainan Province were confirmed to have been infected with the new Lanjia virus (Lai Vi), which belongs to the Hennepa virus family.

Fever, fatigue and cough are symptoms of Langea virus infection.

It is believed that the Langia virus that infected these people was transmitted to them from animals, and there is no evidence so far that this virus can be transmitted from human to human.

Researchers are tracking the virus, which primarily infects shrew mice.

The New England Journal of Medicine published a report highlighting this discovery, and it was prepared by researchers from China, Singapore and Australia.

One of these researchers, Linfa Wang, was quoted by the Chinese state-owned Global Times newspaper as saying that the Lai virus infections detected so far are neither fatal nor very dangerous, and therefore there is "no need to panic."

But there is a need for caution; Especially since many viruses that were transmitted from animals to humans caused unexpected results, added Wang, who works as a professor of emerging infectious diseases in Singapore.

The researchers said that the virus (LyV) was found in 27 percent of the shrew mice examined, which suggests that this mouse-like mammal may represent a "natural reservoir" of this virus.

Among the dogs and goats that were examined, the researchers found "LyV" virus at 5% and 2%, respectively.

On Sunday, the Taiwan Center for Disease Control said it was paying "close attention" to the evolution of the Lai Viroid virus, which belongs to the family of zoonotic Hennepa viruses that can pass from animal to human.

Zoonotic viruses are very common, but they have been getting a lot of attention since the outbreak of the Corona virus.

According to the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention, scientists estimate that three out of every four new infectious diseases that affect humans are transmitted to them from animals.

The United Nations had warned earlier that the world may witness more of these infectious diseases, especially in light of the increasing human exploitation of wildlife, as well as the effects of climate change.

Some zoonotic viruses have the ability to kill humans, including the Nipah virus, which spreads in intermittent cycles between animals and humans in Asia, as well as the Hendra virus, which was first discovered in horses in Australia.

The researchers found other viruses belonging to the Hennepa family, other than "Ly V", in shrew mice, as well as in bats and rodents.
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