The second in a week a Lebanese gunman stormed a bank and retrieved its deposit before surrendering

The second in a week a Lebanese gunman stormed a bank and retrieved its deposit before surrendering The official Lebanese news agency announced that a Lebanese gunman stormed a bank in the Ghazieh region in the south of the country, demanding the return of his deposit. He later surrendered to the security teams that surrounded the place.  On Friday, an armed Lebanese man stormed a bank in the Ghazieh region in the south of the country, demanding the return of his deposit.  And the official Lebanese news agency reported, "Citizen M.Q., accompanied by another person, entered a bank branch in Ghazieh, Sidon District (south), demanding the return of his deposit."  She added, "The citizen deliberately threatened the employees with a military weapon and threatened to burn the branch if his deposit was not given."  She explained that later, "the gunman surrendered himself to the security forces who came to the scene."  For its part, the Lebanese "Al-Jadeed" channel reported that the citizen was able to obtain the amount of 19,200 dollars from his deposit and hand it over to one of the people who was waiting for him outside.  In a similar incident, the Lebanese woman, Sally Hafez, stormed the Bank of Lebanon and the Diaspora on Wednesday and forced the branch at gunpoint to hand her $20,000 from her deposit to treat her sick sister.   On August 11, a Lebanese gunman stormed a bank on Hamra Street in the capital, and took hostages there. The operation ended after an agreement was reached with him to hand over part of his deposited funds.  Last January, another Lebanese man recovered $50,000 from his deposit after he stormed a bank in the Bekaa Governorate (east), took a number of hostages and threatened to burn the place.  During the past period, such incidents have been repeated in Lebanese banks, following their refusal to give depositors their money in dollars.  For more than two and a half years, Lebanon's banks have imposed restrictions on depositors' money in foreign currency, especially the dollar, and placed severe ceilings on withdrawing money in Lebanese pounds.  Since 2019, the Lebanese have been suffering from an unprecedented severe economic crisis that has led to a record collapse in the value of the local currency against the dollar, as well as a shortage of fuel and medicine, and the collapse of their purchasing power.

The official Lebanese news agency announced that a Lebanese gunman stormed a bank in the Ghazieh region in the south of the country, demanding the return of his deposit. He later surrendered to the security teams that surrounded the place.

On Friday, an armed Lebanese man stormed a bank in the Ghazieh region in the south of the country, demanding the return of his deposit.

And the official Lebanese news agency reported, "Citizen M.Q., accompanied by another person, entered a bank branch in Ghazieh, Sidon District (south), demanding the return of his deposit."

She added, "The citizen deliberately threatened the employees with a military weapon and threatened to burn the branch if his deposit was not given."

She explained that later, "the gunman surrendered himself to the security forces who came to the scene."

For its part, the Lebanese "Al-Jadeed" channel reported that the citizen was able to obtain the amount of 19,200 dollars from his deposit and hand it over to one of the people who was waiting for him outside.

In a similar incident, the Lebanese woman, Sally Hafez, stormed the Bank of Lebanon and the Diaspora on Wednesday and forced the branch at gunpoint to hand her $20,000 from her deposit to treat her sick sister.

On August 11, a Lebanese gunman stormed a bank on Hamra Street in the capital, and took hostages there. The operation ended after an agreement was reached with him to hand over part of his deposited funds.

Last January, another Lebanese man recovered $50,000 from his deposit after he stormed a bank in the Bekaa Governorate (east), took a number of hostages and threatened to burn the place.

During the past period, such incidents have been repeated in Lebanese banks, following their refusal to give depositors their money in dollars.

For more than two and a half years, Lebanon's banks have imposed restrictions on depositors' money in foreign currency, especially the dollar, and placed severe ceilings on withdrawing money in Lebanese pounds.

Since 2019, the Lebanese have been suffering from an unprecedented severe economic crisis that has led to a record collapse in the value of the local currency against the dollar, as well as a shortage of fuel and medicine, and the collapse of their purchasing power.
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