Germany Tens of thousands protest to demand lower inflation and support for energy prices

Meloni is sworn in and becomes Italy's first female prime minister Georgia Meloni was sworn in on Saturday, becoming Italy's first female prime minister, starting the term of Italy's most right-wing government since World War Two.  Giorgia Meloni was sworn in as Italy's prime minister, becoming the first far-right government to head the country's government since the end of World War II.  Meloni, 45, was sworn in before Italian President Sergio Mattarella in the presidential palace building, becoming the first woman to hold this position in the country.  Meloni pledged to be loyal to the Italian Republic and to work "exclusively in the interests of the nation".  Meloni signed the pledge and so did President Mattarella, who, as head of state, acts as guarantor of the constitution drafted in the years immediately following the end of the war, which saw the demise of fascist dictator Benito Mussolini.  Also, 24 ministers in Meloni's government were sworn in, 5 of whom are technocrats, who do not represent any party.  Her "Brothers of Italy" party, which she co-founded in 2021, will lead the government in coalition with the right-wing League led by Matteo Salvini and former Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi's Forza Italia, whose parties have lost popularity among voters in recent years.  Notable allies of Meloni include former Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi and right-wing League leader Maito Salvini, who are known for their admiration for Russian President Vladimir Putin.  Meloni made no public comments in her first hours in office. She is expected to set her priorities when she mobilizes support in parliament ahead of a confidence vote, which new governments usually take, next week.  The results of the vote, according to political analysts, may indicate cracks within the three-party coalition, if none of Berlusconi's deputies or Salvini, disgruntled because they did not get the ministries they wanted for their parties, would rally behind it. Germany Tens of thousands protest to demand lower inflation and support for energy prices Tens of thousands of protesters in six German cities have marched, calling for the government to lower inflation and increase energy subsidies. According to the Greenpeace organization involved in organizing the protests, the number of demonstrators reached about 24,000.  Tens of thousands of protesters have gathered in six German cities to demand more justice in the distribution of government funds to deal with rising energy prices and the cost of living and a rapid shift towards stopping dependence on the use of fossil fuels.  Protesters marched in Berlin, Dusseldorf, Hanover, Stuttgart, Dresden and Frankfurt, carrying banners bearing broad demands that include lowering inflation, stopping nuclear power plants and increasing energy subsidies for the poor.  The Greenpeace organization, involved in organizing the protests, stated that the number of demonstrators reached about 24,000, but the police said that about 1,800 protesters had gathered in Berlin.  On Friday, the German parliament approved the government's 200 billion-euro ($195 billion) rescue package, which aims to protect businesses and households from the impact of high energy prices.  The package includes a one-time payment to cover a monthly gas bill for households and small and medium-sized businesses and a mechanism to limit prices from March.  German inflation hit its highest level in more than a quarter of a century at 10.9% in September, driven by rising energy costs.

Tens of thousands of protesters in six German cities have marched, calling for the government to lower inflation and increase energy subsidies. According to the Greenpeace organization involved in organizing the protests, the number of demonstrators reached about 24,000.

Tens of thousands of protesters have gathered in six German cities to demand more justice in the distribution of government funds to deal with rising energy prices and the cost of living and a rapid shift towards stopping dependence on the use of fossil fuels.

Protesters marched in Berlin, Dusseldorf, Hanover, Stuttgart, Dresden and Frankfurt, carrying banners bearing broad demands that include lowering inflation, stopping nuclear power plants and increasing energy subsidies for the poor.

The Greenpeace organization, involved in organizing the protests, stated that the number of demonstrators reached about 24,000, but the police said that about 1,800 protesters had gathered in Berlin.

On Friday, the German parliament approved the government's 200 billion-euro ($195 billion) rescue package, which aims to protect businesses and households from the impact of high energy prices.

The package includes a one-time payment to cover a monthly gas bill for households and small and medium-sized businesses and a mechanism to limit prices from March.

German inflation hit its highest level in more than a quarter of a century at 10.9% in September, driven by rising energy costs.

Meloni is sworn in and becomes Italy's first female prime minister

Georgia Meloni was sworn in on Saturday, becoming Italy's first female prime minister, starting the term of Italy's most right-wing government since World War Two.

Giorgia Meloni was sworn in as Italy's prime minister, becoming the first far-right government to head the country's government since the end of World War II.

Meloni, 45, was sworn in before Italian President Sergio Mattarella in the presidential palace building, becoming the first woman to hold this position in the country.

Meloni pledged to be loyal to the Italian Republic and to work "exclusively in the interests of the nation".

Meloni signed the pledge and so did President Mattarella, who, as head of state, acts as guarantor of the constitution drafted in the years immediately following the end of the war, which saw the demise of fascist dictator Benito Mussolini.

Also, 24 ministers in Meloni's government were sworn in, 5 of whom are technocrats, who do not represent any party.

Her "Brothers of Italy" party, which she co-founded in 2021, will lead the government in coalition with the right-wing League led by Matteo Salvini and former Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi's Forza Italia, whose parties have lost popularity among voters in recent years.

Notable allies of Meloni include former Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi and right-wing League leader Maito Salvini, who are known for their admiration for Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Meloni made no public comments in her first hours in office. She is expected to set her priorities when she mobilizes support in parliament ahead of a confidence vote, which new governments usually take, next week.

The results of the vote, according to political analysts, may indicate cracks within the three-party coalition, if none of Berlusconi's deputies or Salvini, disgruntled because they did not get the ministries they wanted for their parties, would rally behind it.
Previous Post Next Post

Translate / Choose Your Language

Answer / Free classified ads / Any information me ⤵️