Study: Exposure to an imperceptible gas increases the risk of stroke Study: Exposure to an imperceptible gas increases the risk of stroke

Study: Exposure to an imperceptible gas increases the risk of stroke

Study: Exposure to an imperceptible gas increases the risk of stroke

A new study finds that exposure to imperceptible, odorless radon gas is associated with an increased risk of stroke.
The study, which examined exposure to the gas in 158,910 female participants with an average age of 63 years, found an increased risk of stroke among women who were exposed to high and even moderate concentrations of the gas, compared to those exposed to the lowest concentrations.

The study, published in the online issue of the Journal of Neuroscience, does not prove that exposure to radon gas causes stroke, but only shows the link between them.

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that occurs when minerals such as uranium or radium decay in rocks and soil. The gas can make its way into homes through cracks in basement walls and floors, masonry joints and gaps around pipes.

Study author Eric A. said: "Radon is an indoor air pollutant that can only be detected by tests that measure concentrations of the gas in homes. Our research found an increased risk of stroke among participants who were exposed to radon at high levels," said Wetzel, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

To determine radon exposure, researchers linked participants' home addresses to radon concentration data from the US Geological Survey and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

The EPA recommends that average indoor radon concentrations should not exceed four picocuries per liter (pCi/L).

After adjusting for factors such as smoking, diabetes, and high blood pressure, the researchers found that participants in the group with higher gas levels had a 14 percent increased risk of stroke.

"Further studies are needed to confirm our findings. Confirmation would provide an opportunity to improve public health by addressing the emerging risk factor for stroke," Wetzel said.

Limitations of the study included that it only included female participants who were middle-aged or older, so the results may not be the same for other demographic groups.



The benefits of regular sexual intercourse for women's health


Scientists at the University of Texas at Austin have discovered the benefits of regular sexual intercourse for women's health.


The Journal of the American Medical Association indicates that, according to the results of the study, having sex once a week greatly affects the physical and mental condition of women. Because during intercourse, hormones are secreted, such as serotonin, dopamine, and estrogen, whose effect on the body is similar to the effect of good sleep, physical activity, and proper nutrition.

According to researchers, it is best to have an intimate relationship with a steady partner. Because practicing it with others increases the risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases.

It should be noted that sexologist Tracy Cox previously explained that engaging in intimate relations can pose a health risk, including contributing to the development of cancer. According to her, infections transmitted during sexual intercourse include herpes, chlamydia, and human papillomavirus.
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