Scientists discover evidence of the formation of primordial black holes in the early universe Scientists discover evidence of the formation of primordial black holes in the early universe

Scientists discover evidence of the formation of primordial black holes in the early universe

Scientists discover evidence of the formation of primordial black holes in the early universe
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Japanese scientists have discovered evidence that the early universe contained very few primordial black holes, miniature counterparts of the black holes that exist today.

Otherwise, traces of their existence would be preserved in the cosmic microwave background radiation, as the microwave "echo" of the Big Bang. This was reported on Wednesday, May 29 by the University of Tokyo Press Service.

"Many colleagues believe that primordial black holes are candidates for playing the role of a form of dark matter," said Jason Christiano, a researcher at the University of Tokyo. "Our calculations showed that such processes could have led to the formation of a much smaller number of such objects than is required for dark matter."

Scientists reached this conclusion while studying how the process of formation of primordial black holes in the first moments of the existence of the universe affected the structure and properties of the cosmic microwave background radiation, which is the microwave background glow of the universe, which arose during the process of its ultra-rapid expansion and cooling of its primary matter.

Japanese astrophysicists tried to reproduce the already studied features in the structure of the cosmic microwave background radiation using several popular cosmological theories describing the process of the formation of the universe and the appearance of primordial black holes in it. In these calculations, scientists took into account how the process of its formation affected not only large fluctuations in the structure of the cosmic microwave background radiation, but also less obvious fluctuations.

Professor Yokoyama explained: “We found that small fluctuations that were present during the ultrafast expansion of the universe, which are thought to be linked to the formation of primordial black holes, should have had an unusually strong effect on the longer wavelengths we see in the modern cosmic background radiation. We We hypothesize that this unusually strong shortwave effect can be explained using existing quantum field theory. 

For this reason, cosmologists believe that the number of primordial black holes would have been very small if they were assumed to have formed at the beginning of the universe, otherwise traces of their existence would have been preserved in the cosmic microwave background radiation. This explains their apparent absence from the modern universe, and also casts doubt on the ideas that primordial black holes are responsible for a large portion of dark matter, in addition to some recorded explosions of gravitational waves, according to scientists.

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