Africa Cup of Nations dead and injured in a stampede in front of a stadium in Cameroon

Africa Cup of Nations dead and injured in a stampede in front of a stadium in Cameroon  At least eight people were killed and 50 injured in a stampede on Monday outside a football stadium in Cameroon, which is hosting the Africa Cup of Nations. For its part, the African Union, which organizes the continental competition, announced that it is "investigating the situation and trying to obtain more details."  At least eight people were killed and 50 injured in a stampede Monday outside a football stadium in Cameroon, which is hosting the African Nations Cup, according to official media.  A crowd of fans tried to enter an Olympic stadium in the capital, Yaounde, through a southern gate, to watch the match between Cameroon and Comoros.  Although the capacity of the stadium, which can accommodate sixty thousand spectators, has been reduced due to Corona’s measures, the capacity is being raised from sixty to 80% when the Cameroon Lions play on their land.  A report issued by the Cameroonian Ministry of Health said: "Eight deaths have been recorded of two women and four men, all in their thirties, in addition to a child and a dead body taken by family members."  The ministry added that the wounded were taken "immediately by ambulances to hospitals, but the traffic jam slowed down the transportation process."  The ministry indicated that about 50 people were injured in the stampede, including two people with multiple injuries, and two others with serious head injuries.  Earlier, a spokesman for the Organizing Committee of the African Nations Cup, Abel Mebenge, told AFP: "There was a stampede, as it can happen when there is crowding. We are waiting for reliable information about the number of victims in this tragic accident."  The African Union, which organizes the continental competition, announced in a statement that it was "investigating the situation and trying to obtain more details about what happened."  In a statement posted on the Internet, the federation added that it had sent its general secretary to the "fan clinic in the hospital in Yaounde", noting that it was "in constant contact with the Cameroonian government and the local organizing committee."  Cameroonian Health Minister Manauda Malachi posted pictures of him on Twitter visiting a hospital treating the injured in the accident.  "Everything is being done to provide them with free medical care and the best support," he wrote.  On the field, before the news of the stampede spread, Cameroon secured their place in the Cup quarter-finals, and are scheduled to face Gambia in Douala.

Africa Cup of Nations dead and injured in a stampede in front of a stadium in Cameroon


At least eight people were killed and 50 injured in a stampede on Monday outside a football stadium in Cameroon, which is hosting the Africa Cup of Nations. For its part, the African Union, which organizes the continental competition, announced that it is "investigating the situation and trying to obtain more details."

At least eight people were killed and 50 injured in a stampede Monday outside a football stadium in Cameroon, which is hosting the African Nations Cup, according to official media.

A crowd of fans tried to enter an Olympic stadium in the capital, Yaounde, through a southern gate, to watch the match between Cameroon and Comoros.

Although the capacity of the stadium, which can accommodate sixty thousand spectators, has been reduced due to Corona’s measures, the capacity is being raised from sixty to 80% when the Cameroon Lions play on their land.

A report issued by the Cameroonian Ministry of Health said: "Eight deaths have been recorded of two women and four men, all in their thirties, in addition to a child and a dead body taken by family members."

The ministry added that the wounded were taken "immediately by ambulances to hospitals, but the traffic jam slowed down the transportation process."

The ministry indicated that about 50 people were injured in the stampede, including two people with multiple injuries, and two others with serious head injuries.

Earlier, a spokesman for the Organizing Committee of the African Nations Cup, Abel Mebenge, told AFP: "There was a stampede, as it can happen when there is crowding. We are waiting for reliable information about the number of victims in this tragic accident."

The African Union, which organizes the continental competition, announced in a statement that it was "investigating the situation and trying to obtain more details about what happened."

In a statement posted on the Internet, the federation added that it had sent its general secretary to the "fan clinic in the hospital in Yaounde", noting that it was "in constant contact with the Cameroonian government and the local organizing committee."

Cameroonian Health Minister Manauda Malachi posted pictures of him on Twitter visiting a hospital treating the injured in the accident.

"Everything is being done to provide them with free medical care and the best support," he wrote.

On the field, before the news of the stampede spread, Cameroon secured their place in the Cup quarter-finals, and are scheduled to face Gambia in Douala.


Because of "fundamental differences", the director of the presidential office in Tunisia resigns  Nadia Okasha, director of the Tunisian presidential office and closest advisor to President Kais Saied, announced her resignation from her position due to fundamental differences in views regarding the country's interest.  Nadia Okasha, director of the Tunisian presidential office and closest advisor to President Kais Saied, announced her resignation from her position due to fundamental differences in views regarding the country's interest.  Okasha was Said's closest aide since he came to power in a landslide victory in 2019, and during his moves last July, which included suspending parliament and assuming executive power in what his opponents describe as a coup.  Okasha wrote on her Facebook page: "Without going into details, I decided today to submit my resignation to the President of the Republic from the position of Director of the Presidential Office after two years of work, in the presence of fundamental differences in viewpoints related to (Tunisia)'s best interest. I consider it my duty to withdraw."  No official statement or confirmation of her resignation has yet been issued. A political source said: "The dispute is caused by the president's support for his interior minister's decision to refer six major security leaders, including a former head of the intelligence service, to mandatory retirement," according to his statement to Reuters.  Tunisian government officials, foreign diplomats, and former presidential staff describe Oukacha as Saied's closest and most trusted advisor, and that almost all dealings with him are conducted through her.  Several senior advisors have also resigned from Saeed since his election without replacing any of them. Said's seizure of sweeping powers and his announced plans to rewrite the constitution have cast doubt on Tunisia's decade-old democratic system and impeded the country's quest for an international bailout of its public finances.  The president launched an online public consultation before drafting a new constitution that he says will be put to a referendum, but he has not brought key players from politicians or civil society into the process.  Although his actions initially appeared to have broad support among Tunisians weary of economic stagnation and political paralysis, political leaders have expressed growing opposition.  Saeed has promised to preserve the rights and freedoms gained in the 2011 uprising that brought democracy to the country and sparked the Arab Spring, but critics accuse security forces of using more aggressive tactics against opponents.  Without a more comprehensive policy approach or broad agreement on economic reforms, major Western donors say privately that Saeed is unlikely to get the international help needed to finance budget and debt payments.

Because of "fundamental differences", the director of the presidential office in Tunisia resigns


Nadia Okasha, director of the Tunisian presidential office and closest advisor to President Kais Saied, announced her resignation from her position due to fundamental differences in views regarding the country's interest.

Nadia Okasha, director of the Tunisian presidential office and closest advisor to President Kais Saied, announced her resignation from her position due to fundamental differences in views regarding the country's interest.

Okasha was Said's closest aide since he came to power in a landslide victory in 2019, and during his moves last July, which included suspending parliament and assuming executive power in what his opponents describe as a coup.

Okasha wrote on her Facebook page: "Without going into details, I decided today to submit my resignation to the President of the Republic from the position of Director of the Presidential Office after two years of work, in the presence of fundamental differences in viewpoints related to (Tunisia)'s best interest. I consider it my duty to withdraw."

No official statement or confirmation of her resignation has yet been issued.
A political source said: "The dispute is caused by the president's support for his interior minister's decision to refer six major security leaders, including a former head of the intelligence service, to mandatory retirement," according to his statement to Reuters.

Tunisian government officials, foreign diplomats, and former presidential staff describe Oukacha as Saied's closest and most trusted advisor, and that almost all dealings with him are conducted through her.

Several senior advisors have also resigned from Saeed since his election without replacing any of them.
Said's seizure of sweeping powers and his announced plans to rewrite the constitution have cast doubt on Tunisia's decade-old democratic system and impeded the country's quest for an international bailout of its public finances.

The president launched an online public consultation before drafting a new constitution that he says will be put to a referendum, but he has not brought key players from politicians or civil society into the process.

Although his actions initially appeared to have broad support among Tunisians weary of economic stagnation and political paralysis, political leaders have expressed growing opposition.

Saeed has promised to preserve the rights and freedoms gained in the 2011 uprising that brought democracy to the country and sparked the Arab Spring, but critics accuse security forces of using more aggressive tactics against opponents.

Without a more comprehensive policy approach or broad agreement on economic reforms, major Western donors say privately that Saeed is unlikely to get the international help needed to finance budget and debt payments.



Burkina Faso's army seizes power in the country and suspends the constitution  Burkina Faso's army ousted President Roc Kabore, suspended the constitution, dissolved the government and parliament, and closed the borders.  Burkina Faso's army said on Monday it had ousted President Roque Kabore, suspended the constitution, dissolved the government and parliament and closed the border.  The declaration, signed by Lieutenant-Colonel Paul Henry Sandaugo Damiba and read by another officer on state television, stated that the takeover had taken place without violence and that those arrested were in a safe place.  Western media reported on Monday that Burkina Faso President Roch Christian Kabore was being held by a group of soldiers, in addition to a number of masked soldiers stationed in front of the official television headquarters in the capital, Ouagadougou.  According to the Associated Press, it was not clear yet whether these masked soldiers came to control the headquarters of Burkina Faso Radio and Television, or whether they were soldiers loyal to the government deployed to guard it.  Earlier in the day, two security sources told the media that "President Kabore, the Speakers of Parliament and the ministers are effectively in the hands of the soldiers, at the Sangoulé Lamizana barracks in Ouagadougou."  Reports indicated that Kabori's detention took place on Sunday. Soldiers mutinied in a number of military barracks across the country, demanding the dismissal of senior army officials and the allocation of additional resources to confront terrorist groups.  Shooting was heard late Sunday near the home of President Roch Mark Kabore in the capital, while eyewitnesses reported seeing a helicopter hovering over the place.  Yesterday, the government of Burkina Faso admitted that there had been shootings inside several barracks in the country, denying the army's seizure of power.  The government, through its spokesman, Al-Kasum Maiga, called on the citizens to remain calm after military sources announced that shooting was heard in several barracks, including two in the capital.  "The information circulating on social media leads people to believe that the army has seized power," Maiga said in a statement.  "The government, while acknowledging the authenticity of the shooting in certain barracks, denies this information (about the army's seizure of power) and calls on the residents to remain calm," he added.  The shooting came a day after new demonstrations protesting the authorities' inability to deal with the attacks of armed groups that have swept Burkina Faso since 2015.  And security sources announced the killing of two soldiers in the north during the protests, which were banned by the authorities earlier in the week.  And last week, the Burkina Faso authorities arrested several soldiers on charges of attempting a coup in the country.

Burkina Faso's army seizes power in the country and suspends the constitution


Burkina Faso's army ousted President Roc Kabore, suspended the constitution, dissolved the government and parliament, and closed the borders.

Burkina Faso's army said on Monday it had ousted President Roque Kabore, suspended the constitution, dissolved the government and parliament and closed the border.

The declaration, signed by Lieutenant-Colonel Paul Henry Sandaugo Damiba and read by another officer on state television, stated that the takeover had taken place without violence and that those arrested were in a safe place.

Western media reported on Monday that Burkina Faso President Roch Christian Kabore was being held by a group of soldiers, in addition to a number of masked soldiers stationed in front of the official television headquarters in the capital, Ouagadougou.

According to the Associated Press, it was not clear yet whether these masked soldiers came to control the headquarters of Burkina Faso Radio and Television, or whether they were soldiers loyal to the government deployed to guard it.

Earlier in the day, two security sources told the media that "President Kabore, the Speakers of Parliament and the ministers are effectively in the hands of the soldiers, at the Sangoulé Lamizana barracks in Ouagadougou."

Reports indicated that Kabori's detention took place on Sunday.
Soldiers mutinied in a number of military barracks across the country, demanding the dismissal of senior army officials and the allocation of additional resources to confront terrorist groups.

Shooting was heard late Sunday near the home of President Roch Mark Kabore in the capital, while eyewitnesses reported seeing a helicopter hovering over the place.

Yesterday, the government of Burkina Faso admitted that there had been shootings inside several barracks in the country, denying the army's seizure of power.

The government, through its spokesman, Al-Kasum Maiga, called on the citizens to remain calm after military sources announced that shooting was heard in several barracks, including two in the capital.

"The information circulating on social media leads people to believe that the army has seized power," Maiga said in a statement.

"The government, while acknowledging the authenticity of the shooting in certain barracks, denies this information (about the army's seizure of power) and calls on the residents to remain calm," he added.

The shooting came a day after new demonstrations protesting the authorities' inability to deal with the attacks of armed groups that have swept Burkina Faso since 2015.

And security sources announced the killing of two soldiers in the north during the protests, which were banned by the authorities earlier in the week.

And last week, the Burkina Faso authorities arrested several soldiers on charges of attempting a coup in the country.


Sudan the death toll from the protests has risen to three, and the security forces violently suppress the demonstrations  Three protesters were shot dead by security forces during Monday's demonstrations in the capital, Khartoum. Thousands of Sudanese continued to demand democratic civilian rule and denounce the killing of demonstrators, while the police fired tear gas.  The Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors announced that three protesters were killed by security forces' bullets during Monday's demonstrations in the capital, Khartoum, according to the committee's statement.  And earlier on Monday, the committee said in a second statement: "The Khartoum demonstrations heading to the presidential palace and the Omdurman demonstrations (west of the capital) are facing excessive violence, as the coup forces use live bullets and tear gas extensively in addition to sound bombs."  The statement added: "There are a number of injuries from gunfire and tear gas canisters, including critical cases, which we are working on counting."  According to the statement, the medical committee called on human rights organizations to monitor this repressive behavior, which should not be used to confront peaceful demonstrations.  And on Monday, thousands of Sudanese went out in the capital and its neighborhoods to demonstrate again against the military coup, which was carried out by the Sudanese army chief, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, three months ago, according to the French press agency.  Thousands of demonstrators gathered in a march heading to the presidential palace in central Khartoum. Protesters also took to the streets of Omdurman to demand civilian rule and accountability for the deaths of protesters who have fallen since the protests against the coup began, and their number reached at least 73 people.  Sudanese police fired tear gas to disperse the protesters heading to the presidential palace, according to Anadolu Agency. For his part, Imad Mohamed, an eyewitness, said: "About three thousand people gathered in the city center carrying Sudanese flags and pictures of those killed during the protests."  He added, "The demonstrators chanted No to military rule, civil is the people's decision," according to his statement to Agence France-Presse.  In the cities of Gedaref, Kassala, Port Sudan and El Obeid, hundreds demonstrated, chanting slogans demanding civilian rule.  On Sunday, the Sudanese authorities announced their intention to secure Monday's demonstrations, as well as the sovereign and strategic sites in central Khartoum, open Nile bridges, and continue Internet services.  This is the first time that the authorities have announced the continuation of internet services and the non-closure of bridges, before any demonstrations, especially the ongoing Monday, which the Sudanese Professionals Association called for.  And on Sunday, the resistance committees announced a week of escalation, including demonstrations and the closure of the streets of Khartoum, to demand civilian rule.  Since last October 25, Sudan has witnessed protests in response to exceptional measures taken by the army chief, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, most notably the imposition of a state of emergency and the dissolution of the Sovereignty Councils and the transitional ministers, what political forces consider a "military coup", in exchange for the army's denial.  And 76 people have been killed in the demonstrations since they began on October 25, according to the Sudan Doctors Committee.

Sudan the death toll from the protests has risen to three, and the security forces violently suppress the demonstrations


Three protesters were shot dead by security forces during Monday's demonstrations in the capital, Khartoum. Thousands of Sudanese continued to demand democratic civilian rule and denounce the killing of demonstrators, while the police fired tear gas.

The Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors announced that three protesters were killed by security forces' bullets during Monday's demonstrations in the capital, Khartoum, according to the committee's statement.

And earlier on Monday, the committee said in a second statement: "The Khartoum demonstrations heading to the presidential palace and the Omdurman demonstrations (west of the capital) are facing excessive violence, as the coup forces use live bullets and tear gas extensively in addition to sound bombs."

The statement added: "There are a number of injuries from gunfire and tear gas canisters, including critical cases, which we are working on counting."

According to the statement, the medical committee called on human rights organizations to monitor this repressive behavior, which should not be used to confront peaceful demonstrations.

And on Monday, thousands of Sudanese went out in the capital and its neighborhoods to demonstrate again against the military coup, which was carried out by the Sudanese army chief, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, three months ago, according to the French press agency.

Thousands of demonstrators gathered in a march heading to the presidential palace in central Khartoum. Protesters also took to the streets of Omdurman to demand civilian rule and accountability for the deaths of protesters who have fallen since the protests against the coup began, and their number reached at least 73 people.

Sudanese police fired tear gas to disperse the protesters heading to the presidential palace, according to Anadolu Agency.
For his part, Imad Mohamed, an eyewitness, said: "About three thousand people gathered in the city center carrying Sudanese flags and pictures of those killed during the protests."

He added, "The demonstrators chanted No to military rule, civil is the people's decision," according to his statement to Agence France-Presse.

In the cities of Gedaref, Kassala, Port Sudan and El Obeid, hundreds demonstrated, chanting slogans demanding civilian rule.

On Sunday, the Sudanese authorities announced their intention to secure Monday's demonstrations, as well as the sovereign and strategic sites in central Khartoum, open Nile bridges, and continue Internet services.

This is the first time that the authorities have announced the continuation of internet services and the non-closure of bridges, before any demonstrations, especially the ongoing Monday, which the Sudanese Professionals Association called for.

And on Sunday, the resistance committees announced a week of escalation, including demonstrations and the closure of the streets of Khartoum, to demand civilian rule.

Since last October 25, Sudan has witnessed protests in response to exceptional measures taken by the army chief, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, most notably the imposition of a state of emergency and the dissolution of the Sovereignty Councils and the transitional ministers, what political forces consider a "military coup", in exchange for the army's denial.

And 76 people have been killed in the demonstrations since they began on October 25, according to the Sudan Doctors Committee.
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