Borrell warns Russia of the consequences of Ukraine's "provocation"

Borrell warns Russia of the consequences of Ukraine's "provocation"  European Union Foreign and Security Affairs Commissioner Josep Borrell warned in a letter to Moscow ahead of a meeting with Ukrainian officials on Wednesday that "any provocation or aggression" against Ukraine would have serious consequences.  "The EU is Ukraine's closest partner and we fully support Ukraine's territorial integrity and sovereignty," the EU's top diplomat said in an interview with the Polish News Agency published on Tuesday.  During his visit, Borrell will meet with Ukrainian officials, including Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba, in Kiev and eastern Ukraine.  Borrell's efforts come as part of an international campaign to calm the simmering crisis on the Ukrainian border.  For weeks, the West has been concerned about reports that Russia has amassed tens of thousands of troops not far from Ukraine, raising fears of a Russian invasion.  Moscow rejects this accusation and in turn accuses Ukraine of moving more soldiers to the eastern regions controlled by pro-Russian separatists.  These developments evoke the events of 2014, when Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea and began its continued support for separatists in eastern Ukraine.  It is scheduled to hold talks between the United States and Russia in Geneva next Monday. Russia and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) plan to hold separate talks two days later, on January 12.

Borrell warns Russia of the consequences of Ukraine's "provocation"

European Union Foreign and Security Affairs Commissioner Josep Borrell warned in a letter to Moscow ahead of a meeting with Ukrainian officials on Wednesday that "any provocation or aggression" against Ukraine would have serious consequences.

"The EU is Ukraine's closest partner and we fully support Ukraine's territorial integrity and sovereignty," the EU's top diplomat said in an interview with the Polish News Agency published on Tuesday.

During his visit, Borrell will meet with Ukrainian officials, including Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba, in Kiev and eastern Ukraine.

Borrell's efforts come as part of an international campaign to calm the simmering crisis on the Ukrainian border.

For weeks, the West has been concerned about reports that Russia has amassed tens of thousands of troops not far from Ukraine, raising fears of a Russian invasion.

Moscow rejects this accusation and in turn accuses Ukraine of moving more soldiers to the eastern regions controlled by pro-Russian separatists.

These developments evoke the events of 2014, when Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimea and began its continued support for separatists in eastern Ukraine.

It is scheduled to hold talks between the United States and Russia in Geneva next Monday. Russia and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) plan to hold separate talks two days later, on January 12.

France announces the exit of 300 foreign mercenaries from Haftar's control areas in Libya  A spokeswoman for the French Foreign Ministry announced on Tuesday that 300 foreign mercenaries had left eastern Libya, and did not specify the time when the mercenaries left or the country to which they belong, while diplomats said that the mercenaries who left were from Chad.  The French Foreign Ministry said Tuesday that 300 foreign mercenaries have left eastern Libya, hailing the start of a phased withdrawal of thousands of foreign troops who fought on both sides of the conflict in the strife-torn country.  The move, which was initially announced by eastern Libyan forces and militias led by putschist Khalifa Haftar in November, aims to support a UN-backed agreement between the two sides in the conflict through the formation of a joint military commission.  "This first withdrawal, which is a first positive sign, occurred after the November 12 conference," said Anne-Claire Legendre, a spokeswoman for the French Foreign Ministry, referring to the Paris conference, which was aimed at breaking the deadlock in Libya.  "This must now be followed by the complete withdrawal of mercenaries, foreign fighters and foreign forces as soon as possible," she added.  It did not specify the time the mercenaries left, nor the country to which they belong. Diplomats said the mercenaries who left were from Chad.  The withdrawal comes after the chaos tampered with efforts by Libya's leadership to hold elections in late December, when the country's electoral commission said the vote could not be held, citing what it called shortcomings in the electoral law and judicial appeals process.  The ceasefire agreement reached in 2020 in Geneva called for all foreign forces and mercenaries to leave by January 2021, and the same call was repeated at the Paris conference.  Mercenaries from the Russian Wagner Group are deployed alongside the militias led by Haftar in the east, which Moscow supported in the war on the side of the UAE and Egypt. Turkey supports the Tripoli government under the security agreement that links them.  United Nations experts say that the two sides of the conflict in Libya have deployed mercenaries on a large scale, including from Chad, Sudan and Syria.


France announces the exit of 300 foreign mercenaries from Haftar's control areas in Libya

A spokeswoman for the French Foreign Ministry announced on Tuesday that 300 foreign mercenaries had left eastern Libya, and did not specify the time when the mercenaries left or the country to which they belong, while diplomats said that the mercenaries who left were from Chad.

The French Foreign Ministry said Tuesday that 300 foreign mercenaries have left eastern Libya, hailing the start of a phased withdrawal of thousands of foreign troops who fought on both sides of the conflict in the strife-torn country.

The move, which was initially announced by eastern Libyan forces and militias led by putschist Khalifa Haftar in November, aims to support a UN-backed agreement between the two sides in the conflict through the formation of a joint military commission.

"This first withdrawal, which is a first positive sign, occurred after the November 12 conference," said Anne-Claire Legendre, a spokeswoman for the French Foreign Ministry, referring to the Paris conference, which was aimed at breaking the deadlock in Libya.

"This must now be followed by the complete withdrawal of mercenaries, foreign fighters and foreign forces as soon as possible," she added.

It did not specify the time the mercenaries left, nor the country to which they belong. Diplomats said the mercenaries who left were from Chad.

The withdrawal comes after the chaos tampered with efforts by Libya's leadership to hold elections in late December, when the country's electoral commission said the vote could not be held, citing what it called shortcomings in the electoral law and judicial appeals process.

The ceasefire agreement reached in 2020 in Geneva called for all foreign forces and mercenaries to leave by January 2021, and the same call was repeated at the Paris conference.

Mercenaries from the Russian Wagner Group are deployed alongside the militias led by Haftar in the east, which Moscow supported in the war on the side of the UAE and Egypt. Turkey supports the Tripoli government under the security agreement that links them.

United Nations experts say that the two sides of the conflict in Libya have deployed mercenaries on a large scale, including from Chad, Sudan and Syria.


18 deputies in Germany and two ministers in the Netherlands Active political participation of the Turks of Europe  After decades of political marginalization, I have left Europe in recent years to participate efficiently and effectively within European community organizations and political parties, and thus their representation in European parliaments and governments has increased significantly.  According to the latest data released by the German government last year, about 2.8 million immigrants of Turkish origin, who were born in Turkey or whose parents were born in Turkey, live in Germany. It is estimated that approximately 1.2 million of these were eligible to participate in the last elections, which took place in September 2021.  Although the migration of Turkish workers to Germany began with the Employment of Migrant Workers Agreement concluded in 1961, and thus the presence of the Turks on German soil has passed for more than 60 years, the Turks have obtained their right to political representation in Germany and the rest of the European Union countries since Eighties only.  In recent years, the number of politicians of Turkish origin has increased actively, whether in European parliaments or governments, and at least 5 politicians of Turkish origin have taken up their positions in the European Parliament, which will certainly reflect on European-Turkish relations, and improve the living conditions of Turks within the countries of the Union. European.  The origin of the story In the years following their arrival in Germany and the rest of the European Union, Turks began to engage in political activities as members of trade unions, and remained out of politics until the 1980s.  In the 1980s, although the idea of ​​immigrants actively participating in Germany's political and social life was not discussed, the number of Turks who wanted a say in the politics of the country in which they lived has been increasing since then.  Sevim Celebi, who came to Berlin as a 20-year-old worker and was a member of the Alternative List for Democracy and Environmental Protection, succeeded in entering the Berlin State Assembly in 1987, becoming Germany's first Turkish representative.  Throughout the subsequent decades, the Turks continued to have political representation in Germany, the Netherlands and the rest of the European Union until they obtained their first ministerial representation within the German government in 2010, when the conservative Christian Democratic Union appointed a politician of Turkish origins, Aygul Ozkan, in the Ministry of Social Affairs in Lower Saxony. About a year later, Belkai Une of the Social Democratic Party was also appointed to the Ministry of Integration in Baden-Württemberg.  18 deputies in the German parliament Although the number of politicians of Turkish origin in Germany has not yet reached the desired level, it has started to increase in recent years. In the last elections that took place last September, and for the first time in German history, the German Federal Parliament included 83 deputies of foreign origin, including 18 deputies of Turkish origin out of more than 100 people who stood in these elections.  Thus, politicians of Turkish origin recorded a greater presence in the current parliament, compared to the presence of 14 deputies in the previous parliament, according to German television, "Deutsche Welle."  The representatives of Turkish origin are divided into several parties, including 9 from the Social Democratic Party (the New Chancellor's Party), 5 from the Green Party, 3 from the Left Party, and a deputy from the Christian Democratic Union.  Among the most prominent of these representatives is Aydan Oz Oguz, who became the first female parliamentarian of Turkish origin to be chosen as a deputy speaker of parliament in Germany, after winning 544 votes out of 727 during the voting session that took place to choose the parliament speaker and deputies. It is noteworthy that Oz Oguz was born in the German city of Hamburg in 1967, and entered parliament on behalf of the Social Democratic Party, following the parliamentary elections of 2009. In 2011 Oz Oguz became the deputy head of the party, and she also became Minister of State for Migration and Integration Affairs, thus becoming the first person from Turkish origin holds this position.  Some German media reports that Cem Ozdemir, deputy head of the Green Party, is a candidate to take over the Ministry of Agriculture in the government of the new German Chancellor of the Social Democratic Party Olaf Schulz.  Two ministers in the Dutch government Two female deputies of Turkish origin will fill two seats in the new Dutch four-party coalition government, after the country's political parties reached an agreement led by Prime Minister Mark Rutte, after 271 days without a government in the country.  For her part, Dilan Yesilguz, a 44-year-old Ankara-born politician from the right-wing People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD), who has been a member of Parliament since the 2017 general election, will serve as Minister of Justice and Security in the new government. . It is reported that Yesilgoz was previously Minister of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy.  Junay Oslo, 49, from a Turkish family with roots in the central Anatolian city of Afyonkarahisar, will be appointed as Minister of State for Information and Culture in the new government.

18 deputies in Germany and two ministers in the Netherlands Active political participation of the Turks of Europe

After decades of political marginalization, I have left Europe in recent years to participate efficiently and effectively within European community organizations and political parties, and thus their representation in European parliaments and governments has increased significantly.

According to the latest data released by the German government last year, about 2.8 million immigrants of Turkish origin, who were born in Turkey or whose parents were born in Turkey, live in Germany. It is estimated that approximately 1.2 million of these were eligible to participate in the last elections, which took place in September 2021.

Although the migration of Turkish workers to Germany began with the Employment of Migrant Workers Agreement concluded in 1961, and thus the presence of the Turks on German soil has passed for more than 60 years, the Turks have obtained their right to political representation in Germany and the rest of the European Union countries since Eighties only.

In recent years, the number of politicians of Turkish origin has increased actively, whether in European parliaments or governments, and at least 5 politicians of Turkish origin have taken up their positions in the European Parliament, which will certainly reflect on European-Turkish relations, and improve the living conditions of Turks within the countries of the Union. European.

The origin of the story

In the years following their arrival in Germany and the rest of the European Union, Turks began to engage in political activities as members of trade unions, and remained out of politics until the 1980s.

In the 1980s, although the idea of ​​immigrants actively participating in Germany's political and social life was not discussed, the number of Turks who wanted a say in the politics of the country in which they lived has been increasing since then.

Sevim Celebi, who came to Berlin as a 20-year-old worker and was a member of the Alternative List for Democracy and Environmental Protection, succeeded in entering the Berlin State Assembly in 1987, becoming Germany's first Turkish representative.

Throughout the subsequent decades, the Turks continued to have political representation in Germany, the Netherlands and the rest of the European Union until they obtained their first ministerial representation within the German government in 2010, when the conservative Christian Democratic Union appointed a politician of Turkish origins, Aygul Ozkan, in the Ministry of Social Affairs in Lower Saxony. About a year later, Belkai Une of the Social Democratic Party was also appointed to the Ministry of Integration in Baden-Württemberg.

18 deputies in the German parliament

Although the number of politicians of Turkish origin in Germany has not yet reached the desired level, it has started to increase in recent years. In the last elections that took place last September, and for the first time in German history, the German Federal Parliament included 83 deputies of foreign origin, including 18 deputies of Turkish origin out of more than 100 people who stood in these elections.

Thus, politicians of Turkish origin recorded a greater presence in the current parliament, compared to the presence of 14 deputies in the previous parliament, according to German television, "Deutsche Welle."

The representatives of Turkish origin are divided into several parties, including 9 from the Social Democratic Party (the New Chancellor's Party), 5 from the Green Party, 3 from the Left Party, and a deputy from the Christian Democratic Union.

Among the most prominent of these representatives is Aydan Oz Oguz, who became the first female parliamentarian of Turkish origin to be chosen as a deputy speaker of parliament in Germany, after winning 544 votes out of 727 during the voting session that took place to choose the parliament speaker and deputies. It is noteworthy that Oz Oguz was born in the German city of Hamburg in 1967, and entered parliament on behalf of the Social Democratic Party, following the parliamentary elections of 2009. In 2011 Oz Oguz became the deputy head of the party, and she also became Minister of State for Migration and Integration Affairs, thus becoming the first person from Turkish origin holds this position.

Some German media reports that Cem Ozdemir, deputy head of the Green Party, is a candidate to take over the Ministry of Agriculture in the government of the new German Chancellor of the Social Democratic Party Olaf Schulz.

Two ministers in the Dutch government

Two female deputies of Turkish origin will fill two seats in the new Dutch four-party coalition government, after the country's political parties reached an agreement led by Prime Minister Mark Rutte, after 271 days without a government in the country.

For her part, Dilan Yesilguz, a 44-year-old Ankara-born politician from the right-wing People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD), who has been a member of Parliament since the 2017 general election, will serve as Minister of Justice and Security in the new government. . It is reported that Yesilgoz was previously Minister of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy.

Junay Oslo, 49, from a Turkish family with roots in the central Anatolian city of Afyonkarahisar, will be appointed as Minister of State for Information and Culture in the new government.

Previous Post Next Post