Former US President Jimmy Carter: Even established democracies can fall into the hands of tyrants and tyrants

Former US President Jimmy Carter: Even established democracies can fall into the hands of tyrants and tyrants  In an article for the New York Times , the 39th US President Jimmy Carter expressed his fear for his country's democracy, warning that even established democracies can fall into the hands of dictators and military tyrants, and therefore cannot be allowed to happen in the United States.  He referred to the storming of the Capitol on January 6, 2021 by violent mobs led by what he called unscrupulous politicians, and how this attempt almost succeeded in preventing the democratic transfer of power.  And one year after that event, Carter added, the promoters of the election theft lie have taken over one political party and cast doubt on our electoral systems, noting that those forces exercise power and influence through persistent misinformation and continue to turn Americans against each other.  Carter pointed to the Survey Center on American Life report that 35% of Americans - nearly 100 million adults across the political spectrum - agree that "the traditional American way of life is disappearing so quickly that we may have to use force to save it."  The Washington Post recently reported that nearly 40% of Republicans believe violent action against the government is sometimes justified.  Carter added that politicians in his state of Georgia and in other states have exploited the mistrust they have created to enact laws that enable partisan legislatures to interfere in electoral processes, and seek to win by any means, as many Americans are persuaded to think and act similarly, which threatens to collapse the foundations on which the security of country and its democracy.  Carter now fears that what America has struggled so hard to achieve globally, the right to free and fair elections unhindered by authoritarian politicians who only seek to develop their power, is dangerously fragile at home. He believes that in order for American democracy to continue, we must ask our leaders and candidates to uphold the ideals of freedom and adhere to high standards of behavior, through the following steps:  What America has striven to achieve globally, the right to free and fair elections unhindered by authoritarian politicians who only seek to develop their power, is dangerously fragile at home.  First, while citizens can differ on policies, people of all political spectrum must agree on basic constitutional principles and standards of fairness and respect for the rule of law, that citizens be able to participate easily in transparent and secure electoral processes, and that claims of electoral wrongdoing should be brought in good faith to adjudicate in which the courts, with all participants agreeing to accept the results, and that the electoral process be conducted peacefully and free from intimidation and violence.  Second, press for reforms that guarantee security and access to elections and ensure public confidence in the accuracy of results, because false allegations of illegal voting and multiple pointless checks detract from democratic ideals.  Third, the polarization that reshapes identity around politics must be resisted, and we must focus on some basic facts: We are all human, we are all Americans, and we have common hopes for the prosperity of our communities and our country. We must find ways to re-engage across division, respectfully and constructively, through civic dialogues with family, friends, and co-workers, and collectively standing up to the dividing forces.  Fourth: Violence has no place in our politics, and we must act urgently to pass or strengthen laws to reverse the trends of character assassination, intimidation, and the presence of armed militias. We must protect election officials from what threatens their safety. Law enforcement should have the authority to address these issues and engage in a national effort to come to terms with the past and the present.  Finally, the spread of misinformation, especially on social media, must be addressed. And the need to reform these platforms and get used to searching for accurate information. US companies and religious communities should encourage respect for democratic standards, participation in elections, and efforts to counter disinformation.  "Our great nation is now teetering on the brink of a widening abyss," Carter concluded. "Without immediate action, we are in real danger of civil strife and the loss of our precious democracy. Americans must set aside differences and work together before it is too late."

Former US President Jimmy Carter: Even established democracies can fall into the hands of tyrants and tyrants

In an article for the New York Times , the 39th US President Jimmy Carter expressed his fear for his country's democracy, warning that even established democracies can fall into the hands of dictators and military tyrants, and therefore cannot be allowed to happen in the United States.

He referred to the storming of the Capitol on January 6, 2021 by violent mobs led by what he called unscrupulous politicians, and how this attempt almost succeeded in preventing the democratic transfer of power.

And one year after that event, Carter added, the promoters of the election theft lie have taken over one political party and cast doubt on our electoral systems, noting that those forces exercise power and influence through persistent misinformation and continue to turn Americans against each other.

Carter pointed to the Survey Center on American Life report that 35% of Americans - nearly 100 million adults across the political spectrum - agree that "the traditional American way of life is disappearing so quickly that we may have to use force to save it."

The Washington Post recently reported that nearly 40% of Republicans believe violent action against the government is sometimes justified.

Carter added that politicians in his state of Georgia and in other states have exploited the mistrust they have created to enact laws that enable partisan legislatures to interfere in electoral processes, and seek to win by any means, as many Americans are persuaded to think and act similarly, which threatens to collapse the foundations on which the security of country and its democracy.

Carter now fears that what America has struggled so hard to achieve globally, the right to free and fair elections unhindered by authoritarian politicians who only seek to develop their power, is dangerously fragile at home. He believes that in order for American democracy to continue, we must ask our leaders and candidates to uphold the ideals of freedom and adhere to high standards of behavior, through the following steps:

What America has striven to achieve globally, the right to free and fair elections unhindered by authoritarian politicians who only seek to develop their power, is dangerously fragile at home.

First, while citizens can differ on policies, people of all political spectrum must agree on basic constitutional principles and standards of fairness and respect for the rule of law, that citizens be able to participate easily in transparent and secure electoral processes, and that claims of electoral wrongdoing should be brought in good faith to adjudicate in which the courts, with all participants agreeing to accept the results, and that the electoral process be conducted peacefully and free from intimidation and violence.

Second, press for reforms that guarantee security and access to elections and ensure public confidence in the accuracy of results, because false allegations of illegal voting and multiple pointless checks detract from democratic ideals.

Third, the polarization that reshapes identity around politics must be resisted, and we must focus on some basic facts: We are all human, we are all Americans, and we have common hopes for the prosperity of our communities and our country. We must find ways to re-engage across division, respectfully and constructively, through civic dialogues with family, friends, and co-workers, and collectively standing up to the dividing forces.

Fourth: Violence has no place in our politics, and we must act urgently to pass or strengthen laws to reverse the trends of character assassination, intimidation, and the presence of armed militias. We must protect election officials from what threatens their safety. Law enforcement should have the authority to address these issues and engage in a national effort to come to terms with the past and the present.

Finally, the spread of misinformation, especially on social media, must be addressed. And the need to reform these platforms and get used to searching for accurate information. US companies and religious communities should encourage respect for democratic standards, participation in elections, and efforts to counter disinformation.

"Our great nation is now teetering on the brink of a widening abyss," Carter concluded. "Without immediate action, we are in real danger of civil strife and the loss of our precious democracy. Americans must set aside differences and work together before it is too late."

America is the first country to recognize its independence. Why is Kazakhstan a dilemma for Washington?  30 years ago, the United States was the first country to recognize the independence of Kazakhstan after the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991. Since independence, Kazakhstan has pursued a multi-oriented foreign policy and seeks to achieve balance in its relations with major powers, especially as it shares long borders with Russia from the north and China to the east .  However, many experts consider Kazakhstan to be one of the countries in the orbit of Russian influence, and this has complicated US-Kazakh relations, especially in recent years.  Washington and Moscow and the demonstrations With the outbreak of violence and mass demonstrations protesting the increase in liquefied natural gas prices in many Kazakh cities, some Russian newspapers linked these protests to a role played by foreign hands, in reference to the United States.  American experts believe that Moscow does not want the regime in Kazakhstan to make concessions to the opposition and the demonstrators, at a time when Russian newspapers indicated that what is happening in Kazakhstan is a "dirty trick targeting Moscow" ahead of important talks days later on the Ukraine crisis between Washington, NATO and Russia.  That prompted White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki to say, "There are some crazy Russian claims about the United States being behind this, so let me just take this opportunity to show that it's completely bogus, and obviously part of the Russian disinformation book that we've seen over the course of the year. past years".  On the other hand, a statement issued by the State Department indicated that the US government is closely following the developments in the situation in Kazakhstan.  The statement condemned the acts of violence and destruction of property, and called on the authorities and demonstrators to exercise restraint, and to respect and defend constitutional institutions, human rights and freedom of the media, including the restoration of Internet access.  The US State Department called on all parties to work to solve the dilemma of declaring an emergency in the country.  This prompted Sergei Kasparov, the famous Russian opposition politician and chess player, to tweet attacking US and Western diplomatic statements calling for calm.  “Will Biden and EU leaders pay attention to a new Soviet-style invasion of Hungary? Or will they continue to babble about diplomatically resolving Putin’s military adventures? Macron, Schulz, Putin support dictatorships around the world, who defends the people?” Kasparov said. ".  This came after the announcement by Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan that the Council of the Collective Security Treaty Organization decided to send peacekeeping forces to Kazakhstan (a member country of the organization) against the backdrop of the security turmoil there.  The decision came in response to an appeal by Kazakh President Kassym Tokayev, leaders of the member states of the organization controlled by Moscow, to help his country in the face of recent violence and unrest.  The importance of Kazakhstan to Washington Kazakhstan's importance stems from its unique location between Russia and China and its richness in energy resources. Since its independence, it has worked to improve its relations with Washington, and has succeeded in doing so greatly.  According to a recent study released by the Congressional Research Service weeks ago, a recent history combines the two countries to rid Kazakhstan of nuclear weapons. Kazakhstan was home to the main nuclear test site of the Soviet Union, an area of ​​6,950 square miles located near the city of Symi (northeast Kazakhstan).  More than 450 nuclear tests were conducted there at the Semipalatinsk test site between 1949 and 1989, and the dissolution of the Soviet Union left Kazakhstan with one of the world's largest nuclear arsenals, including about 1,400 nuclear warheads and more than 100 ICBMs.  But Kazakhstan gave up nuclear weapons and the Soviet warheads that remained on its soil, the last of which were transferred to Russia in 1995 with American help, and Kazakhstan cooperated closely with the United States to secure nuclear materials and dismantle the associated infrastructure.  The United States has provided more than $275 million in assistance in Kazakhstan's efforts to eliminate weapons of mass destruction and related infrastructure since 1991.  Advanced military and security relations During testimony in the Senate in February 2019, the commander of the US Central Command at the time, General Joseph Votel, described US relations with Kazakhstan as "the most mature relationship in Central Asia."  The contacts between the US and Kazakh armies are an important aspect of the bilateral relations between the two countries.  Since 2003, Kazakhstan has hosted multilateral military exercises focused on strengthening the capabilities of peacekeeping forces. In the latest version of these exercises, which was conducted in southeastern Kazakhstan in June 2019, American forces participated in addition to forces from Britain, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, with observers from India and Turkey. and Uzbekistan.  The human rights dilemma US freedom and human rights organizations classify Kazakhstan as not free and undemocratic, and it was not invited to participate in President Biden's summit on democracy in December 2021.  The US State Department has requested $10.7 million in assistance to Kazakhstan in fiscal year 2022, which aims to promote human rights and democratic values ​​by supporting the rule of law, promoting the development of local media, and building the capacity of civil society organizations.

America is the first country to recognize its independence. Why is Kazakhstan a dilemma for Washington?

30 years ago, the United States was the first country to recognize the independence of Kazakhstan after the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991. Since independence, Kazakhstan has pursued a multi-oriented foreign policy and seeks to achieve balance in its relations with major powers, especially as it shares long borders with Russia from the north and China to the east .

However, many experts consider Kazakhstan to be one of the countries in the orbit of Russian influence, and this has complicated US-Kazakh relations, especially in recent years.

Washington and Moscow and the demonstrations

With the outbreak of violence and mass demonstrations protesting the increase in liquefied natural gas prices in many Kazakh cities, some Russian newspapers linked these protests to a role played by foreign hands, in reference to the United States.

American experts believe that Moscow does not want the regime in Kazakhstan to make concessions to the opposition and the demonstrators, at a time when Russian newspapers indicated that what is happening in Kazakhstan is a "dirty trick targeting Moscow" ahead of important talks days later on the Ukraine crisis between Washington, NATO and Russia.

That prompted White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki to say, "There are some crazy Russian claims about the United States being behind this, so let me just take this opportunity to show that it's completely bogus, and obviously part of the Russian disinformation book that we've seen over the course of the year. past years".

On the other hand, a statement issued by the State Department indicated that the US government is closely following the developments in the situation in Kazakhstan.

The statement condemned the acts of violence and destruction of property, and called on the authorities and demonstrators to exercise restraint, and to respect and defend constitutional institutions, human rights and freedom of the media, including the restoration of Internet access.

The US State Department called on all parties to work to solve the dilemma of declaring an emergency in the country.

This prompted Sergei Kasparov, the famous Russian opposition politician and chess player, to tweet attacking US and Western diplomatic statements calling for calm.

“Will Biden and EU leaders pay attention to a new Soviet-style invasion of Hungary? Or will they continue to babble about diplomatically resolving Putin’s military adventures? Macron, Schulz, Putin support dictatorships around the world, who defends the people?” Kasparov said. ".

This came after the announcement by Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan that the Council of the Collective Security Treaty Organization decided to send peacekeeping forces to Kazakhstan (a member country of the organization) against the backdrop of the security turmoil there.

The decision came in response to an appeal by Kazakh President Kassym Tokayev, leaders of the member states of the organization controlled by Moscow, to help his country in the face of recent violence and unrest.

The importance of Kazakhstan to Washington

Kazakhstan's importance stems from its unique location between Russia and China and its richness in energy resources. Since its independence, it has worked to improve its relations with Washington, and has succeeded in doing so greatly.

According to a recent study released by the Congressional Research Service weeks ago, a recent history combines the two countries to rid Kazakhstan of nuclear weapons. Kazakhstan was home to the main nuclear test site of the Soviet Union, an area of ​​6,950 square miles located near the city of Symi (northeast Kazakhstan).

More than 450 nuclear tests were conducted there at the Semipalatinsk test site between 1949 and 1989, and the dissolution of the Soviet Union left Kazakhstan with one of the world's largest nuclear arsenals, including about 1,400 nuclear warheads and more than 100 ICBMs.

But Kazakhstan gave up nuclear weapons and the Soviet warheads that remained on its soil, the last of which were transferred to Russia in 1995 with American help, and Kazakhstan cooperated closely with the United States to secure nuclear materials and dismantle the associated infrastructure.

The United States has provided more than $275 million in assistance in Kazakhstan's efforts to eliminate weapons of mass destruction and related infrastructure since 1991.

Advanced military and security relations

During testimony in the Senate in February 2019, the commander of the US Central Command at the time, General Joseph Votel, described US relations with Kazakhstan as "the most mature relationship in Central Asia."

The contacts between the US and Kazakh armies are an important aspect of the bilateral relations between the two countries.

Since 2003, Kazakhstan has hosted multilateral military exercises focused on strengthening the capabilities of peacekeeping forces. In the latest version of these exercises, which was conducted in southeastern Kazakhstan in June 2019, American forces participated in addition to forces from Britain, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, with observers from India and Turkey. and Uzbekistan.

The human rights dilemma

US freedom and human rights organizations classify Kazakhstan as not free and undemocratic, and it was not invited to participate in President Biden's summit on democracy in December 2021.

The US State Department has requested $10.7 million in assistance to Kazakhstan in fiscal year 2022, which aims to promote human rights and democratic values ​​by supporting the rule of law, promoting the development of local media, and building the capacity of civil society organizations.

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