Near the palace Sudanese security forces fire tear gas at protesters


Near the palace Sudanese security forces fire tear gas at protesters  Sudanese security forces fired tear gas canisters at demonstrators who gathered near the presidential palace, in ongoing protests calling for the return of civilian rule to the country.  On Tuesday, Sudanese security forces fired tear gas canisters at demonstrators against the military coup, after they gathered near the presidential palace in central Khartoum, according to eyewitnesses.  Earlier today, the security authorities in Sudan closed roads in the center of the capital, Khartoum, ahead of the start of demonstrations calling for civilian rule, according to eyewitnesses.  Eyewitnesses said that the army and police forces closed some roads leading to the presidential palace with concrete barriers and barbed wire to prevent the demonstrators from arriving.  The witnesses added that the roads leading to the vicinity of the General Command of the Army also witnessed a closure of concrete barriers, and security forces were deployed in the vicinity of ministries, banks and other vital facilities.  On Monday evening, the authorities closed most of Khartoum's bridges, hours before the start of the demonstrations demanding civilian rule.  The security arrangements came by closing roads and securing government facilities in anticipation of the outbreak of demonstrations called on Monday by a number of "resistance committees" (responsible for organizing demonstrations) in Khartoum to demand "civilian rule" in the country.  And on Sunday, Prime Minister Abdullah Hamdok announced his resignation from his position against the backdrop of the political crisis in the country, saying: "I decided to submit my resignation to make way and return the trust to the Sudanese people."  Hamdok's resignation came after a few hours of protests in Khartoum, during which 3 people were killed and 108 wounded, according to the "Sudan Doctors" (non-governmental) committee.  Since last October 25, Sudan has witnessed protests in response to exceptional measures taken by the army chief, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, most notably the imposition of a state of emergency, the dissolution of the Sovereignty Councils and the transitional ministers, the dismissal of Hamdok and the arrest of officials and politicians.  At the time, Al-Burhan considered his measures “corrective steps for the course of the Sudanese revolution and getting the country out of its crises,” and pledged, in subsequent statements, “to organize free, fair and transparent elections at the specified time (after the end of the transitional period).”  Although Al-Burhan and Hamdok signed a political agreement on November 21, which included the latter’s return to his position, the formation of a government of competencies and the release of political detainees, political forces considered the agreement an “attempt to legitimize the coup” and pledged to continue protests until “full civilian rule” is achieved during the transitional period.

Near the palace Sudanese security forces fire tear gas at protesters


Sudanese security forces fired tear gas canisters at demonstrators who gathered near the presidential palace, in ongoing protests calling for the return of civilian rule to the country.

On Tuesday, Sudanese security forces fired tear gas canisters at demonstrators against the military coup, after they gathered near the presidential palace in central Khartoum, according to eyewitnesses.

Earlier today, the security authorities in Sudan closed roads in the center of the capital, Khartoum, ahead of the start of demonstrations calling for civilian rule, according to eyewitnesses.

Eyewitnesses said that the army and police forces closed some roads leading to the presidential palace with concrete barriers and barbed wire to prevent the demonstrators from arriving.

The witnesses added that the roads leading to the vicinity of the General Command of the Army also witnessed a closure of concrete barriers, and security forces were deployed in the vicinity of ministries, banks and other vital facilities.

On Monday evening, the authorities closed most of Khartoum's bridges, hours before the start of the demonstrations demanding civilian rule.

The security arrangements came by closing roads and securing government facilities in anticipation of the outbreak of demonstrations called on Monday by a number of "resistance committees" (responsible for organizing demonstrations) in Khartoum to demand "civilian rule" in the country.

And on Sunday, Prime Minister Abdullah Hamdok announced his resignation from his position against the backdrop of the political crisis in the country, saying: "I decided to submit my resignation to make way and return the trust to the Sudanese people."

Hamdok's resignation came after a few hours of protests in Khartoum, during which 3 people were killed and 108 wounded, according to the "Sudan Doctors" (non-governmental) committee.

Since last October 25, Sudan has witnessed protests in response to exceptional measures taken by the army chief, Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan, most notably the imposition of a state of emergency, the dissolution of the Sovereignty Councils and the transitional ministers, the dismissal of Hamdok and the arrest of officials and politicians.

At the time, Al-Burhan considered his measures “corrective steps for the course of the Sudanese revolution and getting the country out of its crises,” and pledged, in subsequent statements, “to organize free, fair and transparent elections at the specified time (after the end of the transitional period).”

Although Al-Burhan and Hamdok signed a political agreement on November 21, which included the latter’s return to his position, the formation of a government of competencies and the release of political detainees, political forces considered the agreement an “attempt to legitimize the coup” and pledged to continue protests until “full civilian rule” is achieved during the transitional period.
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