The next revolution in wearable technology in global healthcare

The next revolution in wearable technology in global healthcare Japan's University of Tokyo professor Takao Someya displays the world's lightest and thinnest (2 micrometers) flexible integrated circuits and touch sensor system for stress-free wearable healthcare sensors at a press conference in Tokyo on July 24, 2013. The flexible electrical circuit, one-fifth the thickness of food wrap and weighing less than a feather, could give doctors the chance to implant sensors inside the body. The device can be used to monitor all sorts of physical data, such as body temperature and blood pressure as well as electronic pulses from muscles or the heart.  The healthcare wearable electronics market reached $16.2 billion in 2021 and is expected to reach $30.1 billion in 2026 with a compound annual growth rate of 13.2 percent, MarketsAndMarkets recently reported. .  This market is steadily growing due to the increasing investment of technology companies in the world, in addition to funds and grants, and the growing preference for wireless communication and telemedicine among the world's healthcare providers.  Critical impact of the Corona pandemic The Corona pandemic has greatly increased the demand for remote monitoring solutions and patient engagement in treatment, and most hospitals in the developed world are currently expanding patient monitoring methods to home care settings or other temporary settings to provide optimal care.  The pandemic has also greatly increased the demand for patient monitoring systems, and manufacturers are increasingly focusing on expanding production to meet the growing need for respiratory monitors, blood glucose monitors, heart monitors, temperature, hemodynamic and pressure monitors, and baby monitors. Newborns, and many other cases.  But there is still a lot of room for the development of these devices, especially in the case of monitoring devices for chronic diseases or people who suffer from chronic health conditions, and it comes at the forefront of the required development methods for these devices to be more comfortable and easy to use, especially in cases that require wearing these devices for a relatively long time.  In this context, a recent study conducted by the Canadian University of Waterloo showed that remote monitoring of health behavior using wearable technology is able to help people with complex health conditions, as stated by the “HealthEuropa” platform , which published the most important of what was stated in the study recently. .  Wearable technology can also provide insights into health-related behavior patterns and disease symptoms and progression, allowing researchers to analyze remote individuals in a deeper, more comprehensive and more continuous way.  The study was published in the Journal of Neurology, and was authored by researcher Beth Goodkin and Dr. Van Outegem of the University of Waterloo, as well as other researchers working with the Ontario Neurological Research Initiative.  Wearable technology for research Information from wearable devices can provide insight into patterns of health-related behavior and disease symptoms that occur over days and weeks. This could be important for monitoring disease progression and the impact of treatments, said Karen van Utegem, a researcher in kinesiology and health sciences at the University of Waterloo. It is complementary to the assessments we perform in the clinic or hospital.  "As part of our research program, we are validating new findings from wearable devices and developing ways to communicate this information to patients and clinicians."  Van Outegem explained that "it is very important for clinicians and researchers to understand the environment surrounding patients and the ways in which they interact in their daily lives with this environment, because the behavior of people in the clinic or hospital does not reflect the normal life they live, and from here, wearable devices become pivotal to follow up on pathological conditions and their development." and the feasibility of the treatments and medications provided.  Methods of development and improvement The researchers recruited 39 patients with cerebrovascular or neurodegenerative diseases to wear 5 electronic devices on their ankles, wrists and chest continuously for 7 days at home, as well as in the community they interact with in their normal lives after discharge from the hospital.  For people with a complex health condition, sensors capable of detecting certain behaviors or symptoms that affect their health were used, for example, monitoring weakness of the upper extremities compared to the lower ones, and each of the participants wore at least 3 devices, and a partner was attached to the study. To help them deal with any issues that may arise during the research period.  "Desire to wear technological devices may have been influenced by the support provided to participants during the study," said Beth Goodkin, a doctoral student in kinesiology and health sciences at the University of Waterloo and first author of the paper. When it comes to wearable technology itself, which can enhance users' experience."  "Participants in the study felt that it was important to improve and develop devices to be easier to use and more comfortable, especially if they were worn for long periods, and others focused on the importance of the aesthetic form of devices, and they also mentioned that it is important to make other efforts so that these devices do not interfere or affect the patients' daily activities.  The researcher emphasized that "the overall positive response from the participants and willingness to engage in wearing multiple sensors over an extended period is the necessary first step towards making wearable technology an essential part of treatment in the near future."

The next revolution in wearable technology in global healthcare

Japan's University of Tokyo professor Takao Someya displays the world's lightest and thinnest (2 micrometers) flexible integrated circuits and touch sensor system for stress-free wearable healthcare sensors at a press conference in Tokyo on July 24, 2013. The flexible electrical circuit, one-fifth the thickness of food wrap and weighing less than a feather, could give doctors the chance to implant sensors inside the body. The device can be used to monitor all sorts of physical data, such as body temperature and blood pressure as well as electronic pulses from muscles or the heart.

The healthcare wearable electronics market reached $16.2 billion in 2021 and is expected to reach $30.1 billion in 2026 with a compound annual growth rate of 13.2 percent, MarketsAndMarkets recently reported. .

This market is steadily growing due to the increasing investment of technology companies in the world, in addition to funds and grants, and the growing preference for wireless communication and telemedicine among the world's healthcare providers.

Critical impact of the Corona pandemic

The Corona pandemic has greatly increased the demand for remote monitoring solutions and patient engagement in treatment, and most hospitals in the developed world are currently expanding patient monitoring methods to home care settings or other temporary settings to provide optimal care.

The pandemic has also greatly increased the demand for patient monitoring systems, and manufacturers are increasingly focusing on expanding production to meet the growing need for respiratory monitors, blood glucose monitors, heart monitors, temperature, hemodynamic and pressure monitors, and baby monitors. Newborns, and many other cases.

But there is still a lot of room for the development of these devices, especially in the case of monitoring devices for chronic diseases or people who suffer from chronic health conditions, and it comes at the forefront of the required development methods for these devices to be more comfortable and easy to use, especially in cases that require wearing these devices for a relatively long time.

In this context, a recent study conducted by the Canadian University of Waterloo showed that remote monitoring of health behavior using wearable technology is able to help people with complex health conditions, as stated by the “HealthEuropa” platform , which published the most important of what was stated in the study recently. 

Wearable technology can also provide insights into health-related behavior patterns and disease symptoms and progression, allowing researchers to analyze remote individuals in a deeper, more comprehensive and more continuous way.

The study was published in the Journal of Neurology, and was authored by researcher Beth Goodkin and Dr. Van Outegem of the University of Waterloo, as well as other researchers working with the Ontario Neurological Research Initiative.

Wearable technology for research

Information from wearable devices can provide insight into patterns of health-related behavior and disease symptoms that occur over days and weeks. This could be important for monitoring disease progression and the impact of treatments, said Karen van Utegem, a researcher in kinesiology and health sciences at the University of Waterloo. It is complementary to the assessments we perform in the clinic or hospital.

"As part of our research program, we are validating new findings from wearable devices and developing ways to communicate this information to patients and clinicians."

Van Outegem explained that "it is very important for clinicians and researchers to understand the environment surrounding patients and the ways in which they interact in their daily lives with this environment, because the behavior of people in the clinic or hospital does not reflect the normal life they live, and from here, wearable devices become pivotal to follow up on pathological conditions and their development." and the feasibility of the treatments and medications provided.

Methods of development and improvement

The researchers recruited 39 patients with cerebrovascular or neurodegenerative diseases to wear 5 electronic devices on their ankles, wrists and chest continuously for 7 days at home, as well as in the community they interact with in their normal lives after discharge from the hospital.

For people with a complex health condition, sensors capable of detecting certain behaviors or symptoms that affect their health were used, for example, monitoring weakness of the upper extremities compared to the lower ones, and each of the participants wore at least 3 devices, and a partner was attached to the study. To help them deal with any issues that may arise during the research period.

"Desire to wear technological devices may have been influenced by the support provided to participants during the study," said Beth Goodkin, a doctoral student in kinesiology and health sciences at the University of Waterloo and first author of the paper. When it comes to wearable technology itself, which can enhance users' experience."

"Participants in the study felt that it was important to improve and develop devices to be easier to use and more comfortable, especially if they were worn for long periods, and others focused on the importance of the aesthetic form of devices, and they also mentioned that it is important to make other efforts so that these devices do not interfere or affect the patients' daily activities.

The researcher emphasized that "the overall positive response from the participants and willingness to engage in wearing multiple sensors over an extended period is the necessary first step towards making wearable technology an essential part of treatment in the near future."

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