A Japanese company creates a bracelet that will make you feel pain in the Metaverse

A Japanese company creates a bracelet that will make you feel pain in the Metaverse  Japanese startup H2L has developed a wearable armband that transmits pain to users as they experience Metaverse technology, the British Financial Times reported .  Metaverse technology is the current trend in the field of technology, and many of the biggest names in this field are seeking to find a point of distinction in this field, especially when competitors are the size of "Meta" or "Microsoft".  Fortunately, H2L was already working on this technology even before the advent of metaverses, which is why electronics giant Sony decided to support the startup in this field.  Between real and virtual Amy Tamaki, founder and CEO of H2L, has a health condition that does not allow her to travel and experience what people normally do. So I decided to explore touch techniques to bridge the gap between the virtual and the real world.  According to the report, the Japanese company aims for this project to free humans from the constraints of place, time and body before the end of this decade. It has developed an armband that allows the user to experience the metaverse using touch technology.  The bracelet can detect arm muscle flexion, which allows the avatar to copy the user's movement in metaverses using electrical stimulation, and it can also control arm muscles to feel the sensations of events taking place in the virtual world.  In this way, users can, for example, feel the weight of the objects they are lifting, the force of the ball they are holding, or even the click of a bird on their hand in the virtual world.  By allowing users to feel the pain of metaverses in the real world, Tamaki believes that users can have more authentic metaverse experiences and even feel like they're in the real world, the Financial Times reported.  Sony's big bet This H2L product is already available for sale on their website and can be purchased for as little as $82, but only in Japan so far. Sony backed the project, which raised more than 1 billion yen ($82 million).  With companies like Mita announcing their touch-based glove, interest in such wearables is bound to grow. With Sony's help, the H2L band can be made available in the global market very soon.  It's now up to metaverse builders to build worlds that can take advantage of these technologies.

Japanese startup H2L has developed a wearable armband that transmits pain to users as they experience Metaverse technology, the British Financial Times reported .

Metaverse technology is the current trend in the field of technology, and many of the biggest names in this field are seeking to find a point of distinction in this field, especially when competitors are the size of "Meta" or "Microsoft".

Fortunately, H2L was already working on this technology even before the advent of metaverses, which is why electronics giant Sony decided to support the startup in this field.

Between real and virtual
Amy Tamaki, founder and CEO of H2L, has a health condition that does not allow her to travel and experience what people normally do. So I decided to explore touch techniques to bridge the gap between the virtual and the real world.

According to the report, the Japanese company aims for this project to free humans from the constraints of place, time and body before the end of this decade. It has developed an armband that allows the user to experience the metaverse using touch technology.

The bracelet can detect arm muscle flexion, which allows the avatar to copy the user's movement in metaverses using electrical stimulation, and it can also control arm muscles to feel the sensations of events taking place in the virtual world.

In this way, users can, for example, feel the weight of the objects they are lifting, the force of the ball they are holding, or even the click of a bird on their hand in the virtual world.

By allowing users to feel the pain of metaverses in the real world, Tamaki believes that users can have more authentic metaverse experiences and even feel like they're in the real world, the Financial Times reported.

Sony's big bet
This H2L product is already available for sale on their website and can be purchased for as little as $82, but only in Japan so far. Sony backed the project, which raised more than 1 billion yen ($82 million).

With companies like Mita announcing their touch-based glove, interest in such wearables is bound to grow. With Sony's help, the H2L band can be made available in the global market very soon.

It's now up to metaverse builders to build worlds that can take advantage of these technologies.
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