Death during sleep What causes it?

Death during sleep What causes it?  Several studies indicate that the risk of sudden death for a person with obstructive sleep apnea is highest between midnight and 6 a.m.  Doctors say that sudden night death is relatively rare. What causes it? And what are the risk factors? The answers are in this report. In a report published by the American newspaper " The Wall Street Journal ", writer Alex Janine says that the death of comedian Bob Saget at the age of 65 has sparked controversy about the possibilities and risks of sudden death during sleep after he was found dead in a hotel room, Without announcing the cause of death. Doctors say sleep-related death is a constant concern for patients, especially for those with heart problems.  "Patients come to us terrified at the prospect of dying in sleep," says Rina Mehra, MD, director of sleep disorders research at the Cleveland Clinic.  Sudden nocturnal death is relatively uncommon Doctors explain that sudden nighttime death is relatively uncommon, and can be caused by a variety of factors including stroke, seizures, analgesic overdose, and most often sudden cardiac arrest. Sudden cardiac arrest is responsible for 90% of sudden and unexpected deaths that occur at night, says Sumit Chugh, medical director of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Research Center.  People who have known heart conditions such as coronary artery disease, lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea are at increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest during sleep.  Doctors fear that some patients will postpone their medical appointments due to the pandemic and the recent rapid spread of the omicron mutant. It is possible that they suffer from undiagnosed health conditions. When cases rise, in-person visits decrease and telemedicine consultations increase, according to Ativ Mehrotra, professor of health care policy and medicine at Harvard Medical School, noting that "people are a little bit inclined to postpone the visit until later or decide it's not necessary."  Heart and lung disease and sudden death Dr. Chugh cautions that people with heart and lung disease who take medications that affect the brain, such as sedatives, antidepressants, or pain medications, have an increased risk of dying during sleep. "It's a killer triple," adds Chugh, who has studied sudden cardiac death for 25 years, and recommends that people who fall into this category speak with their doctors to reduce their risk.  Obstructive sleep apnea, one of the most common forms of apnea, causes people to stop breathing for short periods of time during sleep, and is a problem that affects nearly 1 billion people worldwide between the ages of 30 and 69. Researchers estimate that 80% to 90% of adults in the United States with sleep apnea remain undiagnosed, according to Dr. Mehra of the Cleveland Center.  Several studies indicate that the risk of sudden death for a person with obstructive sleep apnea is highest between midnight and 6 a.m. Mehra says that people with obstructive sleep apnea can stop breathing 30 to 60 times an hour while they fall asleep.  Beet juice supplements are useful for heart failure patients The lack of oxygen causes the heart rate to rise According to Chug, the lack of oxygen leads to an increase in heart rate and blood pressure, which increases the risk of sudden cardiac arrest, which has a death rate of about 90%.  Dr. Jack Flair, a Washington-based cardiologist, asserts that during sleep the body is less able to respond to symptoms such as suffocation due to fluid secreted by the lungs or dangerous changes in heart rate.  According to a study published in 2018 in the Journal of the American Heart Association, sudden cardiac deaths account for between 15% and 20% of all deaths globally, and the Corona epidemic may have changed that proportion in recent years. And according to Chug's research for the Oregon Study of Sudden Unexpected Death, it is estimated that approximately 22 percent of sudden cardiac deaths occur during the night.  Reduce the risk of sudden death Doctors say the best way to reduce risk is to take charge of your own health: to take a look at your family's medical history, ask your doctor questions during a general health exam, and arm yourself with information about your body. Chugh notes that your risk of sudden nighttime death is relatively low if you don't have heart or lung disease, sleep apnea or take medications that affect the brain. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle — including eating healthy, exercising regularly and sleeping enough hours — can help reduce this risk.  Adequate sleep is also important, Mahira stresses, and that sleeping less than 7 to 8 hours a night can increase the risk of cardiovascular problems. Flair points out that there is no cause for concern for patients in their twenties and thirties unless they have a history of sudden death in their family, while the risk increases with age.  Routine ECG test According to Dr. Flair, many problems can be diagnosed with a routine ECG test. Dr. Flair advises that your primary care doctor should share your family medical history to help decide if you need to see a specialist. “Identify the potential risks first by answering these questions: Have you ever fainted? Do you feel heavy in your chest during exercise? Do you "Your partner confirms that you stop breathing during sleep? And answering yes to any of these questions means it is wise to consult a doctor."  Increasing access to health care through telemedicine and the use of high blood pressure and heart rate monitors and home tests, including checking whether you are breathing during sleep, makes it easier for patients to overcome the risks.

Death during sleep What causes it?


Several studies indicate that the risk of sudden death for a person with obstructive sleep apnea is highest between midnight and 6 a.m.

Doctors say that sudden night death is relatively rare. What causes it? And what are the risk factors? The answers are in this report.
In a report published by the American newspaper " The Wall Street Journal ", writer Alex Janine says that the death of comedian Bob Saget at the age of 65 has sparked controversy about the possibilities and risks of sudden death during sleep after he was found dead in a hotel room, Without announcing the cause of death. Doctors say sleep-related death is a constant concern for patients, especially for those with heart problems.

"Patients come to us terrified at the prospect of dying in sleep," says Rina Mehra, MD, director of sleep disorders research at the Cleveland Clinic.

Sudden nocturnal death is relatively uncommon
Doctors explain that sudden nighttime death is relatively uncommon, and can be caused by a variety of factors including stroke, seizures, analgesic overdose, and most often sudden cardiac arrest. Sudden cardiac arrest is responsible for 90% of sudden and unexpected deaths that occur at night, says Sumit Chugh, medical director of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Research Center.

People who have known heart conditions such as coronary artery disease, lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea are at increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest during sleep.

Doctors fear that some patients will postpone their medical appointments due to the pandemic and the recent rapid spread of the omicron mutant. It is possible that they suffer from undiagnosed health conditions. When cases rise, in-person visits decrease and telemedicine consultations increase, according to Ativ Mehrotra, professor of health care policy and medicine at Harvard Medical School, noting that "people are a little bit inclined to postpone the visit until later or decide it's not necessary."

Heart and lung disease and sudden death
Dr. Chugh cautions that people with heart and lung disease who take medications that affect the brain, such as sedatives, antidepressants, or pain medications, have an increased risk of dying during sleep. "It's a killer triple," adds Chugh, who has studied sudden cardiac death for 25 years, and recommends that people who fall into this category speak with their doctors to reduce their risk.

Obstructive sleep apnea, one of the most common forms of apnea, causes people to stop breathing for short periods of time during sleep, and is a problem that affects nearly 1 billion people worldwide between the ages of 30 and 69. Researchers estimate that 80% to 90% of adults in the United States with sleep apnea remain undiagnosed, according to Dr. Mehra of the Cleveland Center.

Several studies indicate that the risk of sudden death for a person with obstructive sleep apnea is highest between midnight and 6 a.m. Mehra says that people with obstructive sleep apnea can stop breathing 30 to 60 times an hour while they fall asleep.

Beet juice supplements are useful for heart failure patients
The lack of oxygen causes the heart rate to rise
According to Chug, the lack of oxygen leads to an increase in heart rate and blood pressure, which increases the risk of sudden cardiac arrest, which has a death rate of about 90%.

Dr. Jack Flair, a Washington-based cardiologist, asserts that during sleep the body is less able to respond to symptoms such as suffocation due to fluid secreted by the lungs or dangerous changes in heart rate.

According to a study published in 2018 in the Journal of the American Heart Association, sudden cardiac deaths account for between 15% and 20% of all deaths globally, and the Corona epidemic may have changed that proportion in recent years. And according to Chug's research for the Oregon Study of Sudden Unexpected Death, it is estimated that approximately 22 percent of sudden cardiac deaths occur during the night.

Reduce the risk of sudden death
Doctors say the best way to reduce risk is to take charge of your own health: to take a look at your family's medical history, ask your doctor questions during a general health exam, and arm yourself with information about your body. Chugh notes that your risk of sudden nighttime death is relatively low if you don't have heart or lung disease, sleep apnea or take medications that affect the brain. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle — including eating healthy, exercising regularly and sleeping enough hours — can help reduce this risk.

Adequate sleep is also important, Mahira stresses, and that sleeping less than 7 to 8 hours a night can increase the risk of cardiovascular problems.
Flair points out that there is no cause for concern for patients in their twenties and thirties unless they have a history of sudden death in their family, while the risk increases with age.

Routine ECG test
According to Dr. Flair, many problems can be diagnosed with a routine ECG test. Dr. Flair advises that your primary care doctor should share your family medical history to help decide if you need to see a specialist. “Identify the potential risks first by answering these questions: Have you ever fainted? Do you feel heavy in your chest during exercise? Do you "Your partner confirms that you stop breathing during sleep? And answering yes to any of these questions means it is wise to consult a doctor."

Increasing access to health care through telemedicine and the use of high blood pressure and heart rate monitors and home tests, including checking whether you are breathing during sleep, makes it easier for patients to overcome the risks.
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