Europe demands an investigation into Bucha's crimes and Moscow: We will present documents that prove the opposite

Europe demands an investigation into Bucha's crimes and Moscow: We will present documents that prove the opposite Western countries have called for an investigation into Russian forces' perpetration of "war crimes" in the Kyiv region, accusations that Moscow has denied, in what Ukraine has described as a "genocide". Russia said it would provide "documents" showing the "true nature" of the events in Bucha.  Western countries called on Monday for an investigation into Russian forces' perpetration of "war crimes" in the Kyiv region, accusations Moscow denied were true in what Ukraine called a "genocide".  Several Western countries and the United Nations expressed their condemnation of the scenes from Bucha, which the Ukrainian President visited on Monday, and located in the outskirts of Kyiv after the withdrawal of Russian forces from it, which showed several bodies of civilians on the roads or in mass graves.  The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Michelle Bachelet, condemned the "horrific" scenes and considered that the information received "raises serious and worrying questions about the possibility of war crimes and serious violations of international humanitarian law," calling for "all evidence to be preserved."   "The true nature of events"  In response, Russia said it would provide "documents" showing, it said, the "true nature" of the events in the Ukrainian city of Bucha.  "Today, through our permanent representative (to the United Nations), we will organize a press conference, during which documents will be presented on the true nature of events," Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said.  He pointed out that the press conference will be held at 19:30 GMT at the United Nations Headquarters in New York.  Lavrov considered the photos to be "fake", denouncing the "propaganda" and "disinformation" campaign.   On Monday, US President Joe Biden called for "Putin to be tried for war crimes" after the discovery of many bodies in civilian clothes in Bucha, near Kiev, and told reporters he wanted to impose "additional sanctions" on Russia.  The US President reiterated that he considers his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin a "war criminal", stressing the need to "hold him accountable."   British Foreign Secretary Liz Truss said on Monday it was "very clear" that Russian forces had committed war crimes against civilians in Ukraine.  "We are all appalled by the scenes in Bucha, the massacre, the clear evidence of sexual crimes, the targeting of innocent civilians and it is very clear that war crimes have been committed," Trass told a news conference in Poland.  "As for the issue of genocide, it is a matter for the courts to decide," she added.  Zelensky in Bucha  On Monday, Zelensky visited Bucha, where he denounced "war crimes" that took place and "will be recognized as genocide," which was referred to earlier by Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez and his Polish counterpart Mateusz Morawiecki.  "Thousands of people were tortured and killed by the Russians," Zelensky said, referring to "the dismemberment of limbs, the rape of women and the killing of children."   The Russian forces had taken control of Bucha and Irbin, adjacent to and adjacent to Kiev from the northwest, shortly after the start of the Russian attack on Ukraine on February 24. In the following weeks, the two cities witnessed violent battles that caused great destruction and the displacement of the majority of the population.  Ukrainian forces announced that they had recaptured the two cities in recent days, after the Russians announced easing the noose around Kyiv and northern Ukraine to focus military efforts in the east of the country.

Western countries have called for an investigation into Russian forces' perpetration of "war crimes" in the Kyiv region, accusations that Moscow has denied, in what Ukraine has described as a "genocide". Russia said it would provide "documents" showing the "true nature" of the events in Bucha.

Western countries called on Monday for an investigation into Russian forces' perpetration of "war crimes" in the Kyiv region, accusations Moscow denied were true in what Ukraine called a "genocide".

Several Western countries and the United Nations expressed their condemnation of the scenes from Bucha, which the Ukrainian President visited on Monday, and located in the outskirts of Kyiv after the withdrawal of Russian forces from it, which showed several bodies of civilians on the roads or in mass graves.

The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Michelle Bachelet, condemned the "horrific" scenes and considered that the information received "raises serious and worrying questions about the possibility of war crimes and serious violations of international humanitarian law," calling for "all evidence to be preserved."

"The true nature of events"
In response, Russia said it would provide "documents" showing, it said, the "true nature" of the events in the Ukrainian city of Bucha.

"Today, through our permanent representative (to the United Nations), we will organize a press conference, during which documents will be presented on the true nature of events," Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said.

He pointed out that the press conference will be held at 19:30 GMT at the United Nations Headquarters in New York.

Lavrov considered the photos to be "fake", denouncing the "propaganda" and "disinformation" campaign.

On Monday, US President Joe Biden called for "Putin to be tried for war crimes" after the discovery of many bodies in civilian clothes in Bucha, near Kiev, and told reporters he wanted to impose "additional sanctions" on Russia.

The US President reiterated that he considers his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin a "war criminal", stressing the need to "hold him accountable."

British Foreign Secretary Liz Truss said on Monday it was "very clear" that Russian forces had committed war crimes against civilians in Ukraine.

"We are all appalled by the scenes in Bucha, the massacre, the clear evidence of sexual crimes, the targeting of innocent civilians and it is very clear that war crimes have been committed," Trass told a news conference in Poland.

"As for the issue of genocide, it is a matter for the courts to decide," she added.

Zelensky in Bucha
On Monday, Zelensky visited Bucha, where he denounced "war crimes" that took place and "will be recognized as genocide," which was referred to earlier by Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez and his Polish counterpart Mateusz Morawiecki.

"Thousands of people were tortured and killed by the Russians," Zelensky said, referring to "the dismemberment of limbs, the rape of women and the killing of children."

The Russian forces had taken control of Bucha and Irbin, adjacent to and adjacent to Kiev from the northwest, shortly after the start of the Russian attack on Ukraine on February 24. In the following weeks, the two cities witnessed violent battles that caused great destruction and the displacement of the majority of the population.

Ukrainian forces announced that they had recaptured the two cities in recent days, after the Russians announced easing the noose around Kyiv and northern Ukraine to focus military efforts in the east of the country.
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