For these reasons stay away from these foods in Ramadan

For these reasons stay away from these foods in Ramadan  Doctors advise the fasting person in Ramadan to take care of his diet more than normal days, as the imbalance of the diet during the blessed month of Ramadan and restricting it to breakfast and suhoor meals may cause the body to feel some discomfort, the severity of which increases if the fasting person eats specific types of dishes and sweets, according to the Hamad Medical Corporation. in Qatar.  Therefore, it is recommended to avoid some foods and stay away from them during the holy month, including but not limited to:  Fries and greasy foods such as French fries and samosas, because they contain a very high percentage of calories and are devoid of nutrients. Eating them in abundance may cause an imbalance in the diet, and thus increase the fatigue and exhaustion resulting from fasting in Ramadan. Foods that contain high amounts of salt, such as pickles, may cause dehydration of the body through their ability to absorb fluids that enter it in limited quantities throughout the fasting period. Foods that contain large amounts of sugar, as a source rich in calories but poor in nutritional values. It is true that these dishes provide the body with instant energy, but this energy does not last long and may go away at any moment. Foods containing chocolate or another source of caffeine as a diuretic. Too much of this substance in the body may lose the fluids, salts and valuable minerals that it needs during the day. Eggplant with cheese Ramadan health and wages Ramadan trip Source: Primary Health Care  Providing the body of the fasting person with nutrients According to the Deutsche Welle report , in Ramadan, experts advise providing the body with all the essential nutrients it needs, by focusing on consuming high-quality foods, according to the following:  Suhoor For Suhoor, Ayaz Safi, a nutrition expert at Westminster University in London, advises in an article for the Australian website "The Conversation" to focus on eating foods with a low glycemic index (that do not raise blood sugar quickly), such as foods made from cereals. Whole fruits and vegetables including oats, barley, brown rice, quinoa, berries, apples and oranges.  He explains why, "These foods won't spike your blood sugar and will help you feel fuller for longer. This can also help you control your appetite throughout the day."  The breakfast As for breakfast, nutrition experts advise eating light foods rich in liquids and light sugars at first. "After a long fast, the first meal should be light and contain foods that contain liquids and some sugar," says nutrition expert Rashi Chowdhury, quoted by The Indian Express.  Safi agrees with him, who advises drinking water at breakfast, in addition to eating a good amount of vegetables, and the proteins found in dairy products. "Having these nutrients in your meals helps keep you hydrated and satiated for longer, and can boost your immune system, which is especially important this year," he says.  What to avoid Safi also advises avoiding excessive consumption of things such as salt, caffeine and fast food. He explains, "When preparing meals, it is important to make sure that you avoid excessive salt intake because this will cause you to become dehydrated and make you feel thirsty during the day. Caffeine should also be avoided, because caffeinated drinks have a diuretic effect, which increases the body's production of urine, which in turn It may lead to dehydration."  It should also be avoided, according to Safi, from fast ready meals, "because the density of nutrients in them is relatively low, and excessive consumption of these types of foods may lead to weight gain and diseases in the heart and kidneys."  What about sports in Ramadan? Experts Safi and Choudhury advise avoiding strenuous exercises such as jogging or lifting weights during the day of fasting, noting that this can be done in the evening after breaking the fast.  Instead, Safi advises, do 15 to 30 minutes of light exercise a day, such as walking or yoga. "Try a walk around the park or garden, or take a short walk, walking is the easiest form of exercise to fit into your day while fasting," he says.

Doctors advise the fasting person in Ramadan to take care of his diet more than normal days, as the imbalance of the diet during the blessed month of Ramadan and restricting it to breakfast and suhoor meals may cause the body to feel some discomfort, the severity of which increases if the fasting person eats specific types of dishes and sweets, according to the Hamad Medical Corporation. in Qatar.

Therefore, it is recommended to avoid some foods and stay away from them during the holy month, including but not limited to:

Fries and greasy foods such as French fries and samosas, because they contain a very high percentage of calories and are devoid of nutrients. Eating them in abundance may cause an imbalance in the diet, and thus increase the fatigue and exhaustion resulting from fasting in Ramadan.
Foods that contain high amounts of salt, such as pickles, may cause dehydration of the body through their ability to absorb fluids that enter it in limited quantities throughout the fasting period.
Foods that contain large amounts of sugar, as a source rich in calories but poor in nutritional values. It is true that these dishes provide the body with instant energy, but this energy does not last long and may go away at any moment.
Foods containing chocolate or another source of caffeine as a diuretic. Too much of this substance in the body may lose the fluids, salts and valuable minerals that it needs during the day.
Eggplant with cheese Ramadan health and wages Ramadan trip Source: Primary Health Care

Providing the body of the fasting person with nutrients
According to the Deutsche Welle report , in Ramadan, experts advise providing the body with all the essential nutrients it needs, by focusing on consuming high-quality foods, according to the following:

Suhoor
For Suhoor, Ayaz Safi, a nutrition expert at Westminster University in London, advises in an article for the Australian website "The Conversation" to focus on eating foods with a low glycemic index (that do not raise blood sugar quickly), such as foods made from cereals. Whole fruits and vegetables including oats, barley, brown rice, quinoa, berries, apples and oranges.

He explains why, "These foods won't spike your blood sugar and will help you feel fuller for longer. This can also help you control your appetite throughout the day."

The breakfast
As for breakfast, nutrition experts advise eating light foods rich in liquids and light sugars at first. "After a long fast, the first meal should be light and contain foods that contain liquids and some sugar," says nutrition expert Rashi Chowdhury, quoted by The Indian Express.

Safi agrees with him, who advises drinking water at breakfast, in addition to eating a good amount of vegetables, and the proteins found in dairy products. "Having these nutrients in your meals helps keep you hydrated and satiated for longer, and can boost your immune system, which is especially important this year," he says.

What to avoid
Safi also advises avoiding excessive consumption of things such as salt, caffeine and fast food. He explains, "When preparing meals, it is important to make sure that you avoid excessive salt intake because this will cause you to become dehydrated and make you feel thirsty during the day. Caffeine should also be avoided, because caffeinated drinks have a diuretic effect, which increases the body's production of urine, which in turn It may lead to dehydration."

It should also be avoided, according to Safi, from fast ready meals, "because the density of nutrients in them is relatively low, and excessive consumption of these types of foods may lead to weight gain and diseases in the heart and kidneys."

What about sports in Ramadan?
Experts Safi and Choudhury advise avoiding strenuous exercises such as jogging or lifting weights during the day of fasting, noting that this can be done in the evening after breaking the fast.

Instead, Safi advises, do 15 to 30 minutes of light exercise a day, such as walking or yoga. "Try a walk around the park or garden, or take a short walk, walking is the easiest form of exercise to fit into your day while fasting," he says.
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