Qatar will win the 2022 World Cup unlike what we imagined

Qatar will win the 2022 World Cup unlike what we imagined  Jakarta (ANTARA) - The 2022 World Cup in Qatar in November will be unlike its predecessors as the hosts face logistical challenges such as providing enough accommodation to cope with unruly fans.  Qatar, which is roughly the size of Jamaica, is also the smallest country to host the major football tournament with fans from 32 countries watching the match at eight stadiums located around the capital Doha.  One of the positives is that fans will be able to reach the entire match arena with ease, increasing the chances of seeing more than one match per day.  This contrasts with the experience in Russia and Brazil where spectators often have to fly to watch matches in other cities.  However, it also means Qatar's accommodation market will be overcrowded. Organizers estimate 1.2 fans will arrive in the country during the 28 days of the tournament.  FIFA president Gianni Infantino, who inherited the decision to allow Qatar to host after replacing scandal-ridden Sepp Blatter, initially saw a possibility for the country -Neighboring countries in the region to share the task of holding the tournament.  However, that option was overturned and Infantino still wants to portray the World Cup as an opportunity for fans to experience the wider Arab world.  "There will be accommodation for everyone who wants to live in Qatar, but maybe someone wants to experience a day in Dubai or Abu Dhabi or Muscat or Riyadh or Jeddah or anywhere in the region and they will have the opportunity to go and visit other countries during live in this area," Infantino said in an interview with Reuters.  "That's what we definitely recommend as well, because I think one of the greatest experiences at this World Cup... is the opportunity for people to come to a country and be part of a world they may not know about," he said.  A reasonable suggestion, but it only applies to those with deep pockets, not to mention against the efforts of the organizers in Qatar who want to make this World Cup affordable for fans on a tight budget.  Upper limit on lodging prices Reuters journalist Simon Evans reports from Doha that the committee has also set an upper limit on the price of hotel rooms for the fans, with the most expensive three-star room priced at 120 US dollars.  The Qatari government pledged 130,000 rooms, including hotels and 60,000 rooms in apartments and villas, plus about 4,000 rooms on two cruise ships and the rest in supporters' homestays.  Local officials are also trying to ensure fans, accustomed to drinking beer while watching a game, have alternatives to hotel bars for expats where a pint can cost as much as $18.  While alcohol is usually available at these venues, organizers set up special fan zones at various places during the tournament so fans can watch the match and drink at more familiar prices.  "The price of alcohol will be limited in that fan zone, similar to what was made at the 2019 FIFA Club World Cup where a pint can is around £5," a Reuters source said.  The fan zone and all arenas will have to be able to accommodate fans from 32 countries, unlike in most tournaments where the host countries welcome guests from only two countries.  "I'm sure the large number of foreign nationals and people coming and mingling will be very beneficial, and will also make and elevate the World Cup to a truly great social gathering," Infantino said.  The grand meeting will also require skilled police and security officers considering the history of football tournaments cannot be separated from fan clashes.

Jakarta (ANTARA) - The 2022 World Cup in Qatar in November will be unlike its predecessors as the hosts face logistical challenges such as providing enough accommodation to cope with unruly fans.

Qatar, which is roughly the size of Jamaica, is also the smallest country to host the major football tournament with fans from 32 countries watching the match at eight stadiums located around the capital Doha.

One of the positives is that fans will be able to reach the entire match arena with ease, increasing the chances of seeing more than one match per day.

This contrasts with the experience in Russia and Brazil where spectators often have to fly to watch matches in other cities.

However, it also means Qatar's accommodation market will be overcrowded. Organizers estimate 1.2 fans will arrive in the country during the 28 days of the tournament.

FIFA president Gianni Infantino, who inherited the decision to allow Qatar to host after replacing scandal-ridden Sepp Blatter, initially saw a possibility for the country -Neighboring countries in the region to share the task of holding the tournament.

However, that option was overturned and Infantino still wants to portray the World Cup as an opportunity for fans to experience the wider Arab world.

"There will be accommodation for everyone who wants to live in Qatar, but maybe someone wants to experience a day in Dubai or Abu Dhabi or Muscat or Riyadh or Jeddah or anywhere in the region and they will have the opportunity to go and visit other countries during live in this area," Infantino said in an interview with Reuters.

"That's what we definitely recommend as well, because I think one of the greatest experiences at this World Cup... is the opportunity for people to come to a country and be part of a world they may not know about," he said.

A reasonable suggestion, but it only applies to those with deep pockets, not to mention against the efforts of the organizers in Qatar who want to make this World Cup affordable for fans on a tight budget.

Upper limit on lodging prices
Reuters journalist Simon Evans reports from Doha that the committee has also set an upper limit on the price of hotel rooms for the fans, with the most expensive three-star room priced at 120 US dollars.

The Qatari government pledged 130,000 rooms, including hotels and 60,000 rooms in apartments and villas, plus about 4,000 rooms on two cruise ships and the rest in supporters' homestays.

Local officials are also trying to ensure fans, accustomed to drinking beer while watching a game, have alternatives to hotel bars for expats where a pint can cost as much as $18.

While alcohol is usually available at these venues, organizers set up special fan zones at various places during the tournament so fans can watch the match and drink at more familiar prices.

"The price of alcohol will be limited in that fan zone, similar to what was made at the 2019 FIFA Club World Cup where a pint can is around £5," a Reuters source said.

The fan zone and all arenas will have to be able to accommodate fans from 32 countries, unlike in most tournaments where the host countries welcome guests from only two countries.

"I'm sure the large number of foreign nationals and people coming and mingling will be very beneficial, and will also make and elevate the World Cup to a truly great social gathering," Infantino said.

The grand meeting will also require skilled police and security officers considering the history of football tournaments cannot be separated from fan clashes.
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