The arrival of robots in the classroom Is the era of professors over?

Not so long ago, having robots in schools was just science fiction, but advances in robotics and artificial intelligence have made these machines allies of teachers who are at risk of replacing them in the future.

In his article published in the French newspaper "la-croix", writer Denis Peron said that robots in Europe and Asia are gradually beginning to occupy a place in the classroom, but these robots equipped with sensors and programmed to interact independently are almost like humans.

The author shows that robots appeared in some schools in the early 2000s in order to help students understand how they work, as expert Antonin Koes explains, "Robots were used to help students understand that their movement is not magic, but rather depends on human-created algorithms."

The writer points out that these machines make the mathematical logic more realistic, for example, students have to ask the robot to spin or fetch something, but if they make programming errors, the robot will fail to accomplish its task.

The arrival of robots in the classroom Is the era of professors over?  Not so long ago, having robots in schools was just science fiction, but advances in robotics and artificial intelligence have made these machines allies of teachers who are at risk of replacing them in the future.  In his article published in the French newspaper "la-croix", writer Denis Peron said that robots in Europe and Asia are gradually beginning to occupy a place in the classroom, but these robots equipped with sensors and programmed to interact independently are almost like humans.  The author shows that robots appeared in some schools in the early 2000s in order to help students understand how they work, as expert Antonin Koes explains, "Robots were used to help students understand that their movement is not magic, but rather depends on human-created algorithms."  The writer points out that these machines make the mathematical logic more realistic, for example, students have to ask the robot to spin or fetch something, but if they make programming errors, the robot will fail to accomplish its task.  Giving meaning to coding “Participants should design robots that play soccer, present a show, or perform rescue missions to add meaning to coding,” says Stefan Brunel, professor of engineering sciences and organizer of RoboCap (the world’s largest robotics competition with 450 teams, 90% of whom are schoolchildren). ".  The writer adds that robots facilitate learning and even make it possible through attendance rather than students. “These machines give disabled or sick students the ability not to miss classes,” says Frank Anjou, the founding president of Eczema, a robotics company that signed a contract with France's national education system to supply about 500 machines.  Frank Anjou continues, "From his home or hospital, (the student) controls his avatar using the joystick, where he can move it, and thanks to a light signal, he can ask for the word in class."  The writer states that the robot can also act as a teacher’s assistant. Didier Roy, a member of the French Institute for Research in Computer Science and Automation (INRIA), says, “Robots can say the date every morning, as sometimes happens in South Korea, or answer encyclopedic questions for students, Or provide the most appropriate series of exercises with the help of artificial intelligence.”  A robot instead of a teacher? But does this mean that a robot bought for a few thousand euros can one day replace the professor?  In this regard, Didier Roy, a former secondary teacher, does not believe this, as he explained that “the student needs to feel that his teacher has confidence in his abilities and wants to follow his progress,” while Margarida Romero, professor of education sciences at the University of Nice, confirms this, saying that “some robots It is able to recognize students' feelings and measure their level of attention, and also has the advantage of being able to tirelessly repeat the definition of some concepts, and can give the student the impression that he is not under any control or control.But in the end, it is the teacher who makes the difference, so the teacher's profession is One of the hardest jobs to automate.  The author quotes expert Mary Caroline Messier's warning that "by presenting robots as a threat to the profession, we risk depriving teachers and students of a valuable learning aid."  The writer pointed out that, in order to enhance the learning of the English language, the National Education recently accelerated the deployment of “Captain Kelly” in primary school, a voice assistant capable of answering students’ questions, similar to the Google Assistant (Alexa), and the robot played a role in “compensating shortcomings of some teachers.  Algorithms to adapt to students' needs As Thierry de Vulbilier, managing director and co-founder of private company Evidence.b, says about his company's curricula, "My company develops curricula, particularly in mathematics, based on adaptive learning. With a group of about 5,000 An exercise that makes it possible for algorithms to adapt to each student's needs, by introducing the elements best able to help them advance in certain subjects."  He adds that the algorithms "over time divide students into groups according to their profile, and make it possible to determine which courses are of interest to them".


Giving meaning to coding
“Participants should design robots that play soccer, present a show, or perform rescue missions to add meaning to coding,” says Stefan Brunel, professor of engineering sciences and organizer of RoboCap (the world’s largest robotics competition with 450 teams, 90% of whom are schoolchildren). ".

The writer adds that robots facilitate learning and even make it possible through attendance rather than students. “These machines give disabled or sick students the ability not to miss classes,” says Frank Anjou, the founding president of Eczema, a robotics company that signed a contract with France's national education system to supply about 500 machines.

Frank Anjou continues, "From his home or hospital, (the student) controls his avatar using the joystick, where he can move it, and thanks to a light signal, he can ask for the word in class."

The writer states that the robot can also act as a teacher’s assistant. Didier Roy, a member of the French Institute for Research in Computer Science and Automation (INRIA), says, “Robots can say the date every morning, as sometimes happens in South Korea, or answer encyclopedic questions for students, Or provide the most appropriate series of exercises with the help of artificial intelligence.”

A robot instead of a teacher?
But does this mean that a robot bought for a few thousand euros can one day replace the professor?

In this regard, Didier Roy, a former secondary teacher, does not believe this, as he explained that “the student needs to feel that his teacher has confidence in his abilities and wants to follow his progress,” while Margarida Romero, professor of education sciences at the University of Nice, confirms this, saying that “some robots It is able to recognize students' feelings and measure their level of attention, and also has the advantage of being able to tirelessly repeat the definition of some concepts, and can give the student the impression that he is not under any control or control.But in the end, it is the teacher who makes the difference, so the teacher's profession is One of the hardest jobs to automate.

The author quotes expert Mary Caroline Messier's warning that "by presenting robots as a threat to the profession, we risk depriving teachers and students of a valuable learning aid."

The writer pointed out that, in order to enhance the learning of the English language, the National Education recently accelerated the deployment of “Captain Kelly” in primary school, a voice assistant capable of answering students’ questions, similar to the Google Assistant (Alexa), and the robot played a role in “compensating shortcomings of some teachers.

Algorithms to adapt to students' needs
As Thierry de Vulbilier, managing director and co-founder of private company Evidence.b, says about his company's curricula, "My company develops curricula, particularly in mathematics, based on adaptive learning. With a group of about 5,000 An exercise that makes it possible for algorithms to adapt to each student's needs, by introducing the elements best able to help them advance in certain subjects."

He adds that the algorithms "over time divide students into groups according to their profile, and make it possible to determine which courses are of interest to them".
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