Family members of journalists are under threat

On April 21, a group with an ancient Burmese mannequin with a tattooed cat and two blooded swords appeared on social media. Eight NLD members and suspected party supporters were brutally arrested and killed in Mandalay after the incident.

On April 25, NLD supporters and supporters of the revolution took part in a blood-drinking group telegram. The Irrawaddy Mizzima Reporters from DVB and The Irrawaddy Times; Editors' families need to be killed.

The threat of this blood group. Targeted modern media editor Ko Tha Lun Zaw said the group's actions were in one way or another linked to the military authorities.

"We started posting on the Telegram on April 21 and issued statements announcing that the killings would take place. We, the media, also threatened them. The bloodthirsty group was linked to the military.

Photographs obtained by RFA show that bloody labels were left near the victims. Tatmadaw supporters A study of former nationalist activists' social networking sites revealed that the labels were posted on their personal social media pages.

"He does not want people who value the freedom of the press, who criticize the military, who seek the truth, and what the actions of the military council are all about."

General Zaw Min Tun, a spokesman for the military council, said the military had nothing to do with the blood group. In rural areas, the militia has officially formed the only militia, he told a news conference on April 27.

The bloodshed is threatening to target not only the insurgents and the rebels, but also the media, as military junta officials openly criticize the media.


Family members of journalists are under threat  On April 21, a group with an ancient Burmese mannequin with a tattooed cat and two blooded swords appeared on social media. Eight NLD members and suspected party supporters were brutally arrested and killed in Mandalay after the incident.  On April 25, NLD supporters and supporters of the revolution took part in a blood-drinking group telegram. The Irrawaddy Mizzima Reporters from DVB and The Irrawaddy Times; Editors' families need to be killed.  The threat of this blood group. Targeted modern media editor Ko Tha Lun Zaw said the group's actions were in one way or another linked to the military authorities.  "We started posting on the Telegram on April 21 and issued statements announcing that the killings would take place. We, the media, also threatened them. The bloodthirsty group was linked to the military.  Photographs obtained by RFA show that bloody labels were left near the victims. Tatmadaw supporters A study of former nationalist activists' social networking sites revealed that the labels were posted on their personal social media pages.  "He does not want people who value the freedom of the press, who criticize the military, who seek the truth, and what the actions of the military council are all about."  General Zaw Min Tun, a spokesman for the military council, said the military had nothing to do with the blood group. In rural areas, the militia has officially formed the only militia, he told a news conference on April 27.  The bloodshed is threatening to target not only the insurgents and the rebels, but also the media, as military junta officials openly criticize the media.  At a press conference in Naypyidaw on April 27, General Zaw Min Tun, a spokesman for the military council, accused some of the media of being exile media and projected the coverage of seven media outlets.    Modern media, including Voice of Asia (RFA), which broadcasts the news of the Revolution Thingyan, spoke at the press conference. The Irrawaddy Mizzima The DVB and The Irrawaddy Times were shown on the projector, which was seen as an act of genocide.  "In the pre-Thingyan period, more than 55 local and foreign media outlets wrote about 55 articles inciting the destruction of the Great Thingyan Festival. These are their writings.  U Myint Kyaw, a journalist, said that the military junta's use of force against journalists and their families, as well as the threat posed by the military authorities, was the lowest level of media freedom that has ever been achieved.  "We can say that we have the same views because we think that the media supports them. We think they are writing against them. We have the same views on the media as the bloodthirsty people said earlier. We do not know if there is any direct connection. "It's unprecedented."  Sein Win, executive editor of Mizzima News, said that the military council and pro-military armed groups, both pro-military and pro-military groups, have been targeting the media and journalists who report badly on the junta, and that the cycle will continue as long as the times are bad.  "People who value the freedom of the press, who criticize the military, who seek the truth, who do not want it, do not want it. Prisoners will be arrested, some will be found alive. The main reason is that a military coup is as long as democracy remains.   One observer of the media's Freedom of the Press warns that journalists in Burma lack legal protection and are losing out.  "Right now, in a nutshell, the freedom of the media is not protected by international standards or the law. Some are threatened, some are arrested, some are still dead. More and more are coming down.  So far, more than 50 journalists have been arrested, not under the Media Law, but under the Penal Code.  Myanmar Now, which regularly reports on democracy and human rights abuses; DVB New age 7 Days Mizzima Myitkyina Journal The 74 Media; Tachileik News Agency Delta News Agency; Zeyar Times News Agency and Kamaryut Media were suspended their business licenses shortly after the military coup in 2021.  According to the Reporters Without Borders (RSF) index, Burma's press freedom ranks 140 out of 180 countries since the military coup on February 1, 2021, and is at a worrying red level for the media.     Malaysian PM says he has contacts with NUG government  Malaysian Foreign Minister Saifuddin Abdullah says the Malaysian government has been in contact with the elected National Unity Government (NUG) after the military coup. This is the first time an Asean leader has made such a statement.  The report was first reported by BenarNews, and Malaysian Foreign Minister Saifuddin said in response to an open letter from the ASEAN Parliamentary Group on Human Rights (APHR) that no action had been taken on Asean's five-point peace process. He also urged the NUG to engage with the government.  The APHR letter also called on ASEAN to hold formal talks with the NUG government elected by the people of Burma as soon as possible. Malaysian Foreign Minister Saifuddin said on his Twitter account that he had met informally with the chairman of the NUGC National Unity Advisory Council (NUCC).  At the NUCC, representatives of the NUG National Unity Government; Civil society organizations; Tribal armed groups are involved. For the first time, a senior official acknowledged that there had been secret contacts between some Asean members and the NUG, as well as the Malaysian foreign minister's Twitter account.  Similarly, the implementation of the ASEAN Five-Point Agreement has been slow for about a year, and some Southeast Asian governments have begun to engage more directly and directly with the NUG.     Last week, on the one-year anniversary of the five-point ASEAN Agreement, human rights activists in the region and Burma called for an inclusive dialogue aimed at ending violence in Burma. At present, the political outcome is small. That is why some have called for an inclusive dialogue to mark the anniversary of the ASEAN Accords to end the violence in Burma.   The problem, however, is that if Asean enters into the talks with sincerity and optimism, it will not benefit the coup d'état of Burma and its power will be weakened. According to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP), at least 1,798 people have been killed in areas of military conflict across the country.   An open letter from the ASEAN Parliamentary Group on Human Rights (APHR) states that ASEAN should put more pressure on the Burmese military after a year of inaction by the military council. This year, military leader Min Aung Hlaing failed to implement any of the five-point ASEAN agreement. In addition, he committed crimes against the people of Burma. He said it was time for Asean to impose sanctions on him for failing to address the region.


At a press conference in Naypyidaw on April 27, General Zaw Min Tun, a spokesman for the military council, accused some of the media of being exile media and projected the coverage of seven media outlets.

Modern media, including Voice of Asia (RFA), which broadcasts the news of the Revolution Thingyan, spoke at the press conference. The Irrawaddy Mizzima The DVB and The Irrawaddy Times were shown on the projector, which was seen as an act of genocide.

"In the pre-Thingyan period, more than 55 local and foreign media outlets wrote about 55 articles inciting the destruction of the Great Thingyan Festival. These are their writings.

U Myint Kyaw, a journalist, said that the military junta's use of force against journalists and their families, as well as the threat posed by the military authorities, was the lowest level of media freedom that has ever been achieved.

"We can say that we have the same views because we think that the media supports them. We think they are writing against them. We have the same views on the media as the bloodthirsty people said earlier. We do not know if there is any direct connection. "It's unprecedented."

Sein Win, executive editor of Mizzima News, said that the military council and pro-military armed groups, both pro-military and pro-military groups, have been targeting the media and journalists who report badly on the junta, and that the cycle will continue as long as the times are bad.

"People who value the freedom of the press, who criticize the military, who seek the truth, who do not want it, do not want it. Prisoners will be arrested, some will be found alive. The main reason is that a military coup is as long as democracy remains.

One observer of the media's Freedom of the Press warns that journalists in Burma lack legal protection and are losing out.

"Right now, in a nutshell, the freedom of the media is not protected by international standards or the law. Some are threatened, some are arrested, some are still dead. More and more are coming down.

So far, more than 50 journalists have been arrested, not under the Media Law, but under the Penal Code.

Myanmar Now, which regularly reports on democracy and human rights abuses; DVB New age 7 Days Mizzima Myitkyina Journal The 74 Media; Tachileik News Agency Delta News Agency; Zeyar Times News Agency and Kamaryut Media were suspended their business licenses shortly after the military coup in 2021.

According to the Reporters Without Borders (RSF) index, Burma's press freedom ranks 140 out of 180 countries since the military coup on February 1, 2021, and is at a worrying red level for the media.

Malaysian PM says he has contacts with NUG government

Malaysian Foreign Minister Saifuddin Abdullah says the Malaysian government has been in contact with the elected National Unity Government (NUG) after the military coup. This is the first time an Asean leader has made such a statement.

The report was first reported by BenarNews, and Malaysian Foreign Minister Saifuddin said in response to an open letter from the ASEAN Parliamentary Group on Human Rights (APHR) that no action had been taken on Asean's five-point peace process. He also urged the NUG to engage with the government.

The APHR letter also called on ASEAN to hold formal talks with the NUG government elected by the people of Burma as soon as possible. Malaysian Foreign Minister Saifuddin said on his Twitter account that he had met informally with the chairman of the NUGC National Unity Advisory Council (NUCC).

At the NUCC, representatives of the NUG National Unity Government; Civil society organizations; Tribal armed groups are involved. For the first time, a senior official acknowledged that there had been secret contacts between some Asean members and the NUG, as well as the Malaysian foreign minister's Twitter account.

Similarly, the implementation of the ASEAN Five-Point Agreement has been slow for about a year, and some Southeast Asian governments have begun to engage more directly and directly with the NUG.
 
Last week, on the one-year anniversary of the five-point ASEAN Agreement, human rights activists in the region and Burma called for an inclusive dialogue aimed at ending violence in Burma. At present, the political outcome is small. That is why some have called for an inclusive dialogue to mark the anniversary of the ASEAN Accords to end the violence in Burma.
 
The problem, however, is that if Asean enters into the talks with sincerity and optimism, it will not benefit the coup d'état of Burma and its power will be weakened. According to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP), at least 1,798 people have been killed in areas of military conflict across the country.
 
An open letter from the ASEAN Parliamentary Group on Human Rights (APHR) states that ASEAN should put more pressure on the Burmese military after a year of inaction by the military council. This year, military leader Min Aung Hlaing failed to implement any of the five-point ASEAN agreement. In addition, he committed crimes against the people of Burma. He said it was time for Asean to impose sanctions on him for failing to address the region.
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