How many people have vaccines saved from death?

The world celebrates World Immunization Week 2022, from April 24 to 30, and aims to shed light on the collective work needed to enhance the use of vaccines in order to protect individuals of all ages from diseases, according to the World Health Organization website.

Vaccines have saved millions of deaths
Selim Bodour, a Turkish scientist specializing in virology and immunology, said that thanks to vaccines, the lives of 20 million people who contracted fatal diseases were saved, between 2000 and 2021.

The Turkish doctor added - in an interview with Anatolia - that vaccines also contributed during the mentioned period, preventing 500 million diseases and 9 million permanent disabilities.

He stressed that these data confirm the importance of vaccinations for the health of society.

He explained that meningitis is one of the most preventable diseases that can be prevented through vaccinations.

He stated that vaccines contribute to saving the lives of about 5 million patients from death annually.


How many people have vaccines saved from death?  The world celebrates World Immunization Week 2022, from April 24 to 30, and aims to shed light on the collective work needed to enhance the use of vaccines in order to protect individuals of all ages from diseases, according to the World Health Organization website.  Vaccines have saved millions of deaths Selim Bodour, a Turkish scientist specializing in virology and immunology, said that thanks to vaccines, the lives of 20 million people who contracted fatal diseases were saved, between 2000 and 2021.  The Turkish doctor added - in an interview with Anatolia - that vaccines also contributed during the mentioned period, preventing 500 million diseases and 9 million permanent disabilities.  He stressed that these data confirm the importance of vaccinations for the health of society.  He explained that meningitis is one of the most preventable diseases that can be prevented through vaccinations.  He stated that vaccines contribute to saving the lives of about 5 million patients from death annually.  For its part, says the World Health Organization, "We now have vaccines to prevent more than 20 life-threatening diseases, helping people of all ages live longer and healthier lives. Immunization currently prevents between 2 and 3 million deaths each year from diseases such as Diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza and measles.  What vaccination? Vaccination is a simple, safe and effective way to protect people from harmful diseases before exposure to them. Vaccination uses your body's natural defenses to build up resistance to specific diseases, as well as boosting your immune system, according to the World Health Organization.  Vaccines train your immune system to make antibodies, just as it does when exposed to a disease. However, because vaccines contain only dead or weakened forms of germs such as viruses or bacteria, they do not cause disease and do not put you at risk of complications.  Most vaccines are given by injection, while others are given orally or sprayed into the nose.   How does the vaccine work? Vaccines reduce the risk of disease by building on your body's natural defenses to build the ability to protect it. When you receive the vaccine, there is a response from your immune system, as it:  Recognizes an invading germ, such as a virus or bacteria. It produces antibodies, which are proteins that the immune system naturally produces to fight disease. He remembers illness and how to fight it. If you're exposed to the germ in the future, your immune system will be able to destroy it quickly before you feel ill. Accordingly, the vaccine is a safe and smart way to generate an immune response in the body, without causing disease.  Our immune systems have the ability to remember. Once we are exposed to one or more doses of the vaccine, we are usually protected from disease for years, decades, or even life. This is what makes vaccines so effective, as they aim first to prevent disease before resorting to treatment after infection.   What diseases do vaccines prevent? Vaccines protect against many different diseases, including:  -Cholera -Diphtheria -Hepatitis B -Flu -Japanese encephalitis -Measles -Meningitis -Mumps -Pertussis -Pneumonia -Poliomyelitis -Rabies -Rotavirus -Rubella -Tetanus -Typhoid -Chickenpox (chickenpox) -Yellow fever -Cervical cancer Some other vaccines, including those that protect against Ebola or malaria, are currently being developed or trialled, but are not yet widely available globally.  Are vaccines safe? The World Health Organization stresses that "the vaccination is safe, and the side effects of the vaccine are usually mild and temporary, such as feeling arm pain or a slight fever. It can result in more serious side effects, but this case is very rare."  Before a vaccine is authorized for use, it undergoes rigorous testing, goes through several stages of trial, and is regularly re-evaluated once its use is started. Scientists also constantly monitor information received from several sources in search of any indication that the vaccine may pose a health risk.  Are there side effects of vaccines? Vaccines, like any medicine, can cause mild side effects such as low-grade fever, pain, or redness at the injection site. Mild reactions disappear spontaneously within a few days.   It is very rare for a vaccine to have severe or long-term side effects, as there is a one in a million chance of serious interactions.  Vaccines are subject to continuous monitoring to ensure their safety and to detect adverse events that are considered rare, according to the WHO.  Is there a link between vaccines and autism? The World Health Organization stresses that there is no evidence of an association between vaccines and autism, and this has been demonstrated in many studies conducted on very large numbers of the population.  But where did this fallacy come from that vaccination leads to autism? This fallacy dates back to 1998 when Dr. Andrew Wakefield published a study in the British medical journal "The Lancet", which included 12 children with autism, in which he claimed that the triple vaccine (MMR) given against measles, mumps and rubella may lead to autism.   After the study was published, several reviews were conducted, and the following was found:  The reviewers described the research as "sophisticated forgery". Several subsequent investigations were conducted, but none succeeded in substantiating Wakefield's claims. In 2010 the Lancet withdrew the study, and in the same year Wakefield's license to practice medicine in the UK was withdrawn . In the British Medical Council's decision to withdraw the license, the council said that Wakefield could have retracted the results of his research and admitted that there were problems, but he did not and acted in a dishonest and irresponsible manner. He also referred to an incident in which Wakefield paid £5 to children attending a birthday party in exchange for donating blood for a study he was conducting. Although Wakefield's claims have been proven false, this study is still used by anti-vaccine opponents to support their claims, which are often presented with allegations of "conspiracy" by certain parties or pharmaceutical companies that manufacture vaccines and do not want people to know the truth to preserve their profits, for example. The Global Share organization stresses that "we must all be keen to take the necessary measures so that we only exchange reliable scientific information about vaccines and the diseases that prevent them."  Source : Al Jazeera + agencies + WHO + Anadolu Agency


For its part, says the World Health Organization, "We now have vaccines to prevent more than 20 life-threatening diseases, helping people of all ages live longer and healthier lives. Immunization currently prevents between 2 and 3 million deaths each year from diseases such as Diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza and measles.

What vaccination?
Vaccination is a simple, safe and effective way to protect people from harmful diseases before exposure to them. Vaccination uses your body's natural defenses to build up resistance to specific diseases, as well as boosting your immune system, according to the World Health Organization.

Vaccines train your immune system to make antibodies, just as it does when exposed to a disease. However, because vaccines contain only dead or weakened forms of germs such as viruses or bacteria, they do not cause disease and do not put you at risk of complications.

Most vaccines are given by injection, while others are given orally or sprayed into the nose.

How does the vaccine work?
Vaccines reduce the risk of disease by building on your body's natural defenses to build the ability to protect it. When you receive the vaccine, there is a response from your immune system, as it:

Recognizes an invading germ, such as a virus or bacteria.
It produces antibodies, which are proteins that the immune system naturally produces to fight disease.
He remembers illness and how to fight it. If you're exposed to the germ in the future, your immune system will be able to destroy it quickly before you feel ill.
Accordingly, the vaccine is a safe and smart way to generate an immune response in the body, without causing disease.

Our immune systems have the ability to remember. Once we are exposed to one or more doses of the vaccine, we are usually protected from disease for years, decades, or even life. This is what makes vaccines so effective, as they aim first to prevent disease before resorting to treatment after infection.

What diseases do vaccines prevent?
Vaccines protect against many different diseases, including:

-Cholera
-Diphtheria
-Hepatitis B
-Flu
-Japanese encephalitis
-Measles
-Meningitis
-Mumps
-Pertussis
-Pneumonia
-Poliomyelitis
-Rabies
-Rotavirus
-Rubella
-Tetanus
-Typhoid
-Chickenpox (chickenpox)
-Yellow fever
-Cervical cancer.

Some other vaccines, including those that protect against Ebola or malaria, are currently being developed or trialled, but are not yet widely available globally.

Are vaccines safe?
The World Health Organization stresses that "the vaccination is safe, and the side effects of the vaccine are usually mild and temporary, such as feeling arm pain or a slight fever. It can result in more serious side effects, but this case is very rare."

Before a vaccine is authorized for use, it undergoes rigorous testing, goes through several stages of trial, and is regularly re-evaluated once its use is started. Scientists also constantly monitor information received from several sources in search of any indication that the vaccine may pose a health risk.

Are there side effects of vaccines?
Vaccines, like any medicine, can cause mild side effects such as low-grade fever, pain, or redness at the injection site. Mild reactions disappear spontaneously within a few days.

It is very rare for a vaccine to have severe or long-term side effects, as there is a one in a million chance of serious interactions.

Vaccines are subject to continuous monitoring to ensure their safety and to detect adverse events that are considered rare, according to the WHO.

Is there a link between vaccines and autism?
The World Health Organization stresses that there is no evidence of an association between vaccines and autism, and this has been demonstrated in many studies conducted on very large numbers of the population.

But where did this fallacy come from that vaccination leads to autism?
This fallacy dates back to 1998 when Dr. Andrew Wakefield published a study in the British medical journal "The Lancet", which included 12 children with autism, in which he claimed that the triple vaccine (MMR) given against measles, mumps and rubella may lead to autism.

After the study was published, several reviews were conducted, and the following was found:

The reviewers described the research as "sophisticated forgery". Several subsequent investigations were conducted, but none succeeded in substantiating Wakefield's claims. In 2010 the Lancet withdrew the study, and in the same year Wakefield's license to practice medicine in the UK was withdrawn .
In the British Medical Council's decision to withdraw the license, the council said that Wakefield could have retracted the results of his research and admitted that there were problems, but he did not and acted in a dishonest and irresponsible manner.

He also referred to an incident in which Wakefield paid £5 to children attending a birthday party in exchange for donating blood for a study he was conducting.

Although Wakefield's claims have been proven false, this study is still used by anti-vaccine opponents to support their claims, which are often presented with allegations of "conspiracy" by certain parties or pharmaceutical companies that manufacture vaccines and do not want people to know the truth to preserve their profits, for example.

The Global Share organization stresses that "we must all be keen to take the necessary measures so that we only exchange reliable scientific information about vaccines and the diseases that prevent them."

Source : WHO + Anadolu Agency
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