Germany files a case against Italy in the International Court of Justice in a case dating back to World War II

The International Court of Justice confirmed that Germany had brought it against Italy, accusing Rome of not respecting Germany's immunity from jurisdiction as a sovereign state.

Germany indicated in this case, according to a statement issued by the International Court of Justice yesterday, Friday, that Italy does not comply with the decision issued by the Court on February 3, 2012, which recognized that Italy had failed to fulfill its duties by allowing the filing of lawsuits aimed at obliging Berlin to pay compensation to victims of crimes Nazism.


Germany stressed in its new lawsuit that the Italian courts have since filed, in violation of the International Court's decision, a large number of new cases against Germany, "in violation of its judicial immunity."
Germany files a case against Italy in the International Court of Justice in a case dating back to World War II  The International Court of Justice confirmed that Germany had brought it against Italy, accusing Rome of not respecting Germany's immunity from jurisdiction as a sovereign state.  Germany indicated in this case, according to a statement issued by the International Court of Justice yesterday, Friday, that Italy does not comply with the decision issued by the Court on February 3, 2012, which recognized that Italy had failed to fulfill its duties by allowing the filing of lawsuits aimed at obliging Berlin to pay compensation to victims of crimes Nazism.   Germany stressed in its new lawsuit that the Italian courts have since filed, in violation of the International Court's decision, a large number of new cases against Germany, "in violation of its judicial immunity."  The German side stated that there are at least 25 new lawsuits that were decided in at least 15 of them by Italian courts against Germany in cases related to the behavior of the Nazi Reich during the Second World War.   The German lawsuit states that Resolution No. 238 of 2014 issued by the Italian Constitutional Court constitutes a "willful violation of international law" and a violation of Italy's duties to comply with the ruling issued by the International Court of Justice, the highest judicial body in the United Nations, stressing that this decision "brought wide negative repercussions." the range".  Berlin asked the International Court of Justice to acknowledge that Italy had violated its obligations to respect Germany's immunity from jurisdiction, in particular by confiscating or threatening to confiscate German government properties on the territory of Italy, including the Archeology Museum, the Goethe Institute, the German Institute of History and the German School in Rome.  Germany demanded the court to oblige Italy to annul the rulings in the aforementioned cases and to take effective measures to ensure that Italian courts do not consider cases against Germany regarding violations of international humanitarian law committed by the Nazi German authorities during the period between 1943 and 1945, and to provide guarantees to Berlin that this “Violations of its sovereign immunity will not be repeated,” as well as compensation for any financially assessable losses as a result of those trials in Italy.  In December 2007, Germany resorted to the International Court of Justice after facing for years a number of cases before Italian courts that families of victims of Nazi crimes resorted to, and Berlin insists that the issue of compensation was settled within the framework of agreements concluded between countries after World War II.  Source: RT + "AFP"


The German side stated that there are at least 25 new lawsuits that were decided in at least 15 of them by Italian courts against Germany in cases related to the behavior of the Nazi Reich during the Second World War. 

The German lawsuit states that Resolution No. 238 of 2014 issued by the Italian Constitutional Court constitutes a "willful violation of international law" and a violation of Italy's duties to comply with the ruling issued by the International Court of Justice, the highest judicial body in the United Nations, stressing that this decision "brought wide negative repercussions." the range".

Berlin asked the International Court of Justice to acknowledge that Italy had violated its obligations to respect Germany's immunity from jurisdiction, in particular by confiscating or threatening to confiscate German government properties on the territory of Italy, including the Archeology Museum, the Goethe Institute, the German Institute of History and the German School in Rome.

Germany demanded the court to oblige Italy to annul the rulings in the aforementioned cases and to take effective measures to ensure that Italian courts do not consider cases against Germany regarding violations of international humanitarian law committed by the Nazi German authorities during the period between 1943 and 1945, and to provide guarantees to Berlin that this “Violations of its sovereign immunity will not be repeated,” as well as compensation for any financially assessable losses as a result of those trials in Italy.

In December 2007, Germany resorted to the International Court of Justice after facing for years a number of cases before Italian courts that families of victims of Nazi crimes resorted to, and Berlin insists that the issue of compensation was settled within the framework of agreements concluded between countries after World War II.

Source: RT + "AFP"
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