The disputants in Yemen agree on a plan regarding the oil tanker "Safer" What is its story?

The disputants in Yemen agree on a plan regarding the oil tanker "Safer" What is its story? The United Nations announced the approval of the parties to the Yemeni conflict on a plan aimed at addressing the dangers of the oil tanker "Safer", anchored off the coast of the Yemeni city of Hodeidah. The plan includes the installation of a long-term replacement vessel for the tanker over a target period of 18 months.  The United Nations announced the approval of the parties to the conflict in Yemen on a plan aimed at addressing the dangers of the oil tanker "Safer", anchored off the coast of the city of Hodeidah, in the west of the country.  This came in a press conference, on Friday, held by the UN Resident Coordinator for Humanitarian Affairs, David Grisley, with journalists at the United Nations Headquarters in New York.  "Safer" is a floating storage and unloading unit, anchored off the western coast of Yemen, 60 km north of the port of Hodeidah (under the control of the Houthis), and is used to store and export oil coming from the fields of Ma'rib Governorate.  Because it has not undergone maintenance work since 2015, the crude oil (1.148 million barrels) and the rising gases pose a serious threat to the region, and the United Nations says that the ship is a "ticking bomb that could explode at any moment."  "We have a coordinated plan to address the imminent threat of a major oil spill from the tanker," Gresley said.  He pointed out that his team had worked hard with the parties during the past six months "to defuse what was rightly called a time bomb off the coast of the Yemeni Red Sea."  The UN official emphasized that "the plan has won the support of the conflict parties and other key stakeholders, as well as the UN Security Council."  The plan, according to Gresley, includes "the installation of a long-term replacement vessel for the tanker within a target period of 18 months."  He added, "Then a 4-month emergency operation will be carried out by a global rescue company with the aim of eliminating the immediate threat, and transferring the oil to a safe temporary vessel."  "The tanker is beyond repair, and a major spill could destroy fishing communities on the Yemeni Red Sea coast," Gresley explained.  He continued, "The environmental impact will also be severe, and the cleaning costs alone are estimated at 20 billion US dollars, and this does not count the cost of environmental damage across the Red Sea, or the billions that could be lost due to the disruption of shipping through the Bab al-Mandab Strait."  The UN official revealed that he will travel next week to several capitals in the Arab Gulf region to "discuss the plan and request support."  He noted that "the Netherlands, which is a primary stakeholder in supporting the efforts of the United Nations, will organize an event to announce donations in the coming weeks."

The United Nations announced the approval of the parties to the Yemeni conflict on a plan aimed at addressing the dangers of the oil tanker "Safer", anchored off the coast of the Yemeni city of Hodeidah. The plan includes the installation of a long-term replacement vessel for the tanker over a target period of 18 months.

The United Nations announced the approval of the parties to the conflict in Yemen on a plan aimed at addressing the dangers of the oil tanker "Safer", anchored off the coast of the city of Hodeidah, in the west of the country.

This came in a press conference, on Friday, held by the UN Resident Coordinator for Humanitarian Affairs, David Grisley, with journalists at the United Nations Headquarters in New York.

"Safer" is a floating storage and unloading unit, anchored off the western coast of Yemen, 60 km north of the port of Hodeidah (under the control of the Houthis), and is used to store and export oil coming from the fields of Ma'rib Governorate.

Because it has not undergone maintenance work since 2015, the crude oil (1.148 million barrels) and the rising gases pose a serious threat to the region, and the United Nations says that the ship is a "ticking bomb that could explode at any moment."

"We have a coordinated plan to address the imminent threat of a major oil spill from the tanker," Gresley said.

He pointed out that his team had worked hard with the parties during the past six months "to defuse what was rightly called a time bomb off the coast of the Yemeni Red Sea."

The UN official emphasized that "the plan has won the support of the conflict parties and other key stakeholders, as well as the UN Security Council."

The plan, according to Gresley, includes "the installation of a long-term replacement vessel for the tanker within a target period of 18 months."

He added, "Then a 4-month emergency operation will be carried out by a global rescue company with the aim of eliminating the immediate threat, and transferring the oil to a safe temporary vessel."

"The tanker is beyond repair, and a major spill could destroy fishing communities on the Yemeni Red Sea coast," Gresley explained.

He continued, "The environmental impact will also be severe, and the cleaning costs alone are estimated at 20 billion US dollars, and this does not count the cost of environmental damage across the Red Sea, or the billions that could be lost due to the disruption of shipping through the Bab al-Mandab Strait."

The UN official revealed that he will travel next week to several capitals in the Arab Gulf region to "discuss the plan and request support."

He noted that "the Netherlands, which is a primary stakeholder in supporting the efforts of the United Nations, will organize an event to announce donations in the coming weeks."
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