A clash between the police and young Muslims during the Eid prayer in Addis Ababa What is the reason?

Clashes took place for a short period in the center of the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, between young Ethiopian Muslims and the police, who used tear gas during Eid al-Fitr prayers. What's the reason?

On Monday, clashes erupted briefly in the center of Addis Ababa between young Ethiopian Muslims and police who used tear gas during Eid al-Fitr prayers.

The circumstances that led to the outbreak of the confrontations are not yet clear. But a Muslim official said that a policeman mistakenly fired a tear gas grenade at Muslims who had gathered for prayer in the center of the Ethiopian capital.

The Supreme Council of Islamic Affairs in Addis Ababa indicated in a statement that the incidents "that occurred during the Eid prayer are not related to a problem between Christians and Muslims...and are not from the work of the government, as some are trying to promote."

For its part, the Addis Ababa police said in a brief statement: "A riot carried out by a small number of individuals during the Eid prayer caused material damage," confirming the return of calm. She added that she "will announce later the cause of the riots."

The confrontations began near the capital's international stadium, where prayers were organized. When the stadium was full, those who could not enter it prayed outside, especially in the large Meskel Square.

An official at the Supreme Council of Islamic Affairs in Addis Ababa, who asked not to be named, said, "We do not have clear information about the cause of the clashes," according to what was reported by Agence France-Presse.
A clash between the police and young Muslims during the Eid prayer in Addis Ababa What is the reason? Clashes took place for a short period in the center of the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, between young Ethiopian Muslims and the police, who used tear gas during Eid al-Fitr prayers. What's the reason?  On Monday, clashes erupted briefly in the center of Addis Ababa between young Ethiopian Muslims and police who used tear gas during Eid al-Fitr prayers.  The circumstances that led to the outbreak of the confrontations are not yet clear. But a Muslim official said that a policeman mistakenly fired a tear gas grenade at Muslims who had gathered for prayer in the center of the Ethiopian capital.  The Supreme Council of Islamic Affairs in Addis Ababa indicated in a statement that the incidents "that occurred during the Eid prayer are not related to a problem between Christians and Muslims...and are not from the work of the government, as some are trying to promote."  For its part, the Addis Ababa police said in a brief statement: "A riot carried out by a small number of individuals during the Eid prayer caused material damage," confirming the return of calm. She added that she "will announce later the cause of the riots."  The confrontations began near the capital's international stadium, where prayers were organized. When the stadium was full, those who could not enter it prayed outside, especially in the large Meskel Square.  An official at the Supreme Council of Islamic Affairs in Addis Ababa, who asked not to be named, said, "We do not have clear information about the cause of the clashes," according to what was reported by Agence France-Presse.  "It appears that a policeman unintentionally fired a tear gas canister at a crowd of worshipers gathered for prayer in Meskel Square," the official added, citing volunteers who organized the prayer.  He added that the policeman's colleagues removed him from the scene, but "people were shocked and shouted and the situation got out of control."  In its statement, his organization considered that the deployment of police reinforcements after the incident had exacerbated the tension.  Youths were seen throwing stones at police near Meskel Square. Some chanted: "Justice for Gondar" and "Do not burn our mosques, do not kill our children."  Gondar is located in the Amhara region of northwestern Ethiopia, where, according to Muslim officials, at least 20 people were killed in late April in anti-Muslim violence attributed to "Christian extremists".  In a statement, the Ethiopian government accused what it called "the historical enemies of Ethiopia", without specifying them, of "trying to implement their diabolical plan during the Eid prayer" without mentioning the cause or course of the violence.  "Their desire for chaos was thwarted by the peaceful (Muslim) worshipers," she added, noting that there had been "minor damage" and injuries to the police.  A member of the Islamic Affairs Council said: "This is the first time that we witness events during the collective Eid prayers organized in the capital since the fall of the Marxist military regime in 1991."  He explained that "Muslims are organized and peaceful" want "to spend Eid in peace."  Ethiopia is a country with a majority of the population professing Christianity, and the proportion of Muslims in it is about 30%.


"It appears that a policeman unintentionally fired a tear gas canister at a crowd of worshipers gathered for prayer in Meskel Square," the official added, citing volunteers who organized the prayer.

He added that the policeman's colleagues removed him from the scene, but "people were shocked and shouted and the situation got out of control."

In its statement, his organization considered that the deployment of police reinforcements after the incident had exacerbated the tension.

Youths were seen throwing stones at police near Meskel Square. Some chanted: "Justice for Gondar" and "Do not burn our mosques, do not kill our children."

Gondar is located in the Amhara region of northwestern Ethiopia, where, according to Muslim officials, at least 20 people were killed in late April in anti-Muslim violence attributed to "Christian extremists".

In a statement, the Ethiopian government accused what it called "the historical enemies of Ethiopia", without specifying them, of "trying to implement their diabolical plan during the Eid prayer" without mentioning the cause or course of the violence.

"Their desire for chaos was thwarted by the peaceful (Muslim) worshipers," she added, noting that there had been "minor damage" and injuries to the police.

A member of the Islamic Affairs Council said: "This is the first time that we witness events during the collective Eid prayers organized in the capital since the fall of the Marxist military regime in 1991."

He explained that "Muslims are organized and peaceful" want "to spend Eid in peace."

Ethiopia is a country with a majority of the population professing Christianity, and the proportion of Muslims in it is about 30%.

After "sovereign efforts" the release of 20 Egyptian sailors who were detained in Yemen 

The Egyptian authorities announced that their "sovereign bodies" had succeeded in releasing 20 Egyptian sailors who were detained in Yemen.

On Monday, the Egyptian authorities announced that their "sovereign bodies" had succeeded in releasing 20 Egyptian sailors who were detained in Yemen.

This came, according to what was reported by the official Egyptian News Agency (Asha).

And the agency stated, "The sovereign authorities succeeded in releasing 20 Egyptian sailors in Yemen, and their return to the country is being secured," without specifying a date.

The efforts to release the sailors came from the presidential directives of the agencies concerned with providing all aspects of care to Egyptians at home and abroad, and it was found that all the sailors are fine and have received the necessary care.

The Egyptian Agency did not give more details about the timing or reason for the detention of these sailors, or the party that detained them.

However, other sources said earlier that a number of Egyptian sailors were arrested in Yemen, after they were accused of crossing Yemeni territorial waters without a permit.

At that time, a state of sadness prevailed among the families of the Egyptian fishermen detained in Yemen, after they received news of their imprisonment for 6 months, the confiscation of the boat and its contents, in addition to a fine of $25,000.
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