American researchers create a battery for electronic devices from bacteria and sweat American researchers create a battery for electronic devices from bacteria and sweat

American researchers create a battery for electronic devices from bacteria and sweat

American researchers create a battery for electronic devices from bacteria and sweat  Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst recently announced that they were able to design a microbial biofilm that has the ability to produce long-term electricity derived from human sweat, to power wearable electronics on the body. Or sometimes implanted in it, and it includes all personal electronics and medical sensors.  According to the study , whose results were published in the journal Nature Communications, this microbial biofilm depends in its generation of electricity on the evaporation of sweat from the moisture on human skin, and researchers expect this new and exciting technology to create a real green revolution in the world wearable electronics.  very exciting technology “This is a very exciting technology,” says Xiaoming Liu, a graduate student in electrical and computer engineering at the university and co-lead author on the research paper, according to a University of Massachusetts Amherst press release dated August 2. Unlike other so-called "green energy" sources, because their production is completely green.   The biofilm is a thin layer of bacterial cells roughly a sheet of paper thick (Xiaoming Liu - University of Massachusetts Amherst) This innovative biofilm is a thin layer of bacterial cells about the thickness of a sheet, which is naturally produced by an engineered version of Geobacter sulfurreducens, a type of anaerobic bacteria that comes from the family of bacteria called Geobacteraceae. (Geobacteraceae).  The university’s statement adds that the use of “Geobacter sylvoridiocens” bacteria in the production of electricity was previously used in “microbial batteries”, and they were used to power electrical devices, but such batteries require properly caring for these bacteria and feeding them a steady diet, unlike the technology of Biofilm detected.  And according to the summary of the study published in the journal Nature Communications: Bacteria of the genus "Geobacter" look like tiny beans from which grow long wire-like tails, and it turns out that these nanowires actually conduct electricity, and scientists have been studying these bacteria conduct electricity for decades, hoping to develop a living technology that can operate safely inside the human body, resist corrosion, or even generate electricity from scratch.  On the biofilm industry and powering personal electronic devices, Professor Jun Yao, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and the other lead author of the paper, says what makes the membrane work is that Geobacter sylvoridiocins grow in colonies that resemble thin mats, and each type of individual microbe communicates with its neighbors. Through a series of natural nanowires.  The team harvests these mats and uses a laser to etch small circles into the membranes. Once those membranes are etched, they are placed between the electrodes and finally sealed in a soft, sticky, breathable polymer that you can apply directly to your skin. It can operate small appliances.  Features of the new membrane As stated in the press release, what distinguishes the new biofilm is its ability to provide a large amount of energy, if not more than a battery of similar size, and without the need to feed these bacteria, unlike what is in other microbial batteries, in addition to that. Its ability to make energy from the moisture present on human skin.  As the statement explains, at least 50% of the solar energy that reaches the Earth is directed towards evaporating water. On the role of this feature in the production of energy from human sweat, Jun Yao says, "This is a huge and untapped source of energy, since the surface of the skin is constantly wet with sweat, so the biofilm can conduct and convert the energy reserved in evaporation into enough energy to operate small devices."  "The limiting factor for wearable electronics has been the presence of a permanent source of power, as the batteries of these devices usually run out and must be changed or charged, in addition to that, they are bulky, heavy and uncomfortable, so the thin, transparent, small and flexible biofilms that produce a supply of Continuous and constant electricity, which is worn like a first aid pad, like a patch placed directly on the skin solves all these problems.”

Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst recently announced that they were able to design a microbial biofilm that has the ability to produce long-term electricity derived from human sweat, to power wearable electronics on the body. Or sometimes implanted in it, and it includes all personal electronics and medical sensors.

According to the study , whose results were published in the journal Nature Communications, this microbial biofilm depends in its generation of electricity on the evaporation of sweat from the moisture on human skin, and researchers expect this new and exciting technology to create a real green revolution in the world wearable electronics.

very exciting technology
“This is a very exciting technology,” says Xiaoming Liu, a graduate student in electrical and computer engineering at the university and co-lead author on the research paper, according to a University of Massachusetts Amherst press release dated August 2. Unlike other so-called "green energy" sources, because their production is completely green.

This innovative biofilm is a thin layer of bacterial cells about the thickness of a sheet, which is naturally produced by an engineered version of Geobacter sulfurreducens, a type of anaerobic bacteria that comes from the family of bacteria called Geobacteraceae. (Geobacteraceae).

The university’s statement adds that the use of “Geobacter sylvoridiocens” bacteria in the production of electricity was previously used in “microbial batteries”, and they were used to power electrical devices, but such batteries require properly caring for these bacteria and feeding them a steady diet, unlike the technology of Biofilm detected.

And according to the summary of the study published in the journal Nature Communications: Bacteria of the genus "Geobacter" look like tiny beans from which grow long wire-like tails, and it turns out that these nanowires actually conduct electricity, and scientists have been studying these bacteria conduct electricity for decades, hoping to develop a living technology that can operate safely inside the human body, resist corrosion, or even generate electricity from scratch.

On the biofilm industry and powering personal electronic devices, Professor Jun Yao, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and the other lead author of the paper, says what makes the membrane work is that Geobacter sylvoridiocins grow in colonies that resemble thin mats, and each type of individual microbe communicates with its neighbors. Through a series of natural nanowires.

The team harvests these mats and uses a laser to etch small circles into the membranes. Once those membranes are etched, they are placed between the electrodes and finally sealed in a soft, sticky, breathable polymer that you can apply directly to your skin. It can operate small appliances.

Features of the new membrane
As stated in the press release, what distinguishes the new biofilm is its ability to provide a large amount of energy, if not more than a battery of similar size, and without the need to feed these bacteria, unlike what is in other microbial batteries, in addition to that. Its ability to make energy from the moisture present on human skin.

As the statement explains, at least 50% of the solar energy that reaches the Earth is directed towards evaporating water. On the role of this feature in the production of energy from human sweat, Jun Yao says, "This is a huge and untapped source of energy, since the surface of the skin is constantly wet with sweat, so the biofilm can conduct and convert the energy reserved in evaporation into enough energy to operate small devices."

"The limiting factor for wearable electronics has been the presence of a permanent source of power, as the batteries of these devices usually run out and must be changed or charged, in addition to that, they are bulky, heavy and uncomfortable, so the thin, transparent, small and flexible biofilms that produce a supply of Continuous and constant electricity, which is worn like a first aid pad, like a patch placed directly on the skin solves all these problems.”
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