"Anti-immigrant" Who is Georgia Meloni, the most likely candidate to lead Italy?

"Anti-immigrant" Who is Georgia Meloni, the most likely candidate to lead Italy? Far-right Georgia Meloni is close to winning the Italian premiership in Sunday's elections, as the first woman to reach this position in the country's history. Meloni's attitudes and rhetoric have long stirred controversy in the country.  Giorgia Meloni, leader of the far-right Brothers of Italy party, recently topped all opinion polls for the elections scheduled for tomorrow, Sunday, September 25, to be the most likely candidate to become the first woman to reach the position of prime minister in Italy.  Meloni, 45, is a seasoned and outspoken politician with the ability to communicate and exchange ideas, and in the event of her expected victory, she will head the most right-wing majority government since World War II.  Despite being known for her tough talk and strong tenacity in her political battles, Meloni's recent ascent as the frontrunner after the September 25 elections raises questions about her future as a leader.  Meloni was born in the working-class Garbatella district of Rome, and began her political career when she was 15.  She helped found the Brothers of Italy party in 2012, after 4 years of assuming a ministerial position, when she became the youngest minister in the government led by Silvio Berlusconi at the time.  Her party worked to reduce the electoral support of its traditional allies, Berlusconi's Forza Italia and Matteo Salvini's League, raising its tally from 4% of the vote in the 2018 elections to about 25% in the latest polls for the elections, Sunday 25 September. .  During the years of her leadership of the Brothers of Italy party, Meloni managed to transform her party from a party that espouses neo-fascist policies and views, which arose from the ruins of the Mussolini era, into a nationalist and populist political force capable of attracting right-wing and moderate voters.  “I am Georgia, I am a woman, a mother and a Christian” was one of Meloni's most popular phrases, which went viral on social media and even been turned into a rap song.  Wolfango Piccoli, head of London-based research firm Teneo, said: "While I rule out her government having a fascist tone, it is doubtful whether Meloni will stick to the centrist path she followed during the election campaign."  Piccoli added that Meloni, who was originally a fierce critic of the European Union's fiscal policies, is not expected to clash with Brussels in the short term, but it remains to be seen whether her previous skeptical position on the European Union can return.  Analysts emphasized that Meloni, during her election campaign, was addressing two different audiences, the first being international allies, as she tried to reassure them by affirming her support for the defense of Ukraine and the integrity of her pro-NATO approach.  The second is the domestic public and its traditional constituency, for whom it has insisted on anti-immigrant and anti-LGBT (LGBT) policies.  Identity Policies  Many observers believe that Meloni will face the unpopularity that previous opposition leaders have always suffered once they take office.  Moreover, Meloni inherited from her predecessor a very difficult agenda, including the energy crisis, record inflation, and a looming recession.  It will also have to accommodate its two weary allies, Berlusconi and Salvini, who feel weakened by her popularity.  Massimiliano Panaari, a political analyst at Mercatorum University in Rome, told Anadolu Agency: "Meloni is still a mystery that is difficult to understand. It is very difficult to predict whether she will end up becoming the leader of a ruling party or a revolutionary political force."  Meloni's ideology strongly embraces identity politics and focuses on defending national borders, national interests, and the so-called "traditional family." Meloni has long been a staunch opponent of drugs and abortion, though she has emphasized that she would not ban abortion in the country if she came to power.  Meloni's international approach is not entirely clear, and comes after a stable 19-month term under the leadership of former European Central Bank President Mario Draghi, whose government collapsed last July.  Franco Pavoncello, professor of political science and president of John Cabot University, in Rome, said, "It will be crucial to see how worried international allies are about the new Italian government and how the markets will react."  Meloni will have to take firm positions on EU policies to counter the Russian war in Ukraine, current and future European economic policies, and the resilience of Italian democracy.  The right-wing bloc led by Meloni's party is likely to achieve a comfortable majority in the House and Senate in Sunday's elections.  Opinion polls indicate that the Brothers of Italy and its allies must secure between 44% and 47% of the vote, to lead the center-left coalition.  Analysts ruled out a landslide victory for the right-wing bloc by obtaining a two-thirds majority in parliament, which is the percentage needed to change the constitution without referring to the voters by organizing a referendum.  With the proportion of voters undecided about their candidate still being large at around 25%, there is still a possibility that the right-wing coalition will secure a smaller majority than previously indicated by polls.

Far-right Georgia Meloni is close to winning the Italian premiership in Sunday's elections, as the first woman to reach this position in the country's history. Meloni's attitudes and rhetoric have long stirred controversy in the country.

Giorgia Meloni, leader of the far-right Brothers of Italy party, recently topped all opinion polls for the elections scheduled for tomorrow, Sunday, September 25, to be the most likely candidate to become the first woman to reach the position of prime minister in Italy.

Meloni, 45, is a seasoned and outspoken politician with the ability to communicate and exchange ideas, and in the event of her expected victory, she will head the most right-wing majority government since World War II.

Despite being known for her tough talk and strong tenacity in her political battles, Meloni's recent ascent as the frontrunner after the September 25 elections raises questions about her future as a leader.

Meloni was born in the working-class Garbatella district of Rome, and began her political career when she was 15.

She helped found the Brothers of Italy party in 2012, after 4 years of assuming a ministerial position, when she became the youngest minister in the government led by Silvio Berlusconi at the time.

Her party worked to reduce the electoral support of its traditional allies, Berlusconi's Forza Italia and Matteo Salvini's League, raising its tally from 4% of the vote in the 2018 elections to about 25% in the latest polls for the elections, Sunday 25 September. .

During the years of her leadership of the Brothers of Italy party, Meloni managed to transform her party from a party that espouses neo-fascist policies and views, which arose from the ruins of the Mussolini era, into a nationalist and populist political force capable of attracting right-wing and moderate voters.

“I am Georgia, I am a woman, a mother and a Christian” was one of Meloni's most popular phrases, which went viral on social media and even been turned into a rap song.

Wolfango Piccoli, head of London-based research firm Teneo, said: "While I rule out her government having a fascist tone, it is doubtful whether Meloni will stick to the centrist path she followed during the election campaign."

Piccoli added that Meloni, who was originally a fierce critic of the European Union's fiscal policies, is not expected to clash with Brussels in the short term, but it remains to be seen whether her previous skeptical position on the European Union can return.

Analysts emphasized that Meloni, during her election campaign, was addressing two different audiences, the first being international allies, as she tried to reassure them by affirming her support for the defense of Ukraine and the integrity of her pro-NATO approach.

The second is the domestic public and its traditional constituency, for whom it has insisted on anti-immigrant and anti-LGBT (LGBT) policies.

Identity Policies

Many observers believe that Meloni will face the unpopularity that previous opposition leaders have always suffered once they take office.

Moreover, Meloni inherited from her predecessor a very difficult agenda, including the energy crisis, record inflation, and a looming recession.

It will also have to accommodate its two weary allies, Berlusconi and Salvini, who feel weakened by her popularity.

Massimiliano Panaari, a political analyst at Mercatorum University in Rome, told Anadolu Agency: "Meloni is still a mystery that is difficult to understand. It is very difficult to predict whether she will end up becoming the leader of a ruling party or a revolutionary political force."

Meloni's ideology strongly embraces identity politics and focuses on defending national borders, national interests, and the so-called "traditional family." Meloni has long been a staunch opponent of drugs and abortion, though she has emphasized that she would not ban abortion in the country if she came to power.

Meloni's international approach is not entirely clear, and comes after a stable 19-month term under the leadership of former European Central Bank President Mario Draghi, whose government collapsed last July.

Franco Pavoncello, professor of political science and president of John Cabot University, in Rome, said, "It will be crucial to see how worried international allies are about the new Italian government and how the markets will react."

Meloni will have to take firm positions on EU policies to counter the Russian war in Ukraine, current and future European economic policies, and the resilience of Italian democracy.

The right-wing bloc led by Meloni's party is likely to achieve a comfortable majority in the House and Senate in Sunday's elections.

Opinion polls indicate that the Brothers of Italy and its allies must secure between 44% and 47% of the vote, to lead the center-left coalition.

Analysts ruled out a landslide victory for the right-wing bloc by obtaining a two-thirds majority in parliament, which is the percentage needed to change the constitution without referring to the voters by organizing a referendum.

With the proportion of voters undecided about their candidate still being large at around 25%, there is still a possibility that the right-wing coalition will secure a smaller majority than previously indicated by polls.
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