Attempts to connect the earth with the sky Is it possible to predict earthquakes from the shape of clouds? : Ronald Carell

Attempts to connect the earth with the sky Is it possible to predict earthquakes from the shape of clouds? : Ronald Carell Although it is not possible to predict where it will occur and how severe it will strike, there are many studies of earthquakes. One such study is the relationship between earthquakes and clouds devised by the Turkish-French researcher Ronald Carrell and promoted for more than half a century.  Professor Ronald Carrel, who holds Turkish and French citizenship, has worked to understand the relationship between earthquakes and clouds since he discovered some different cloud formations before the earthquake in the 1970s.  When Carrel was a child in the 1970s, he noticed that some clouds had begun to form before the earthquake and began to research the earthquake's relationship to clouds. He drew attention to his ability to predict some earthquakes and tried to transfer this research to scientific platforms and communities, until in 2014 he succeeded in becoming a senior director at the Geo Cosmo Research Center based in San Francisco, which will have branches in Asia, Europe and America.  Turkish researcher Karel, who spends half the year working in England and the other half in Bodrum, Turkey, continues to forecast earthquakes at the Geo Cosmo Center he has headed in England since 2016, by following ionized cloud formations.  Ronald Carrell , a Frenchman with Turkish citizenship, fell in love with clouds at a young age. Because of this passion, he was expelled from his school because he was not interested in the lessons because he was too busy to follow the drawings. It was in those years that he was expelled from school that he discovered the first seismic clouds. Carel traded his childhood love and youth for the relationship of earthquake and atmosphere, as he devoted most of his life to researching the clouds.  He had a long-standing interest in meteorology, particularly in clouds and unusual cloud formations. When he was 16, on the afternoon of March 28, 1970, he noticed strange "unair clouds" over Istanbul. Over the next night, a 7.2-magnitude earthquake struck near Gediz. The same method, which looks for unusual cloud formations, has led to many earthquake predictions.  After more than 3 decades of continuous rejection of Carrell's theory by universities and scientific communities, but with the 2006 establishment of the Meteoquake Research Center in London, which was joined by many scientists from all over the world, many research groups around the world began to express their interest Carrell's theory, especially after NASA's Dr. Friedman Freund provided evidence that massive ionization of air at the Earth-atmosphere interface may be related to the build-up of tectonic pressures in the Earth's crust before a major earthquake, and thus provided a physical explanation for the first time to support his long-held view Ronald Carell.  ionized clouds  Earthquakes occur in the upper crust of the Earth. Line fractures called "fault lines" can lead to extensive physical damage and loss of life. Geo Cosmo researchers said that although earthquakes cannot be predicted in advance, robust predictions can be made by monitoring clouds, according to a recent report published by TRT Haber .  Accordingly, positive electric current builds up under the rocks on the fault line prior to the earthquake. These currents rise to the surface at a speed of 200 meters per second and begin to form ionizing clouds over the earthquake zone. These ionized clouds can appear months, and sometimes even days, before.  While the seconds before an earthquake is important, having such an advantage becomes even more important. "In order to form an ionized cloud or ionized fog, the depth of the earthquake must not exceed 10 km. On the other hand, the humidity must be higher than 60 percent on the ground," Karel adds.  Ionizing clouds not only provide data for earthquake predictions, but the center Karel heads suggests they might also provide data and explanations for some "unexplained" plane crashes.  Efforts to strengthen forecasting mechanisms  According to Carrell, “The relationship between earthquake and atmosphere is not being worked out by amateur researchers, but by world-renowned universities and scientific committees. It is not possible to know where or when earthquakes will occur. Predicting an earthquake does not prevent an earthquake and its damage, but prediction using more More parameters strengthen people's hand in precautions to be taken. In recent years, more seismologists have started working with other disciplines as well."  He argues that the relationship between solar wind and earthquakes must also be investigated. Noting that observations of the atmosphere and space can be made thanks to observation and navigation satellites, Karel says: "The world is not only exposed to electromagnetic storms due to solar flares and solar winds, but also under the influence of many gas molecules."  Karel says that his goal is to strengthen the estimation mechanism, especially for cities like Istanbul, which are in an earthquake zone and that he has started to collect the knowledge he has acquired for this purpose in an encyclopedic work comprising about 3,250 pages so far.  Karel is always a guest of various institutions in Turkey and around the world to talk about his work and theory. Karel, who spoke about ionizing clouds at NASA in 2014, was invited by Turkey's Disaster and Emergency Management Authority (AFAD) in 2016 and his views were heard.

Although it is not possible to predict where it will occur and how severe it will strike, there are many studies of earthquakes. One such study is the relationship between earthquakes and clouds devised by the Turkish-French researcher Ronald Carrell and promoted for more than half a century.

Professor Ronald Carrel, who holds Turkish and French citizenship, has worked to understand the relationship between earthquakes and clouds since he discovered some different cloud formations before the earthquake in the 1970s.

When Carrel was a child in the 1970s, he noticed that some clouds had begun to form before the earthquake and began to research the earthquake's relationship to clouds. He drew attention to his ability to predict some earthquakes and tried to transfer this research to scientific platforms and communities, until in 2014 he succeeded in becoming a senior director at the Geo Cosmo Research Center based in San Francisco, which will have branches in Asia, Europe and America.

Turkish researcher Karel, who spends half the year working in England and the other half in Bodrum, Turkey, continues to forecast earthquakes at the Geo Cosmo Center he has headed in England since 2016, by following ionized cloud formations.

Ronald Carrell , a Frenchman with Turkish citizenship, fell in love with clouds at a young age. Because of this passion, he was expelled from his school because he was not interested in the lessons because he was too busy to follow the drawings. It was in those years that he was expelled from school that he discovered the first seismic clouds. Carel traded his childhood love and youth for the relationship of earthquake and atmosphere, as he devoted most of his life to researching the clouds.

He had a long-standing interest in meteorology, particularly in clouds and unusual cloud formations. When he was 16, on the afternoon of March 28, 1970, he noticed strange "unair clouds" over Istanbul. Over the next night, a 7.2-magnitude earthquake struck near Gediz. The same method, which looks for unusual cloud formations, has led to many earthquake predictions.

After more than 3 decades of continuous rejection of Carrell's theory by universities and scientific communities, but with the 2006 establishment of the Meteoquake Research Center in London, which was joined by many scientists from all over the world, many research groups around the world began to express their interest Carrell's theory, especially after NASA's Dr. Friedman Freund provided evidence that massive ionization of air at the Earth-atmosphere interface may be related to the build-up of tectonic pressures in the Earth's crust before a major earthquake, and thus provided a physical explanation for the first time to support his long-held view Ronald Carell.

ionized clouds

Earthquakes occur in the upper crust of the Earth. Line fractures called "fault lines" can lead to extensive physical damage and loss of life. Geo Cosmo researchers said that although earthquakes cannot be predicted in advance, robust predictions can be made by monitoring clouds, according to a recent report published by TRT Haber .

Accordingly, positive electric current builds up under the rocks on the fault line prior to the earthquake. These currents rise to the surface at a speed of 200 meters per second and begin to form ionizing clouds over the earthquake zone. These ionized clouds can appear months, and sometimes even days, before.

While the seconds before an earthquake is important, having such an advantage becomes even more important. "In order to form an ionized cloud or ionized fog, the depth of the earthquake must not exceed 10 km. On the other hand, the humidity must be higher than 60 percent on the ground," Karel adds.

Ionizing clouds not only provide data for earthquake predictions, but the center Karel heads suggests they might also provide data and explanations for some "unexplained" plane crashes.

Efforts to strengthen forecasting mechanisms

According to Carrell, “The relationship between earthquake and atmosphere is not being worked out by amateur researchers, but by world-renowned universities and scientific committees. It is not possible to know where or when earthquakes will occur. Predicting an earthquake does not prevent an earthquake and its damage, but prediction using more More parameters strengthen people's hand in precautions to be taken. In recent years, more seismologists have started working with other disciplines as well."

He argues that the relationship between solar wind and earthquakes must also be investigated. Noting that observations of the atmosphere and space can be made thanks to observation and navigation satellites, Karel says: "The world is not only exposed to electromagnetic storms due to solar flares and solar winds, but also under the influence of many gas molecules."

Karel says that his goal is to strengthen the estimation mechanism, especially for cities like Istanbul, which are in an earthquake zone and that he has started to collect the knowledge he has acquired for this purpose in an encyclopedic work comprising about 3,250 pages so far.

Karel is always a guest of various institutions in Turkey and around the world to talk about his work and theory. Karel, who spoke about ionizing clouds at NASA in 2014, was invited by Turkey's Disaster and Emergency Management Authority (AFAD) in 2016 and his views were heard.
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