Calcium is the mainstay of bones these are the symptoms of deficiency

Calcium is the mainstay of bones these are the symptoms of deficiency  Calcium is the mainstay of bone health, and it plays many roles in the body, so what are its benefits? What are the symptoms of its deficiency? And how do we get it? What are the types of calcium pills? What are its benefits and harms?  Calcium Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body. It is found in some foods and added to others. It is also found in some medications (such as antacids) and is available as a dietary supplement.  Calcium makes up much of the structure of bones and teeth, and allows for normal body movement by keeping tissues hard, strong and flexible.  Calcium has an important role in blood circulation, various tissues, blood vessel contraction and dilation, muscle function, blood clotting, nerve transmission and hormone secretion, according to the Office of Dietary Supplements of the National Institutes of Health in the United States.  Calcium benefits Your body needs calcium to build and maintain strong bones. More than 99% of the calcium in your body is stored in your bones and teeth.  In the bloodstream, calcium is used to send nerve signals, release hormones such as insulin, and regulate how muscles and blood vessels contract and expand.  Calcium deficiency symptoms Calcium deficiency in the early stage may not cause any symptoms. However, symptoms will develop as the condition progresses, according to a report on the Health Line website .   Symptoms of severe hypocalcemia include the following:  Confusion or memory loss Muscle spasms Numbness and tingling in the hands, feet, and face Depression Hallucination Muscle cramps Weak and brittle nails Ease of bone fracture Calcium deficiency can affect all parts of the body, resulting in weak nails, slow hair growth, and brittle and thinning skin.  Calcium also plays an important role in both the release of neurotransmitters and muscle contractions. Therefore, calcium deficiency can trigger seizures in otherwise healthy people.  The body's daily need of calcium The following are the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine in the United States regarding the body's need for calcium, according to age:  Women 50 and under: 1,000 mg per day Men 70 and under: 1,000 mg per day Women over 50: 1200 mg daily Men over 70 years: 1200 mg daily There are also recommended upper limits for calcium intake. The maximum is 2500 mg per day for adults up to 50 and 2,000 mg per day for adults over 50.  For most adults, it is recommended to consume at least 1,000 mg of calcium per day, and it is 1,200 mg per day for women over 50 and men over 70.  However some classes may require a different dose. Consult your doctor for how much you should take.  Natural calcium Calcium is the same whether it is in food or pills, but generally natural calcium is meant the calcium found in food.  You can get all the calcium you need daily from food. Calcium-rich foods include yogurt, some leafy green vegetables, tofu, and canned fish.  Here are some examples of calcium-rich foods and how much they contain, according to Webmd :  1 cup low-fat yogurt: 415 mg 177 milliliters of calcium-fortified orange juice: 415 mg 3 ounces (one ounce equals 28 grams) canned sardines in oil: 325 mg Cheddar cheese, 1.5 oz.: 307 mg. A glass of milk: 299 mg. Tofu, ½ cup: 253 mg 1 cup kale (cooked): 94 mg Calcium and Vitamin D Calcium and Vitamin D work together to protect your bones. Calcium helps build and maintain bones, while Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium effectively. Therefore, even if you are taking in enough calcium, it may be lost if you are deficient in vitamin D.  Vitamin D is produced in the body as a result of exposure to ultraviolet B rays from the sun. It can also be obtained from fatty fish such as salmon, swordfish and mackerel, in addition to tuna and sardines, which contain “vitamin D” at lower rates. The vitamin can also be obtained from egg yolks, beef liver, and fortified foods such as cereal and milk.  Calcium pills Many people take calcium supplements in the hope of strengthening their bones. However, this can have harm and even health risks, including an increased risk of heart disease, according to Healthline .  It's very important that if you don't get the recommended amount in your diet, your body will take it from your skeleton and teeth for use elsewhere, weakening your bones.  You can get adequate amounts through your diet, including dairy foods, some leafy greens, nuts, beans and tofu.  However, people who do not eat enough calcium-rich foods may consider taking a calcium supplement.  Categories that may need calcium pills When your calcium intake is insufficient, your body withdraws calcium from your bones, making them weak and brittle. This can lead to osteoporosis.  Since women are more likely to develop osteoporosis, many doctors recommend calcium supplements, especially after menopause.  For this reason, older women are more likely to take calcium supplements. It may help prevent bone loss in postmenopausal women.  After menopause, women lose bone mass due to reduced estrogen. In contrast, several studies have suggested that giving postmenopausal women calcium supplements—usually around 1,000 mg per day—may reduce bone loss by 1-2%.  The effect appears to be greater in women with low calcium intakes - that is, they are already more deficient in calcium - during the first two years of taking the supplement.  Additionally, there does not appear to be any additional benefit to taking higher doses.  It is worth noting that calcium supplements may benefit anyone who does not receive enough calcium from a natural diet. If you do not get the recommended amount through your diet, supplements can help fill the gap.  Calcium Calcium Milk Milk Cheese Dairy Cheese Dairy Heart Heart Infographic  You may also consider taking a calcium supplement if: You are following a vegetarian diet. You are on a high-protein or high-sodium diet, which may cause your body to excrete more calcium. You have a health condition that limits your body's ability to absorb calcium, such as Crohn's disease or inflammatory bowel disease. You have been treated with corticosteroids over a long period of time. You have or have had osteoporosis. Bottom line, calcium supplements may benefit those who don't get enough calcium from food, as well as women who have gone through menopause.  Calcium side effects Recent research suggests that calcium supplements may actually cause some health problems. However, the evidence is mixed, meaning that there is evidence to support that view and others not.  Here are some of the potential harms of calcium supplements:  May increase the risk of heart disease High levels of calcium may be linked to prostate cancer May increase the risk of kidney stones Having high blood calcium (hypercalcemia), a condition that leads to symptoms such as stomach pain, nausea, irritability and depression. Types of calcium pills Calcium supplements come in many different forms, including tablets, capsules, chewables, liquids, and powders.  One of the main differences between these types of supplements is the form of calcium they contain.  The two main forms are:  Calcium carbonate This is the cheapest and most prevalent form. It contains 40% elemental calcium, so it usually provides plenty of calcium in a small serving.  However, this form is more likely to cause side effects, such as gas, bloating and constipation. It is recommended that calcium carbonate be taken with food for optimal absorption.  Calcium citrate This format is more expensive. 21% of it is calcium, which means you may need to take more tablets to get the calcium you need.  However, it is more easily absorbed than calcium carbonate and can be taken with or without food.  Calcium citrate is the recommended form for people with irritable bowel syndrome.  It's also the best choice for those with low levels of stomach acid, a condition common among older adults and those taking acid reflux medications.  How Much Calcium Pills Should You Take? If you see your doctor and decide that you need to take calcium pills, then you can take them to bridge the gap between the amount of calcium you get in your diet and the amount you need daily.  The recommended amount for most adults is 1,000 mg per day and increases to 1,200 mg per day for women over 50 and men over 70.  So, if you normally only get about 500 mg per day through food, and you need 1,000 mg per day, you can take one supplement of 500 mg per day.  However, choose your dose wisely; Taking more calcium than you need can cause problems.  Calcium pills for pregnant women If a pregnant woman has a milk allergy, lactose intolerance, or is a vegetarian, getting enough calcium from food can be difficult, at which point your doctor may recommend a calcium supplement.  Pregnant women should not take calcium supplements without consulting a doctor. Your doctor will check your diet and determine how much calcium you need through supplementation daily.  Calcium drug interactions Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist if you're taking calcium supplements, as they can interfere with how your body processes certain medications, including antibiotics and iron.  Calcium also competes with iron, zinc, and magnesium for absorption; If you are deficient in any of these minerals and also need to take a calcium supplement, try taking them between meals. That way, the calcium is less likely to prevent the absorption of the zinc, iron and magnesium you take in your meal.  Disadvantages of excess calcium Remember that you only need 1000-1200 mg of calcium each day. There is no point in taking more than that. In fact, you may encounter problems if you do this.  These problems include constipation, hypercalcemia, calcium buildup in tissues, and difficulty absorbing iron and zinc.

Calcium is the mainstay of bone health, and it plays many roles in the body, so what are its benefits? What are the symptoms of its deficiency? And how do we get it? What are the types of calcium pills? What are its benefits and harms?

Calcium
Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body. It is found in some foods and added to others. It is also found in some medications (such as antacids) and is available as a dietary supplement.

Calcium makes up much of the structure of bones and teeth, and allows for normal body movement by keeping tissues hard, strong and flexible.

Calcium has an important role in blood circulation, various tissues, blood vessel contraction and dilation, muscle function, blood clotting, nerve transmission and hormone secretion, according to the Office of Dietary Supplements of the National Institutes of Health in the United States.

Calcium benefits
Your body needs calcium to build and maintain strong bones. More than 99% of the calcium in your body is stored in your bones and teeth.

In the bloodstream, calcium is used to send nerve signals, release hormones such as insulin, and regulate how muscles and blood vessels contract and expand.

Calcium deficiency symptoms
Calcium deficiency in the early stage may not cause any symptoms. However, symptoms will develop as the condition progresses, according to a report on the Health Line website .


Symptoms of severe hypocalcemia include the following:

Confusion or memory loss
Muscle spasms
Numbness and tingling in the hands, feet, and face
Depression
Hallucination
Muscle cramps
Weak and brittle nails
Ease of bone fracture
Calcium deficiency can affect all parts of the body, resulting in weak nails, slow hair growth, and brittle and thinning skin.

Calcium also plays an important role in both the release of neurotransmitters and muscle contractions. Therefore, calcium deficiency can trigger seizures in otherwise healthy people.

The body's daily need of calcium
The following are the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine in the United States regarding the body's need for calcium, according to age:

Women 50 and under: 1,000 mg per day
Men 70 and under: 1,000 mg per day
Women over 50: 1200 mg daily
Men over 70 years: 1200 mg daily
There are also recommended upper limits for calcium intake. The maximum is 2500 mg per day for adults up to 50 and 2,000 mg per day for adults over 50.

For most adults, it is recommended to consume at least 1,000 mg of calcium per day, and it is 1,200 mg per day for women over 50 and men over 70.

However some classes may require a different dose. Consult your doctor for how much you should take.

Natural calcium
Calcium is the same whether it is in food or pills, but generally natural calcium is meant the calcium found in food.

You can get all the calcium you need daily from food. Calcium-rich foods include yogurt, some leafy green vegetables, tofu, and canned fish.

Here are some examples of calcium-rich foods and how much they contain, according to Webmd :

1 cup low-fat yogurt: 415 mg
177 milliliters of calcium-fortified orange juice: 415 mg
3 ounces (one ounce equals 28 grams) canned sardines in oil: 325 mg
Cheddar cheese, 1.5 oz.: 307 mg.
A glass of milk: 299 mg.
Tofu, ½ cup: 253 mg
1 cup kale (cooked): 94 mg
Calcium and Vitamin D
Calcium and Vitamin D work together to protect your bones. Calcium helps build and maintain bones, while Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium effectively. Therefore, even if you are taking in enough calcium, it may be lost if you are deficient in vitamin D.

Vitamin D is produced in the body as a result of exposure to ultraviolet B rays from the sun. It can also be obtained from fatty fish such as salmon, swordfish and mackerel, in addition to tuna and sardines, which contain “vitamin D” at lower rates. The vitamin can also be obtained from egg yolks, beef liver, and fortified foods such as cereal and milk.

Calcium pills
Many people take calcium supplements in the hope of strengthening their bones. However, this can have harm and even health risks, including an increased risk of heart disease, according to Healthline .

It's very important that if you don't get the recommended amount in your diet, your body will take it from your skeleton and teeth for use elsewhere, weakening your bones.

You can get adequate amounts through your diet, including dairy foods, some leafy greens, nuts, beans and tofu.

However, people who do not eat enough calcium-rich foods may consider taking a calcium supplement.

Categories that may need calcium pills
When your calcium intake is insufficient, your body withdraws calcium from your bones, making them weak and brittle. This can lead to osteoporosis.

Since women are more likely to develop osteoporosis, many doctors recommend calcium supplements, especially after menopause.

For this reason, older women are more likely to take calcium supplements. It may help prevent bone loss in postmenopausal women.

After menopause, women lose bone mass due to reduced estrogen. In contrast, several studies have suggested that giving postmenopausal women calcium supplements—usually around 1,000 mg per day—may reduce bone loss by 1-2%.

The effect appears to be greater in women with low calcium intakes - that is, they are already more deficient in calcium - during the first two years of taking the supplement.

Additionally, there does not appear to be any additional benefit to taking higher doses.

It is worth noting that calcium supplements may benefit anyone who does not receive enough calcium from a natural diet. If you do not get the recommended amount through your diet, supplements can help fill the gap.

Calcium Calcium Milk Milk Cheese Dairy Cheese Dairy Heart Heart Infographic

You may also consider taking a calcium supplement if:
You are following a vegetarian diet.
You are on a high-protein or high-sodium diet, which may cause your body to excrete more calcium.
You have a health condition that limits your body's ability to absorb calcium, such as Crohn's disease or inflammatory bowel disease.
You have been treated with corticosteroids over a long period of time.
You have or have had osteoporosis.
Bottom line, calcium supplements may benefit those who don't get enough calcium from food, as well as women who have gone through menopause.

Calcium side effects
Recent research suggests that calcium supplements may actually cause some health problems. However, the evidence is mixed, meaning that there is evidence to support that view and others not.

Here are some of the potential harms of calcium supplements:

May increase the risk of heart disease
High levels of calcium may be linked to prostate cancer
May increase the risk of kidney stones
Having high blood calcium (hypercalcemia), a condition that leads to symptoms such as stomach pain, nausea, irritability and depression.
Types of calcium pills
Calcium supplements come in many different forms, including tablets, capsules, chewables, liquids, and powders.

One of the main differences between these types of supplements is the form of calcium they contain.

The two main forms are:

Calcium carbonate
This is the cheapest and most prevalent form. It contains 40% elemental calcium, so it usually provides plenty of calcium in a small serving.

However, this form is more likely to cause side effects, such as gas, bloating and constipation. It is recommended that calcium carbonate be taken with food for optimal absorption.

Calcium citrate
This format is more expensive. 21% of it is calcium, which means you may need to take more tablets to get the calcium you need.

However, it is more easily absorbed than calcium carbonate and can be taken with or without food.

Calcium citrate is the recommended form for people with irritable bowel syndrome.

It's also the best choice for those with low levels of stomach acid, a condition common among older adults and those taking acid reflux medications.

How Much Calcium Pills Should You Take?
If you see your doctor and decide that you need to take calcium pills, then you can take them to bridge the gap between the amount of calcium you get in your diet and the amount you need daily.

The recommended amount for most adults is 1,000 mg per day and increases to 1,200 mg per day for women over 50 and men over 70.

So, if you normally only get about 500 mg per day through food, and you need 1,000 mg per day, you can take one supplement of 500 mg per day.

However, choose your dose wisely; Taking more calcium than you need can cause problems.

Calcium pills for pregnant women
If a pregnant woman has a milk allergy, lactose intolerance, or is a vegetarian, getting enough calcium from food can be difficult, at which point your doctor may recommend a calcium supplement.

Pregnant women should not take calcium supplements without consulting a doctor. Your doctor will check your diet and determine how much calcium you need through supplementation daily.

Calcium drug interactions
Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist if you're taking calcium supplements, as they can interfere with how your body processes certain medications, including antibiotics and iron.

Calcium also competes with iron, zinc, and magnesium for absorption; If you are deficient in any of these minerals and also need to take a calcium supplement, try taking them between meals. That way, the calcium is less likely to prevent the absorption of the zinc, iron and magnesium you take in your meal.

Disadvantages of excess calcium
Remember that you only need 1000-1200 mg of calcium each day. There is no point in taking more than that. In fact, you may encounter problems if you do this.

These problems include constipation, hypercalcemia, calcium buildup in tissues, and difficulty absorbing iron and zinc.
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