Hand tremor Is it normal? And what are its causes?

Hand tremor Is it normal? And what are its causes?  You must have experienced a moment in which your hands tremor, so what are the causes of tremors in the hands? Is it dangerous? And what are the treatment options?  Is hand tremor dangerous? Mild tremors that aren't caused by another condition usually don't need any treatment. Your GP may want to monitor you to make sure it doesn't get worse, according to the UK's National Health Service.  Your GP may refer you to a specialist for further testing if they suspect that your tremor may be a symptom of a condition such as Parkinson's disease or multiple sclerosis.  Is trembling hands normal? Hand tremors are normal, especially if the person is feeling nervous, anxious, or not sleeping enough.  Tremor types Before understanding the causes of hand tremor, we must learn about the types of tremor that affect the body:  Physiological tremor Physiological tremor is a mild tremor that can hardly be seen with the naked eye, and is present in every normal person while maintaining posture or movement. Neurological examination results for patients with physiological tremor are usually normal, according to the Cleveland Clinic.  Enhanced Physiologic Tremor Physiological enhanced tremor is a visible tremor. Drugs and toxins may cause this type of tremor, and symptoms may improve after the causative agents are stopped.  Essential Tremor It is the most common form of all movement disorders, and it is a disorder of the nervous system that causes involuntary and regular shaking, and it can affect almost any part of your body, but tremors often occur in your hands, especially when doing simple tasks, such as drinking from a glass or tying shoelaces, According to the Mayo Clinic.  Idiopathic tremor is not usually a serious condition, but it usually worsens over time and can be severe in some people. It can occur at any age but is most common in people 40 years of age or older.  Causes of hand tremor Hand tremors or tremors in the hands can be normal or may result from neurological conditions, health problems, or the use of medications, according to a report in Medical News Today .  Here are some possible causes of hand tremors:  Tremor of unknown cause The most common cause of hand tremor is idiopathic tremor, which most often affects adults, and is believed to be caused by a disturbance in the normal functioning of parts of the central nervous system, such as the cerebellum, according to a report in Health Line .  This type of tremor sometimes runs in families, and it is believed that about 50% of cases of essential tremor are hereditary.  Parkinson's disease People with Parkinson's disease typically experience tremors in the hand when their muscles are at rest and see a reduction in tremor when using their muscles. This is called resting tremors.  But about a quarter of people with Parkinson's disease also have an action tremor, or a tremor that occurs when muscles are used.  Tremors are usually an early sign of Parkinson's disease. Most people experience shaking on one side of their body, but it can spread over time. Stress, anxiety or excitement can make shaking worse.  Brain attack A stroke occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery that supplies blood to your brain. This prevents blood and oxygen from reaching the brain.  Long-term and permanent damage can occur if a stroke isn't treated right away, and any permanent damage can affect the nerve pathways in your brain and cause tremors in your hands.  Hyperthyroidism The thyroid gland is a gland in your neck located just above your collar bone that produces hormones that help provide your body with energy, and uses those hormones to regulate your metabolism.  If you produce too many hormones, you may have a metabolic condition known as hyperthyroidism that makes your body more active than it should be. It can also cause problems such as:  Increased heart rate Trouble sleeping Trembling hands Cerebellar disorders Cerebellar disorders are a group of disorders that affect the cerebellum, an area of ​​the brain that controls balance and coordination. Damage to this part of your brain can interrupt the complex pathways that control movement and coordination.  Huntington's disease Huntington's disease is a condition that causes the gradual breakdown of nerve cells in your brain. One of the most common signs of Huntington's disease is tremors.  Brain injury Physical injury can impair the normal functioning of your brain. Damage to the brain can affect physical movement.  Injury to the brain may occur from an accident, such as a car crash or fall, as well as from activities such as sports.  Medication side effects Hand tremors can be the result of side effects of medications, such as:  Some asthma medications Medicines for psychiatric conditions, such as some antidepressants Epilepsy drugs Medicines that suppress the immune system Corticosteroids Some antiviral drugs Some antibiotics Multiple sclerosis Multiple sclerosis is a progressive disease that occurs when your body's immune system attacks your brain, nerves and spinal cord. This can lead to problems such as infections and lesions in your central nervous system and brain.  As the damage worsens, symptoms such as hand tremors may develop.  Other symptoms of MS include:  Changes in speech Difficulty swallowing or chewing Bladder control problems Drink a lot of caffeine Too much caffeine can lead to trembling hands, because caffeine stimulates the muscles of the body.  Worry Stress and anxiety are a fact of everyday life for many people. When you feel stressed and anxious, your body responds by releasing a surge of adrenaline, a hormone that helps control your body's energy.  This sudden rush of adrenaline can cause your heart to race and increase blood flow to your brain, and it may also cause your hand to tremble.  Low blood sugar Low blood sugar occurs when your body doesn't have enough glucose to fuel your activities, and skipping meals, taking too much medication, exercising too much, or eating too little can cause blood glucose levels to fall.  When your blood sugar levels drop too low, your body launches its stress response, and this can make your hands tremble and jittery.  Other symptoms of low blood sugar include:  Sudden nervousness Fast heartbeat Trouble thinking Sweating Dizziness For people with diabetes, low blood sugar can be dangerous. If left untreated, it may lead to unconsciousness, seizure or coma.  Hand tremor treatment There are several options, including:  Medicines to treat tremors of the hands According to the National Tremor Foundation, the most common medications prescribed to treat shaky hands due to idiopathic tremor are:  -Propranolol (propranolol) -Primidone -Other beta-blockers, such as metoprolol and atenolol -Other anti-seizure medications such as gabapentin and topiramate -Botox to treat tremors of the hands (Botox) Botox is showing promising results as a treatment for idiopathic tremor in the hands. This medication may cause significant muscle weakness when injected, so be sure to talk to your doctor about the potential risks and benefits, according to a report in Healthline.  The benefits of a successful injection can last up to 3 months. Subsequent injections may be required.  Surgery to treat tremor of the hands Your doctor is unlikely to recommend surgery as a first treatment option. Surgical treatment is usually limited to people with severely disabling tremor. Surgery may become an option as you age or if the tremor worsens.  Deep brain stimulation Deep brain stimulation is a surgical procedure used to treat tremor. During deep brain stimulation, the surgeon places electronic devices called electrodes in your brain that receive an electronic signal that interferes with the brain activity responsible for tremors.  The signal travels from a device implanted under the skin of your upper chest, but deep brain stimulation is currently recommended only for people with advanced or severe limb tremor.  Thalamotomy During this procedure, the surgeon will use radiofrequency sound waves to create a permanent lesion in a very small area of ​​the thalamus in the brain. An MRI is used to guide the waves, and this interrupts the typical electrical activity of the brain and reduces or stops the tremors.

You must have experienced a moment in which your hands tremor, so what are the causes of tremors in the hands? Is it dangerous? And what are the treatment options?

Is hand tremor dangerous?
Mild tremors that aren't caused by another condition usually don't need any treatment. Your GP may want to monitor you to make sure it doesn't get worse, according to the UK's National Health Service.

Your GP may refer you to a specialist for further testing if they suspect that your tremor may be a symptom of a condition such as Parkinson's disease or multiple sclerosis.

Is trembling hands normal?
Hand tremors are normal, especially if the person is feeling nervous, anxious, or not sleeping enough.

Tremor types
Before understanding the causes of hand tremor, we must learn about the types of tremor that affect the body:

Physiological tremor
Physiological tremor is a mild tremor that can hardly be seen with the naked eye, and is present in every normal person while maintaining posture or movement. Neurological examination results for patients with physiological tremor are usually normal, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

Enhanced Physiologic Tremor
Physiological enhanced tremor is a visible tremor. Drugs and toxins may cause this type of tremor, and symptoms may improve after the causative agents are stopped.

Essential Tremor
It is the most common form of all movement disorders, and it is a disorder of the nervous system that causes involuntary and regular shaking, and it can affect almost any part of your body, but tremors often occur in your hands, especially when doing simple tasks, such as drinking from a glass or tying shoelaces, According to the Mayo Clinic.

Idiopathic tremor is not usually a serious condition, but it usually worsens over time and can be severe in some people. It can occur at any age but is most common in people 40 years of age or older.

Causes of hand tremor
Hand tremors or tremors in the hands can be normal or may result from neurological conditions, health problems, or the use of medications, according to a report in Medical News Today .

Here are some possible causes of hand tremors:

Tremor of unknown cause
The most common cause of hand tremor is idiopathic tremor, which most often affects adults, and is believed to be caused by a disturbance in the normal functioning of parts of the central nervous system, such as the cerebellum, according to a report in Health Line .

This type of tremor sometimes runs in families, and it is believed that about 50% of cases of essential tremor are hereditary.

Parkinson's disease
People with Parkinson's disease typically experience tremors in the hand when their muscles are at rest and see a reduction in tremor when using their muscles. This is called resting tremors.

But about a quarter of people with Parkinson's disease also have an action tremor, or a tremor that occurs when muscles are used.

Tremors are usually an early sign of Parkinson's disease. Most people experience shaking on one side of their body, but it can spread over time. Stress, anxiety or excitement can make shaking worse.

Brain attack
A stroke occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery that supplies blood to your brain. This prevents blood and oxygen from reaching the brain.

Long-term and permanent damage can occur if a stroke isn't treated right away, and any permanent damage can affect the nerve pathways in your brain and cause tremors in your hands.

Hyperthyroidism
The thyroid gland is a gland in your neck located just above your collar bone that produces hormones that help provide your body with energy, and uses those hormones to regulate your metabolism.

If you produce too many hormones, you may have a metabolic condition known as hyperthyroidism that makes your body more active than it should be. It can also cause problems such as:

Increased heart rate
Trouble sleeping
Trembling hands
Cerebellar disorders
Cerebellar disorders are a group of disorders that affect the cerebellum, an area of ​​the brain that controls balance and coordination. Damage to this part of your brain can interrupt the complex pathways that control movement and coordination.

Huntington's disease
Huntington's disease is a condition that causes the gradual breakdown of nerve cells in your brain. One of the most common signs of Huntington's disease is tremors.

Brain injury
Physical injury can impair the normal functioning of your brain. Damage to the brain can affect physical movement.

Injury to the brain may occur from an accident, such as a car crash or fall, as well as from activities such as sports.

Medication side effects
Hand tremors can be the result of side effects of medications, such as:

Some asthma medications
Medicines for psychiatric conditions, such as some antidepressants
Epilepsy drugs
Medicines that suppress the immune system
Corticosteroids
Some antiviral drugs
Some antibiotics
Multiple sclerosis
Multiple sclerosis is a progressive disease that occurs when your body's immune system attacks your brain, nerves and spinal cord. This can lead to problems such as infections and lesions in your central nervous system and brain.

As the damage worsens, symptoms such as hand tremors may develop.

Other symptoms of MS include:

Changes in speech
Difficulty swallowing or chewing
Bladder control problems
Drink a lot of caffeine
Too much caffeine can lead to trembling hands, because caffeine stimulates the muscles of the body.

Worry
Stress and anxiety are a fact of everyday life for many people. When you feel stressed and anxious, your body responds by releasing a surge of adrenaline, a hormone that helps control your body's energy.

This sudden rush of adrenaline can cause your heart to race and increase blood flow to your brain, and it may also cause your hand to tremble.

Low blood sugar
Low blood sugar occurs when your body doesn't have enough glucose to fuel your activities, and skipping meals, taking too much medication, exercising too much, or eating too little can cause blood glucose levels to fall.

When your blood sugar levels drop too low, your body launches its stress response, and this can make your hands tremble and jittery.

Other symptoms of low blood sugar include:

Sudden nervousness
Fast heartbeat
Trouble thinking
Sweating
Dizziness
For people with diabetes, low blood sugar can be dangerous. If left untreated, it may lead to unconsciousness, seizure or coma.

Hand tremor treatment
There are several options, including:

Medicines to treat tremors of the hands
According to the National Tremor Foundation, the most common medications prescribed to treat shaky hands due to idiopathic tremor are:

-Propranolol (propranolol)
-Primidone
-Other beta-blockers, such as metoprolol and atenolol
-Other anti-seizure medications such as gabapentin and topiramate
-Botox to treat tremors of the hands (Botox)
Botox is showing promising results as a treatment for idiopathic tremor in the hands. This medication may cause significant muscle weakness when injected, so be sure to talk to your doctor about the potential risks and benefits, according to a report in Healthline.

The benefits of a successful injection can last up to 3 months. Subsequent injections may be required.

Surgery to treat tremor of the hands
Your doctor is unlikely to recommend surgery as a first treatment option. Surgical treatment is usually limited to people with severely disabling tremor. Surgery may become an option as you age or if the tremor worsens.

Deep brain stimulation
Deep brain stimulation is a surgical procedure used to treat tremor. During deep brain stimulation, the surgeon places electronic devices called electrodes in your brain that receive an electronic signal that interferes with the brain activity responsible for tremors.

The signal travels from a device implanted under the skin of your upper chest, but deep brain stimulation is currently recommended only for people with advanced or severe limb tremor.

Thalamotomy
During this procedure, the surgeon will use radiofrequency sound waves to create a permanent lesion in a very small area of ​​the thalamus in the brain. An MRI is used to guide the waves, and this interrupts the typical electrical activity of the brain and reduces or stops the tremors.
Previous Post Next Post

Translate / Choose Your Language

Answer / Free classified ads / Any information me ⤵️