7 signs that tell you that you should stop exercising immediately

7 signs that tell you that you should stop exercising immediately  As you exercise, you suddenly feel tired, so when is this an indication of something serious? And when did the exercise stop immediately?  The answers to this report, which responds to another question: Is it possible to exercise despite feeling tired, and are there any harms to that?  When should you stop exercising immediately?  Pain in chest "Chest pain is not at all normal or expected," says Dr. Martha Gulati, editor-in-chief of CardioSmart, the Patient Education Initiative of the American College of Cardiology .  In rare cases, she adds, exercise can cause a heart attack. If you feel chest pain or pressure - especially next to nausea, vomiting, dizziness, shortness of breath or heavy sweating - stop exercising immediately and call 911.  Suddenly feeling short of breath If your breath doesn't quicken when you exercise, you probably aren't working hard enough. But there is a difference between shortness of breath caused by exercise and shortness of breath due to a possible heart attack, heart failure, asthma caused by exercise or another condition.  Dr. Gulati says: If there is an activity that you can do easily and you suddenly feel sluggish, stop exercising and see your doctor.  Vertigo If you feel dizzy, it probably means that you are pushing yourself too hard or not eating or drinking enough before exercising. But if stopping for water or a snack doesn't help, or if your dizziness is accompanied by profuse sweating, confusion, or even fainting, you may need emergency care.  These symptoms could be a sign of dehydration, diabetes, a problem with blood pressure, or perhaps a problem with the nervous system.  Dizziness can also indicate a heart valve problem, says Gulati.  Personal trainer Carlos Torres says, "No exercise should make you feel dizzy or dizzy. It's a sure sign that something is not right..."  Legs cramp Leg cramps should not be ignored, as this occurring during exercise could indicate a blockage in the main artery to your leg.  Cramps can also occur in the arms, and no matter where they occur, "that's reason to stop," says Dr. Mark Conroy, MD, an emergency physician and sports medicine at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus.  Although the exact cause of cramps isn't fully understood, it's thought to be related to dehydration or an electrolyte imbalance.  "I think it's safe to say that the number one cause of cramping is dehydration," says Conroy, and low potassium levels could also be one of the reasons.  To ease cramps, Conroy recommends "cooling them" and suggests wrapping a wet towel around the affected area or applying an ice pack. He also recommends massaging the cramped muscle while stretching it.  Troubled heartbeat If you have atrial fibrillation, a heart rhythm disorder, or another heart rhythm disorder, it's important to watch your heartbeat and seek emergency care when symptoms appear.  You may also feel fluttering or shivering in the chest, and this requires medical attention.  Your sweat levels are suddenly increasing If you notice a significant increase in sweat when doing an exercise that doesn't normally cause that amount, it could be a sign of a problem, says Torres. "Sweat is our way of calming the body, and when the body is stressed, it will overcompensate."  Therefore, if you cannot explain the increased perspiration caused by weather conditions, it is best to take a break and determine if something is serious.  Your heart rate does not decrease with rest It's important to "pay attention to your heart rate" during exercise to see if it matches your effort, Torres says.  "We exercise to raise the heart rate, of course, but it should start during the rest periods. And if your heart rate is high or it is beating out of rhythm, it is time to stop."  Don't ignore these signs Not paying attention to these signs can lead to injury, Torres notes, "and potentially fatal. Not paying attention to your body and your heart can put your heart at risk of cardiac arrest and [this] has lasting effects."  This can affect other internal organs, such as depriving them of enough oxygen to continue functioning normally.  Tips before exercising Consult your doctor, especially if you are at risk of developing heart disease. It is important that you talk to him before starting an exercise plan, so that you can exercise safely.   Heart disease risk factors include:  Hypertension. High fat. Diabetic. Smoking. Having a family history of heart disease, heart attack, or sudden death from a heart problem.  Exercising despite feeling tired You might be planning to do some exercise or even a run, but at the same time you feel tired and exhausted, whether after long hours of work or a night shift. Does exercise become in this case harmful to the body?  Fatigue is a warning from the body that there is a lack of one of the following elements: sleep, oxygen, fluids, nutrients or exercise.  If you plan to do a training session despite feeling tired and tired, it is best to do a light session or postpone it, according to a report in Deutsche Welle .  Stay away from sports like this If you feel tired, it is a sign of a lack of energy. But it also means that the body has less energy to train or exercise. So when you are tired, it is not recommended to exercise.  Exercise and fatigue are opposites. If you have to work irregular hours, you should consider these circumstances when planning exercise and running.  Trainers advise caution when doing early morning running exercises, especially after a night shift. Because the body is stressed in this case, and needs some time to charge more energy to do sports.

As you exercise, you suddenly feel tired, so when is this an indication of something serious? And when did the exercise stop immediately?

The answers to this report, which responds to another question: Is it possible to exercise despite feeling tired, and are there any harms to that?

When should you stop exercising immediately?

Pain in chest
"Chest pain is not at all normal or expected," says Dr. Martha Gulati, editor-in-chief of CardioSmart, the Patient Education Initiative of the American College of Cardiology .

In rare cases, she adds, exercise can cause a heart attack. If you feel chest pain or pressure - especially next to nausea, vomiting, dizziness, shortness of breath or heavy sweating - stop exercising immediately and call 911.

Suddenly feeling short of breath
If your breath doesn't quicken when you exercise, you probably aren't working hard enough. But there is a difference between shortness of breath caused by exercise and shortness of breath due to a possible heart attack, heart failure, asthma caused by exercise or another condition.

Dr. Gulati says: If there is an activity that you can do easily and you suddenly feel sluggish, stop exercising and see your doctor.

Vertigo
If you feel dizzy, it probably means that you are pushing yourself too hard or not eating or drinking enough before exercising. But if stopping for water or a snack doesn't help, or if your dizziness is accompanied by profuse sweating, confusion, or even fainting, you may need emergency care.

These symptoms could be a sign of dehydration, diabetes, a problem with blood pressure, or perhaps a problem with the nervous system.

Dizziness can also indicate a heart valve problem, says Gulati.

Personal trainer Carlos Torres says, "No exercise should make you feel dizzy or dizzy. It's a sure sign that something is not right..."

Legs cramp
Leg cramps should not be ignored, as this occurring during exercise could indicate a blockage in the main artery to your leg.

Cramps can also occur in the arms, and no matter where they occur, "that's reason to stop," says Dr. Mark Conroy, MD, an emergency physician and sports medicine at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus.

Although the exact cause of cramps isn't fully understood, it's thought to be related to dehydration or an electrolyte imbalance.

"I think it's safe to say that the number one cause of cramping is dehydration," says Conroy, and low potassium levels could also be one of the reasons.

To ease cramps, Conroy recommends "cooling them" and suggests wrapping a wet towel around the affected area or applying an ice pack. He also recommends massaging the cramped muscle while stretching it.

Troubled heartbeat
If you have atrial fibrillation, a heart rhythm disorder, or another heart rhythm disorder, it's important to watch your heartbeat and seek emergency care when symptoms appear.

You may also feel fluttering or shivering in the chest, and this requires medical attention.

Your sweat levels are suddenly increasing
If you notice a significant increase in sweat when doing an exercise that doesn't normally cause that amount, it could be a sign of a problem, says Torres. "Sweat is our way of calming the body, and when the body is stressed, it will overcompensate."

Therefore, if you cannot explain the increased perspiration caused by weather conditions, it is best to take a break and determine if something is serious.

Your heart rate does not decrease with rest
It's important to "pay attention to your heart rate" during exercise to see if it matches your effort, Torres says.

"We exercise to raise the heart rate, of course, but it should start during the rest periods. And if your heart rate is high or it is beating out of rhythm, it is time to stop."

Don't ignore these signs
Not paying attention to these signs can lead to injury, Torres notes, "and potentially fatal. Not paying attention to your body and your heart can put your heart at risk of cardiac arrest and [this] has lasting effects."

This can affect other internal organs, such as depriving them of enough oxygen to continue functioning normally.

Tips before exercising
Consult your doctor, especially if you are at risk of developing heart disease. It is important that you talk to him before starting an exercise plan, so that you can exercise safely.


Heart disease risk factors include:

Hypertension.
High fat.
Diabetic.
Smoking.
Having a family history of heart disease, heart attack, or sudden death from a heart problem.

Exercising despite feeling tired
You might be planning to do some exercise or even a run, but at the same time you feel tired and exhausted, whether after long hours of work or a night shift. Does exercise become in this case harmful to the body?

Fatigue is a warning from the body that there is a lack of one of the following elements: sleep, oxygen, fluids, nutrients or exercise.

If you plan to do a training session despite feeling tired and tired, it is best to do a light session or postpone it, according to a report in Deutsche Welle .

Stay away from sports like this
If you feel tired, it is a sign of a lack of energy. But it also means that the body has less energy to train or exercise. So when you are tired, it is not recommended to exercise.

Exercise and fatigue are opposites. If you have to work irregular hours, you should consider these circumstances when planning exercise and running.

Trainers advise caution when doing early morning running exercises, especially after a night shift. Because the body is stressed in this case, and needs some time to charge more energy to do sports.
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