The number of times you go to the bathroom per day indicates the risk of diabetes and heart disease

The number of times you go to the bathroom per day indicates the risk of diabetes and heart disease  A recent study found that the frequency of bowel movement (the number of times one goes to the bathroom to defecate daily) may indicate the risk of diabetes and heart disease, so what is the ideal rate of entering the bathroom that is associated with the lowest risk of these diseases?  The study was conducted by Chinese scientists, and was published in the journal " BMJ Open", and the website "diabetes.co.uk" wrote about it.  Causes of Constipation Intestines Stomach Dietary Fibers Digestive System Infographic  The number of defecation times per day Using data from China Kadoorie Biobank, the researchers enrolled 487,198 participants between the ages of 30 and 79 in the study.  The initial baseline survey was conducted from 2004 to 2008, with follow-up starting thereafter and continuing for an average of 10 years.  The frequency of bowel movements (the number of bowel movements per day) was assessed with participants answering the question "How often do you have a bowel movement each week?" The four responses available were: more than once a day, once a day, once every 2-3 days, or less than 3 times a week.  The number of times to enter the bathroom After an average follow-up of 10.1 years, the researchers found the following findings on bathroom frequency:  Going to the bathroom more than once a day Researchers found a higher risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD), heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), type 2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in participants who reported going. For the bathroom to defecate more than once a day, compared to the group that went once a day.  Going to the bathroom less than 3 times a week The researchers found that participants who reported fewer than 3 bowel movements per week - meaning they were constipated - had an increased risk of ischemic heart disease, " major coronary events", stroke and chronic kidney disease.  Major coronary events are defined as myocardial infarction, ischemic heart failure, "unstable angina" or sudden death.  Therefore, the findings suggest that reduced bowel movements may carry an increased risk of heart attack.  "Based on findings from current and previous studies, people with 'abnormal bowel movement frequency' should consider the possibility of developing undiagnosed disease and be aware of potential future risks of various health conditions," the researchers add.  The normal rate of going to the bathroom per day We must stress here that these results are from a study, which means that it is not possible to base them on a scientific definition of the number of times entering the bathroom.  However, based on this study alone, it can be said that "it appears that the normal rate of defecation is about once a day", which does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of diabetes and heart disease. However, this is a general conclusion, and you may be exposed to these diseases even if you only go to the bathroom once a day. Always consult a doctor, and ask him if you feel a change in your bowel movement, increase or decrease, or if your stool is very loose or hard.  Bowel movement Moving on from the study, to talk more about bowel movement, which we will divide into two parts:  Frequent bowel movements It is a condition in which a person defecates more than usual. There is no "normal" number of bowel movements, and a "normal" person's pattern may differ from these numbers. Saying that bowel movements are becoming more frequent is based on an increase in that person's habitual pattern, not on a standard definition that applies to everyone, according to the Cleveland Clinic.  But in general, diarrhea can be defined as more than 3 times of defecation of loose stools per day.  What causes frequent bowel movements? Some cases of frequent bowel movements last only a short time and are not a cause for concern. It can be caused by digestive upset from eating spoiled, fatty or spicy foods, or food that is intolerable.  Other possible causes of frequent bowel movements include increased physical exercise, certain medications such as antibiotics or metformin, or a change in diet (more fiber, water, fats or sugars). Bowel movements may return to normal after a person adjusts to these changes or makes adjustments to their diet.  There may be other causes of frequent bowel movement, including the following:  Bacterial infection; C. difficile infection (which can be serious if left untreated). Viral infection. Parasitic infections such as worms or parasites. Diverticulitis (small pockets along the wall of the colon that fill with stagnant stool and become inflamed). Inflammatory bowel disease (a group of disorders, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, that cause irritation and swelling in the digestive system). pancreatitis. Celiac disease ( an autoimmune disease that causes sensitivity to gluten, a protein found in grains such as wheat, rye or barley). Cancer of the colon or elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract. Food allergy. Gallbladder problems. Lactose intolerance. Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Side effects of medications (including antacids, laxatives, and stool softeners). Foods and drinks, including some herbs, herbal teas, and caffeine. Use of antibiotics, which can disturb the normal bacteria in the gut. Intestinal obstruction. Complications of intestinal or abdominal surgery. Complications of cancer treatments such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Frequent bowel movement treatment Treatment for frequent bowel movements depends on dealing with the cause, such as treating a worm infection if it is the cause, or taking treatments for an irritable colon if it is the cause.  Constipation Moving on to constipation, which is generally defined as less than 3 bowel movements per week.  Constipation affects most people from time to time and can vary from being infrequent to a long-term chronic condition.  Constipation symptoms Signs of constipation include passing stools infrequently, and passing hard stools, which can include straining.  Constipation can cause problems if it leads to:  Bloating; Stomach pain. Discomfort or difficulty defecation. Causes of constipation There are a number of potential causes of constipation, and a common cause is a change in diet, especially in terms of reducing insoluble fiber intake.  Other reasons may include:  Lack of hydration Celiac disease. Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Rectal colon cancer. Certain medications. Medications that may lead to constipation include antidepressants, water tablets, and calcium or iron supplements. It is common for women in the early stages of pregnancy to experience constipation. Prevention of constipation Intestinal constipation  Constipation treatment with diet Constipation can be relieved by changing the diet . The UK's National Health Service (NHS) notes that many people in the UK don't eat enough fibre. It is recommended to eat between 18 and 30 grams of fiber per day.  Insoluble fiber - found in whole grains, vegetables and fruits - is especially recommended to help move food through the intestines.  The National Health Service recommends adding a source of wheat bran to your diet to help make stool easier. However, this is not recommended for people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity or intolerance.  Staying hydrated will help keep stools soft.  Medication treatment for constipation Taking laxatives may help relieve constipation. There are different types of laxatives available, including bulk-forming laxatives, which help you retain water in your stools, osmotic laxatives, which increase the amount of fluid in your intestines, and stimulant laxatives, which stimulate a bowel movement.  Constipation and diabetes There are several causes associated with diabetes that may increase the likelihood of developing constipation. People who follow a diet that restricts wheat products may experience constipation. This can be mitigated by increasing the amount of vegetables you eat and staying hydrated.  Higher than normal blood glucose levels can reduce hydration, which can reduce water availability in the intestines, leading to constipation.

A recent study found that the frequency of bowel movement (the number of times one goes to the bathroom to defecate daily) may indicate the risk of diabetes and heart disease, so what is the ideal rate of entering the bathroom that is associated with the lowest risk of these diseases?

The study was conducted by Chinese scientists, and was published in the journal " BMJ Open", and the website "diabetes.co.uk" wrote about it.

Causes of Constipation Intestines Stomach Dietary Fibers Digestive System Infographic

The number of defecation times per day
Using data from China Kadoorie Biobank, the researchers enrolled 487,198 participants between the ages of 30 and 79 in the study.

The initial baseline survey was conducted from 2004 to 2008, with follow-up starting thereafter and continuing for an average of 10 years.

The frequency of bowel movements (the number of bowel movements per day) was assessed with participants answering the question "How often do you have a bowel movement each week?" The four responses available were: more than once a day, once a day, once every 2-3 days, or less than 3 times a week.

The number of times to enter the bathroom
After an average follow-up of 10.1 years, the researchers found the following findings on bathroom frequency:

Going to the bathroom more than once a day
Researchers found a higher risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD), heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), type 2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in participants who reported going. For the bathroom to defecate more than once a day, compared to the group that went once a day.

Going to the bathroom less than 3 times a week
The researchers found that participants who reported fewer than 3 bowel movements per week - meaning they were constipated - had an increased risk of ischemic heart disease, " major coronary events", stroke and chronic kidney disease.

Major coronary events are defined as myocardial infarction, ischemic heart failure, "unstable angina" or sudden death.

Therefore, the findings suggest that reduced bowel movements may carry an increased risk of heart attack.

"Based on findings from current and previous studies, people with 'abnormal bowel movement frequency' should consider the possibility of developing undiagnosed disease and be aware of potential future risks of various health conditions," the researchers add.

The normal rate of going to the bathroom per day
We must stress here that these results are from a study, which means that it is not possible to base them on a scientific definition of the number of times entering the bathroom.

However, based on this study alone, it can be said that "it appears that the normal rate of defecation is about once a day", which does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of diabetes and heart disease. However, this is a general conclusion, and you may be exposed to these diseases even if you only go to the bathroom once a day. Always consult a doctor, and ask him if you feel a change in your bowel movement, increase or decrease, or if your stool is very loose or hard.

Bowel movement
Moving on from the study, to talk more about bowel movement, which we will divide into two parts:

Frequent bowel movements
It is a condition in which a person defecates more than usual. There is no "normal" number of bowel movements, and a "normal" person's pattern may differ from these numbers. Saying that bowel movements are becoming more frequent is based on an increase in that person's habitual pattern, not on a standard definition that applies to everyone, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

But in general, diarrhea can be defined as more than 3 times of defecation of loose stools per day.

What causes frequent bowel movements?
Some cases of frequent bowel movements last only a short time and are not a cause for concern. It can be caused by digestive upset from eating spoiled, fatty or spicy foods, or food that is intolerable.

Other possible causes of frequent bowel movements include increased physical exercise, certain medications such as antibiotics or metformin, or a change in diet (more fiber, water, fats or sugars). Bowel movements may return to normal after a person adjusts to these changes or makes adjustments to their diet.

There may be other causes of frequent bowel movement, including the following:

Bacterial infection;
C. difficile infection (which can be serious if left untreated).
Viral infection.
Parasitic infections such as worms or parasites.
Diverticulitis (small pockets along the wall of the colon that fill with stagnant stool and become inflamed).
Inflammatory bowel disease (a group of disorders, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, that cause irritation and swelling in the digestive system).
pancreatitis.
Celiac disease ( an autoimmune disease that causes sensitivity to gluten, a protein found in grains such as wheat, rye or barley).
Cancer of the colon or elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract.
Food allergy.
Gallbladder problems.
Lactose intolerance.
Irritable Bowel Syndrome.
Side effects of medications (including antacids, laxatives, and stool softeners).
Foods and drinks, including some herbs, herbal teas, and caffeine.
Use of antibiotics, which can disturb the normal bacteria in the gut.
Intestinal obstruction.
Complications of intestinal or abdominal surgery.
Complications of cancer treatments such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy.
Frequent bowel movement treatment
Treatment for frequent bowel movements depends on dealing with the cause, such as treating a worm infection if it is the cause, or taking treatments for an irritable colon if it is the cause.

Constipation
Moving on to constipation, which is generally defined as less than 3 bowel movements per week.

Constipation affects most people from time to time and can vary from being infrequent to a long-term chronic condition.

Constipation symptoms
Signs of constipation include passing stools infrequently, and passing hard stools, which can include straining.

Constipation can cause problems if it leads to:

Bloating;
Stomach pain.
Discomfort or difficulty defecation.
Causes of constipation
There are a number of potential causes of constipation, and a common cause is a change in diet, especially in terms of reducing insoluble fiber intake.

Other reasons may include:

Lack of hydration
Celiac disease.
Irritable Bowel Syndrome.
Rectal colon cancer.
Certain medications. Medications that may lead to constipation include antidepressants, water tablets, and calcium or iron supplements.
It is common for women in the early stages of pregnancy to experience constipation.
Prevention of constipation Intestinal constipation

Constipation treatment with diet
Constipation can be relieved by changing the diet . The UK's National Health Service (NHS) notes that many people in the UK don't eat enough fibre. It is recommended to eat between 18 and 30 grams of fiber per day.

Insoluble fiber - found in whole grains, vegetables and fruits - is especially recommended to help move food through the intestines.

The National Health Service recommends adding a source of wheat bran to your diet to help make stool easier. However, this is not recommended for people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity or intolerance.

Staying hydrated will help keep stools soft.

Medication treatment for constipation
Taking laxatives may help relieve constipation. There are different types of laxatives available, including bulk-forming laxatives, which help you retain water in your stools, osmotic laxatives, which increase the amount of fluid in your intestines, and stimulant laxatives, which stimulate a bowel movement.

Constipation and diabetes
There are several causes associated with diabetes that may increase the likelihood of developing constipation. People who follow a diet that restricts wheat products may experience constipation. This can be mitigated by increasing the amount of vegetables you eat and staying hydrated.

Higher than normal blood glucose levels can reduce hydration, which can reduce water availability in the intestines, leading to constipation.
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