Global research reveals which countries will be most affected by heat waves in the coming years

Global research reveals which countries will be most affected by heat waves in the coming years  A new study has highlighted the regions around the world that are most at risk and unprepared for the devastating effects of scorching temperatures.  Life-threatening heat waves are likely to sweep the world this century, amid fears of worsening climate change.  The new study, led by researchers from the University of Bristol and published in the journal Nature Communications , shows that unprecedented temperature extremes combined with social and economic vulnerability are putting certain regions, such as Afghanistan and Central America, more vulnerable.  Countries that have not yet experienced the most severe heatwaves are often particularly vulnerable, as adaptation measures are often introduced only after the event.  The high probability of record temperatures, a growing population, and limited health care and energy provision increase the risks.  Afghanistan, Papua New Guinea and Central America topped the list of countries most affected.  The study notes that these grim findings come in the wake of the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan, where its health system is now on the verge of collapse, according to the World Health Organization.  The study also showed that limited health care and preparations for climate change also played a large role in vulnerabilities in Papua New Guinea and Central America, such as Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama.  "Preparation saves lives," said Professor Dan Mitchell, Professor of Atmospheric Sciences at University of Bristol's Cabot Cabot Institute for the Environment, who co-authored the study. "We've seen some of the most unexpected heatwaves around the world lead to heat-related deaths in the tens of thousands." "We have shown that such record-breaking events can happen anywhere. Governments around the world need to be prepared."  The experts found that "statistically implausible cases of radicalization" occurred in 31% of the regions analyzed between 1959 and 2021.  This temperature anomaly had no clear pattern, raising concerns that radicalization "could happen anywhere, at any time".  Experts point out that countries that have been fortunate enough to avoid the worst extremism so far are most at risk in the future, due to a lack of past protections.  China's Beijing, Hebei and Tianjin provinces have been designated as areas of concern, as well as the Khabarovsk region in eastern Russia.  However, the analysis of African countries, North Korea, and a few other countries was limited by the lack of available and usable data.  Experts also acknowledge that climate patterns can vary within the listed risk countries based on local extremes and weather patterns.  Lead author of the study, Dr Vicki Thompson, a climate scientist at the University of Bristol's Cabot Cabot Institute for the Environment, explained: 'As heatwaves become more frequent, we need to prepare better. "Developing countries, some of which are already very hot. We need to ask if the heat action plans for these regions are sufficient."

A new study has highlighted the regions around the world that are most at risk and unprepared for the devastating effects of scorching temperatures.

Life-threatening heat waves are likely to sweep the world this century, amid fears of worsening climate change.

The new study, led by researchers from the University of Bristol and published in the journal Nature Communications , shows that unprecedented temperature extremes combined with social and economic vulnerability are putting certain regions, such as Afghanistan and Central America, more vulnerable.

Countries that have not yet experienced the most severe heatwaves are often particularly vulnerable, as adaptation measures are often introduced only after the event.

The high probability of record temperatures, a growing population, and limited health care and energy provision increase the risks.

Afghanistan, Papua New Guinea and Central America topped the list of countries most affected.

The study notes that these grim findings come in the wake of the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan, where its health system is now on the verge of collapse, according to the World Health Organization.

The study also showed that limited health care and preparations for climate change also played a large role in vulnerabilities in Papua New Guinea and Central America, such as Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama.

"Preparation saves lives," said Professor Dan Mitchell, Professor of Atmospheric Sciences at University of Bristol's Cabot Cabot Institute for the Environment, who co-authored the study. "We've seen some of the most unexpected heatwaves around the world lead to heat-related deaths in the tens of thousands." "We have shown that such record-breaking events can happen anywhere. Governments around the world need to be prepared."

The experts found that "statistically implausible cases of radicalization" occurred in 31% of the regions analyzed between 1959 and 2021.

This temperature anomaly had no clear pattern, raising concerns that radicalization "could happen anywhere, at any time".

Experts point out that countries that have been fortunate enough to avoid the worst extremism so far are most at risk in the future, due to a lack of past protections.

China's Beijing, Hebei and Tianjin provinces have been designated as areas of concern, as well as the Khabarovsk region in eastern Russia.

However, the analysis of African countries, North Korea, and a few other countries was limited by the lack of available and usable data.

Experts also acknowledge that climate patterns can vary within the listed risk countries based on local extremes and weather patterns.

Lead author of the study, Dr Vicki Thompson, a climate scientist at the University of Bristol's Cabot Cabot Institute for the Environment, explained: 'As heatwaves become more frequent, we need to prepare better. "Developing countries, some of which are already very hot. We need to ask if the heat action plans for these regions are sufficient."
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