State Duma deputies propose a guaranteed rating created by artificial intelligence State Duma deputies propose a guaranteed rating created by artificial intelligence

State Duma deputies propose a guaranteed rating created by artificial intelligence

State Duma deputies propose a guaranteed rating created by artificial intelligence  Recently, more and more content created using artificial intelligence has begun to appear on the Internet.  Since this content can harm anyone, it is worth categorizing it (giving it its place in a list). This was reported by the "Linta.ru" website, on behalf of Andrei Sventsov, deputy chairman of the Information Policy Committee in the Russian State Duma (parliament).  Senator Alexander Shenderyuk-Zhidkov expressed a similar view, adding that such an initiative to classify content made with the help of artificial intelligence is the only way to combat the spread of false information.  At the same time, the aim of these proposals is not to demonize AI, but on the contrary, to try to integrate it into a variety of industries.  And the Russian online portal Life.ru said that within the next 3-5 years, artificial intelligence will be integrated into social networks, as it will immediately withdraw counterfeit products from circulation, search for prohibited content and speed up the process of blocking it.  On the other hand, its capabilities will be very wide, as it will be used to analyze speech from various video clips to inform users of it in the event of false information.          Scientists make a machine out of Lego that can grow human skin!  It is not always easy to obtain samples of human tissue for biological investigations, although they can be obtained through organ donation or from surgically removed tissue.  And this is not only because there is a limited amount of human tissue samples. There is also limited availability of the exact size and type of tissue samples needed for the many projects being conducted at any one time.  That is why Sean Coleman, Senior Lecturer in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chris Thomas, Senior Lecturer and Director of Research in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Oliver Castell, Senior Lecturer in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, decided to tackle the problem by Building a low-cost, easily accessible printer capable of creating human tissue samples using one of the world's most popular toys.  The advent of 3D bioprinting provided a potential solution to the difficulty in obtaining tissue samples. This technology involves loading a 'bio-ink', which contains living cells, into a cartridge.  This, in turn, is loaded into the dynamic printer. Once programmed, the bioprinter prints bio-ink loaded with cells to form 3D structures meant to replicate the intricate configuration of biological tissues.  Unlike two-dimensional cell cultures grown on plates, bioprinters enable scientists to grow cells in three dimensions. This better replicates the complex geometry of human biology. In other words, bioprinting technology allows researchers to create more amenable models for comparative study of healthy and diseased tissues. The problem is that these machines come at a very high cost of tens or even hundreds of thousands of pounds. Few research teams can stretch their budgets to cover this kind of spending, no matter how groundbreaking the technology promises.  This prompted the researchers to ask themselves if they could build an affordable 3D bioprinter. And the answer was "yes" and I decided to do it with Lego.  Anyone who has ever tinkered with them will know that Lego is not only extremely cheap and versatile, but it is also made with a very high precision from standard parts that are universally accessible.  The researchers also learned that Lego has already been used to create traditional 3D printers. What remains uncertain, however, is whether we can take the basic idea of ​​a Lego 3D printer — which prints rigid 3D structures out of plastic — and engineer one that can print soft biological materials.  The output must be accurate, reliable, and stable in order to be useful in the laboratory.  The researchers set to work on a high-spec, affordable bioprinter in a corner of the Cardiff lab using standard Lego bricks, its mechanical sub-brand, Lego Mindstorms and a laboratory pump, a device commonly found in research laboratories. A multidisciplinary team of engineers and biologists worked together to design, engineer, build and program the bioprinter.  Still in its infancy, the bioprinter, which costs £500 ($624), still achieves the level of accuracy required to produce accurate biological material.   The nozzle ejects a gel-like substance full of cells onto a plate. At the heart of the device is a Lego Mindstorms minicomputer. This device moves the plate back and forth and from side to side while moving the nozzle up and down mechanically as it extrudes the gel full of cells.  These programmable movements build layers of cells to replicate the three-dimensional structure of human tissue, layer by layer.  Our bioprinter is now being used to create layers of skin cells, working towards a large-scale skin model. It can also be modified by using different types of nozzles to print different types of cells, building a variety of complexities into tissue samples. It is an exciting opportunity to simulate both healthy and diseased skin, look at existing treatments and design new therapies to treat different skin conditions.  Not only can the bioprinter provide us with an accurate, representative model of human skin, but it can also be used to add diseased cells to the healthy models we produce. This will make it possible to study how skin diseases develop and how healthy and diseased cells interact.   She provided details on how to build the Lego 3D bioprinter, giving clear instructions on how to rebuild this device in any lab, anywhere in the world. At a time when research funding is very limited, it offers an open-source, accessible, and affordable alternative to a vital piece of equipment that exceeds most researchers' budgets.

Recently, more and more content created using artificial intelligence has begun to appear on the Internet.

Since this content can harm anyone, it is worth categorizing it (giving it its place in a list). This was reported by the "Linta.ru" website, on behalf of Andrei Sventsov, deputy chairman of the Information Policy Committee in the Russian State Duma (parliament).

Senator Alexander Shenderyuk-Zhidkov expressed a similar view, adding that such an initiative to classify content made with the help of artificial intelligence is the only way to combat the spread of false information.

At the same time, the aim of these proposals is not to demonize AI, but on the contrary, to try to integrate it into a variety of industries.

And the Russian online portal Life.ru said that within the next 3-5 years, artificial intelligence will be integrated into social networks, as it will immediately withdraw counterfeit products from circulation, search for prohibited content and speed up the process of blocking it.

On the other hand, its capabilities will be very wide, as it will be used to analyze speech from various video clips to inform users of it in the event of false information.


State Duma deputies propose a guaranteed rating created by artificial intelligence  Recently, more and more content created using artificial intelligence has begun to appear on the Internet.  Since this content can harm anyone, it is worth categorizing it (giving it its place in a list). This was reported by the "Linta.ru" website, on behalf of Andrei Sventsov, deputy chairman of the Information Policy Committee in the Russian State Duma (parliament).  Senator Alexander Shenderyuk-Zhidkov expressed a similar view, adding that such an initiative to classify content made with the help of artificial intelligence is the only way to combat the spread of false information.  At the same time, the aim of these proposals is not to demonize AI, but on the contrary, to try to integrate it into a variety of industries.  And the Russian online portal Life.ru said that within the next 3-5 years, artificial intelligence will be integrated into social networks, as it will immediately withdraw counterfeit products from circulation, search for prohibited content and speed up the process of blocking it.  On the other hand, its capabilities will be very wide, as it will be used to analyze speech from various video clips to inform users of it in the event of false information.          Scientists make a machine out of Lego that can grow human skin!  It is not always easy to obtain samples of human tissue for biological investigations, although they can be obtained through organ donation or from surgically removed tissue.  And this is not only because there is a limited amount of human tissue samples. There is also limited availability of the exact size and type of tissue samples needed for the many projects being conducted at any one time.  That is why Sean Coleman, Senior Lecturer in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chris Thomas, Senior Lecturer and Director of Research in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Oliver Castell, Senior Lecturer in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, decided to tackle the problem by Building a low-cost, easily accessible printer capable of creating human tissue samples using one of the world's most popular toys.  The advent of 3D bioprinting provided a potential solution to the difficulty in obtaining tissue samples. This technology involves loading a 'bio-ink', which contains living cells, into a cartridge.  This, in turn, is loaded into the dynamic printer. Once programmed, the bioprinter prints bio-ink loaded with cells to form 3D structures meant to replicate the intricate configuration of biological tissues.  Unlike two-dimensional cell cultures grown on plates, bioprinters enable scientists to grow cells in three dimensions. This better replicates the complex geometry of human biology. In other words, bioprinting technology allows researchers to create more amenable models for comparative study of healthy and diseased tissues. The problem is that these machines come at a very high cost of tens or even hundreds of thousands of pounds. Few research teams can stretch their budgets to cover this kind of spending, no matter how groundbreaking the technology promises.  This prompted the researchers to ask themselves if they could build an affordable 3D bioprinter. And the answer was "yes" and I decided to do it with Lego.  Anyone who has ever tinkered with them will know that Lego is not only extremely cheap and versatile, but it is also made with a very high precision from standard parts that are universally accessible.  The researchers also learned that Lego has already been used to create traditional 3D printers. What remains uncertain, however, is whether we can take the basic idea of ​​a Lego 3D printer — which prints rigid 3D structures out of plastic — and engineer one that can print soft biological materials.  The output must be accurate, reliable, and stable in order to be useful in the laboratory.  The researchers set to work on a high-spec, affordable bioprinter in a corner of the Cardiff lab using standard Lego bricks, its mechanical sub-brand, Lego Mindstorms and a laboratory pump, a device commonly found in research laboratories. A multidisciplinary team of engineers and biologists worked together to design, engineer, build and program the bioprinter.  Still in its infancy, the bioprinter, which costs £500 ($624), still achieves the level of accuracy required to produce accurate biological material.   The nozzle ejects a gel-like substance full of cells onto a plate. At the heart of the device is a Lego Mindstorms minicomputer. This device moves the plate back and forth and from side to side while moving the nozzle up and down mechanically as it extrudes the gel full of cells.  These programmable movements build layers of cells to replicate the three-dimensional structure of human tissue, layer by layer.  Our bioprinter is now being used to create layers of skin cells, working towards a large-scale skin model. It can also be modified by using different types of nozzles to print different types of cells, building a variety of complexities into tissue samples. It is an exciting opportunity to simulate both healthy and diseased skin, look at existing treatments and design new therapies to treat different skin conditions.  Not only can the bioprinter provide us with an accurate, representative model of human skin, but it can also be used to add diseased cells to the healthy models we produce. This will make it possible to study how skin diseases develop and how healthy and diseased cells interact.   She provided details on how to build the Lego 3D bioprinter, giving clear instructions on how to rebuild this device in any lab, anywhere in the world. At a time when research funding is very limited, it offers an open-source, accessible, and affordable alternative to a vital piece of equipment that exceeds most researchers' budgets.

Scientists make a machine out of Lego that can grow human skin!

It is not always easy to obtain samples of human tissue for biological investigations, although they can be obtained through organ donation or from surgically removed tissue.

And this is not only because there is a limited amount of human tissue samples. There is also limited availability of the exact size and type of tissue samples needed for the many projects being conducted at any one time.

That is why Sean Coleman, Senior Lecturer in the College of  Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chris Thomas, Senior Lecturer and Director of Research in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Oliver Castell, Senior Lecturer in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, decided to tackle the problem by Building a low-cost, easily accessible printer capable of creating human tissue samples using one of the world's most popular toys.

The advent of 3D bioprinting provided a potential solution to the difficulty in obtaining tissue samples. This technology involves loading a 'bio-ink', which contains living cells, into a cartridge.

This, in turn, is loaded into the dynamic printer. Once programmed, the bioprinter prints bio-ink loaded with cells to form 3D structures meant to replicate the intricate configuration of biological tissues.

Unlike two-dimensional cell cultures grown on plates, bioprinters enable scientists to grow cells in three dimensions. This better replicates the complex geometry of human biology. In other words, bioprinting technology allows researchers to create more amenable models for comparative study of healthy and diseased tissues. The problem is that these machines come at a very high cost of tens or even hundreds of thousands of pounds. Few research teams can stretch their budgets to cover this kind of spending, no matter how groundbreaking the technology promises.

This prompted the researchers to ask themselves if they could build an affordable 3D bioprinter. And the answer was "yes" and I decided to do it with Lego.

Anyone who has ever tinkered with them will know that Lego is not only extremely cheap and versatile, but it is also made with a very high precision from standard parts that are universally accessible.

The researchers also learned that Lego has already been used to create traditional 3D printers. What remains uncertain, however, is whether we can take the basic idea of ​​a Lego 3D printer — which prints rigid 3D structures out of plastic — and engineer one that can print soft biological materials.

The output must be accurate, reliable, and stable in order to be useful in the laboratory.

The researchers set to work on a high-spec, affordable bioprinter in a corner of the Cardiff lab using standard Lego bricks, its mechanical sub-brand, Lego Mindstorms and a laboratory pump, a device commonly found in research laboratories. A multidisciplinary team of engineers and biologists worked together to design, engineer, build and program the bioprinter.

Still in its infancy, the bioprinter, which costs £500 ($624), still achieves the level of accuracy required to produce accurate biological material. 

The nozzle ejects a gel-like substance full of cells onto a plate. At the heart of the device is a Lego Mindstorms minicomputer. This device moves the plate back and forth and from side to side while moving the nozzle up and down mechanically as it extrudes the gel full of cells.

These programmable movements build layers of cells to replicate the three-dimensional structure of human tissue, layer by layer.

Our bioprinter is now being used to create layers of skin cells, working towards a large-scale skin model. It can also be modified by using different types of nozzles to print different types of cells, building a variety of complexities into tissue samples. It is an exciting opportunity to simulate both healthy and diseased skin, look at existing treatments and design new therapies to treat different skin conditions.

Not only can the bioprinter provide us with an accurate, representative model of human skin, but it can also be used to add diseased cells to the healthy models we produce. This will make it possible to study how skin diseases develop and how healthy and diseased cells interact. 

She provided details on how to build the Lego 3D bioprinter, giving clear instructions on how to rebuild this device in any lab, anywhere in the world. At a time when research funding is very limited, it offers an open-source, accessible, and affordable alternative to a vital piece of equipment that exceeds most researchers' budgets.

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