Bloomberg report: The tech giant could replace employees with artificial intelligence! Bloomberg report: The tech giant could replace employees with artificial intelligence!

Bloomberg report: The tech giant could replace employees with artificial intelligence!

Bloomberg report: The tech giant could replace employees with artificial intelligence!  The International Corporation for Business Machines (IBM) expects to eliminate nearly 8,000 jobs in the coming years and replace them with artificial intelligence, CEO Arvind Krishna told Bloomberg.  In an interview published on Tuesday, Krishna said the company plans to slow or completely suspend hiring for back-office jobs such as human resources, noting that these non-customer-facing roles currently account for nearly 26,000 workers.  “I could easily see 30% of that being replaced by AI and automation over five years,” Krishna said, noting that AI-induced job cuts could affect about 7,800 workers.  An IBM spokesperson also told the news agency that the company does not currently intend to fire anyone who fills these roles, but noted that any vacancies due to attrition will not be re-filled.  In a comment emailed to Business Insider, another spokesperson for the tech giant also clarified that there is "no pause" for mass hiring.  The spokesperson added that the company is "very selective when filling jobs that do not directly affect our customers or technology," noting that IBM is still actively hiring thousands of jobs.  And in late March, a report published by the Goldman Sachs Economics Research team warned that recent developments in generative AI, such as the popular ChatGPT, could soon cause "significant disruption" to the job market.  The researchers suggested that up to 300 million workers worldwide could be replaced by AI and that two-thirds of jobs in the US and Europe are exposed to "some degree of AI automation". They also indicated that generative AI could be used to replace a quarter of current jobs.  "Despite great uncertainty about the potential of generative AI, its ability to create content that is indistinguishable from human-made output and to break down communication barriers between humans and machines reflects significant advances with potentially large macroeconomic impacts," Goldman Sachs said.  Earlier this year, a group of more than 1,100 AI researchers, tech luminaries, and other futurists, including Tesla CEO Elon Musk and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak, signed an open letter calling for "intelligence experiments" to stop. artificial giants" for six months.  The signatories warned that AI systems with "human competitive intelligence" could pose "serious risks to society and humanity" if they ever managed to escape the understanding and control of their creators.            A study reveals what is fueling the rise of online voice fraud!  Experts have warned that artificial intelligence technology is fueling an explosion in audio cloning scams.  Fraudsters can now imitate a victim's voice using just a three-second snippet of audio, often stolen from social media profiles.  It is then used to contact a friend or family member to convince them that they are in trouble and desperate for money.  One in four Britons says they or someone they know has been targeted by the scam, according to cybersecurity specialists McAfee.  It is accepted to believe that the majority of those affected admitted to having lost money as a result, with around a third of victims incurring more than £1,000.  A report by the company said that artificial intelligence had "truly changed the game for cybercriminals", with the tools to carry out the scam available for free online.  Experts, academics and presidents from across the tech industry are leading calls for tighter regulation of AI because they fear the sector is spiraling out of control.  McAfee's report on the 'synthetic imposter' said that cloning a person's voice has become a 'powerful tool in cybercriminals' arsenal' - and it's not hard to find victims.  A survey of more than 1,000 adults in the UK found that half of them shared their voice data online at least once a week on social media or voice notes.  The investigation revealed more than a dozen publicly available AI voice cloning tools on the Internet, many of which are free and require only a basic level of expertise to use.  In one case, just three seconds of audio was enough to produce an 85% match, while she had no problem repeating accents from around the world.  With everyone voting the spoken equivalent of a biometric fingerprint, 65% of respondents admitted they were unsure of their ability to identify the clone of the real thing.  And more than three in 10 said they would respond to a voicemail or voice message purporting to be from a friend or loved one in need of money - particularly if they thought it was from a partner, child or parent. The messages most likely to elicit a response are those claiming that the sender has been involved in a car accident, been robbed, lost their phone or wallet, or needed assistance while traveling abroad.  One in 12 people said they had been personally targeted by some type of AI voice scam, and another 16% said it had happened to someone they knew.  The cost of falling for the AI ​​voice scam can be significant, with 78% of people admitting they lost money to them.

The International Corporation for Business Machines (IBM) expects to eliminate nearly 8,000 jobs in the coming years and replace them with artificial intelligence, CEO Arvind Krishna told Bloomberg.

In an interview published on Tuesday, Krishna said the company plans to slow or completely suspend hiring for back-office jobs such as human resources, noting that these non-customer-facing roles currently account for nearly 26,000 workers.

“I could easily see 30% of that being replaced by AI and automation over five years,” Krishna said, noting that AI-induced job cuts could affect about 7,800 workers.

An IBM spokesperson also told the news agency that the company does not currently intend to fire anyone who fills these roles, but noted that any vacancies due to attrition will not be re-filled.

In a comment emailed to Business Insider, another spokesperson for the tech giant also clarified that there is "no pause" for mass hiring.

The spokesperson added that the company is "very selective when filling jobs that do not directly affect our customers or technology," noting that IBM is still actively hiring thousands of jobs.

And in late March, a report published by the Goldman Sachs Economics Research team warned that recent developments in generative AI, such as the popular ChatGPT, could soon cause "significant disruption" to the job market.

The researchers suggested that up to 300 million workers worldwide could be replaced by AI and that two-thirds of jobs in the US and Europe are exposed to "some degree of AI automation". They also indicated that generative AI could be used to replace a quarter of current jobs.

"Despite great uncertainty about the potential of generative AI, its ability to create content that is indistinguishable from human-made output and to break down communication barriers between humans and machines reflects significant advances with potentially large macroeconomic impacts," Goldman Sachs said.

Earlier this year, a group of more than 1,100 AI researchers, tech luminaries, and other futurists, including Tesla CEO Elon Musk and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak, signed an open letter calling for "intelligence experiments" to stop. artificial giants" for six months.

The signatories warned that AI systems with "human competitive intelligence" could pose "serious risks to society and humanity" if they ever managed to escape the understanding and control of their creators.


The Wall Street Journal: Google plans to develop its own search engine with artificial intelligence

The Wall Street Journal reported that Google intends to make its search engine "more lively, easier to use, more private, and more humane." The report stated that Google will change the traditional format for presenting search results known as the "ten blue links".

The Wall Street Journal reported Saturday, quoting documents, that Google intends to develop its search engine to become "more lively, easier to use, more private, and more human," with a focus on serving young people around the world.

The move comes as artificial intelligence applications such as GBT Chat are rapidly gaining popularity, highlighting a technology that may completely change the way companies work and the lives of communities.

The report stated that the tech giant will change a traditional format for presenting search results known as the "ten blue links," with plans to incorporate more human voices as part of the transformation.

The Wall Street Journal quoted informed sources as saying that Google is expected to launch during an annual developer conference this week new features that allow users to hold conversations with an artificial intelligence program called (Maggie).



A study reveals what is fueling the rise of online voice fraud!

Experts have warned that artificial intelligence technology is fueling an explosion in audio cloning scams.

Fraudsters can now imitate a victim's voice using just a three-second snippet of audio, often stolen from social media profiles.

It is then used to contact a friend or family member to convince them that they are in trouble and desperate for money.

One in four Britons says they or someone they know has been targeted by the scam, according to cybersecurity specialists McAfee.

It is accepted to believe that the majority of those affected admitted to having lost money as a result, with around a third of victims incurring more than £1,000.

A report by the company said that artificial intelligence had "truly changed the game for cybercriminals", with the tools to carry out the scam available for free online.

Experts, academics and presidents from across the tech industry are leading calls for tighter regulation of AI because they fear the sector is spiraling out of control.

McAfee's report on the 'synthetic imposter' said that cloning a person's voice has become a 'powerful tool in cybercriminals' arsenal' - and it's not hard to find victims.

A survey of more than 1,000 adults in the UK found that half of them shared their voice data online at least once a week on social media or voice notes.

The investigation revealed more than a dozen publicly available AI voice cloning tools on the Internet, many of which are free and require only a basic level of expertise to use.

In one case, just three seconds of audio was enough to produce an 85% match, while she had no problem repeating accents from around the world.

With everyone voting the spoken equivalent of a biometric fingerprint, 65% of respondents admitted they were unsure of their ability to identify the clone of the real thing.

And more than three in 10 said they would respond to a voicemail or voice message purporting to be from a friend or loved one in need of money - particularly if they thought it was from a partner, child or parent. The messages most likely to elicit a response are those claiming that the sender has been involved in a car accident, been robbed, lost their phone or wallet, or needed assistance while traveling abroad.

One in 12 people said they had been personally targeted by some type of AI voice scam, and another 16% said it had happened to someone they knew.

The cost of falling for the AI ​​voice scam can be significant, with 78% of people admitting they lost money to them. 

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