Novosti : Scientists create a unique medical gun for suturing wounds Novosti : Scientists create a unique medical gun for suturing wounds

Novosti : Scientists create a unique medical gun for suturing wounds

                                                                                    Scientists from the Russian National Research Technological University unveiled the first miniature medical gun in Russia for suturing small and medium wounds, as well as for stopping bleeding.  And Russian specialists received a patent for this device. This was reported by the Russian agency "Novosti".  The new innovation creates favorable conditions for the rapid healing of wounds and prevents infection from entering them. The gun is portable and small in weight, and is placed in a small bag that can be easily carried by one person.  Russian scientists create a unique medical gun for suturing wounds  Scientists from the Russian National Research Technological University unveiled the first miniature medical gun in Russia for suturing small and medium wounds, as well as for stopping bleeding.  And Russian specialists received a patent for this device. This was reported by the Russian agency "Novosti".  The new innovation creates favorable conditions for the rapid healing of wounds and prevents infection from entering them. The gun is portable and small in weight, and is placed in a small bag that can be easily carried by one person.  Before starting work, two syringes with a capacity of 20 milliliters with biopolymers and medical preparations are installed in the medical gun, and a third syringe with a preparation that binds the wound is connected through a special port. When the trigger is pulled, the system combines all of these components, creating a prebiotic that speeds up tissue regeneration and stops bleeding.  The scientists put at the base of the healing material a hydrogel (hydraulic gel) made of natural polymers and gelatin. Antibiotics or anesthetics can also be added to them, and their ratios can be easily changed in real time. The body and parts of the gun were manufactured using 3D printing, but scientists say that there will be no 3D printing if the gun is industrially produced and sold in the market, and ordinary plastic will be used for this purpose.  Timur Aydemir, an engineer at the Center for Biomedical Engineering, pointed out that similar devices exist outside Russia, but the Russian version, unlike it, is completely independent.  The medical gun successfully passed a test on laboratory animals with burns at the Blokhin Cancer Center, where it was found that the wounds of the animals participating in the test healed faster compared to conventional treatments.        An evolution in optical microscopes using a strange quantum trick!  The resolution of light microscopes has been greatly enhanced thanks to the clever use of a common phenomenon in quantum physics.  By sending entangled light along different paths and recombining its waves, it is possible to look at tiny objects more closely than ever before, effectively doubling the resolution without the usual complication of dramatically increasing the power of light.  It is called "quantitative microscopy" by chance (QMC), and was developed by researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in the United States, who say it is particularly suitable for examining tissues and biomolecules to detect disease or to study its spread.  "The combination of improved speed, improved contrast-to-noise ratio, more robust stray light resistance, superior resolution, and low-intensity illumination enables QMC for dynamic imaging," the researchers wrote in their recently published paper.  Quantum entanglement describes the associations that exist between objects that have a shared history, before they are observed. And just as two store-bought shoes are linked to fit the right foot and the left foot, the particles can also be linked mathematically in a variety of ways. Only in a quantum system, things like shoes and electrons don't really settle into any of those states until they're observed. It's just possibilities best described as maybe a wave.  At QMC, the particles involved were photons, or particles of light, known as biphotons once entangled in a pair.  This was done through a special type of crystal made of beta barium borate (BBO). When laser light is shone through the crystal, a very small fraction of the photons — about one in a million — are converted into two photons. The researchers were then able to separate the biphotons again, through a network of mirrors, lenses and prisms.  One photon is sent through the material under study, while the other photon is analyzed. Being entangled, the correlations measured in either photon will also say something about its partner's flight. It is the basis for another fairly new technique called ghost photography.  However, this intertwined double-action has another trick up its sleeve. Pivotons have twice the momentum of photons, which also means that their wavelengths are halved. Half the wavelength of light, in turn, means higher resolution for the light microscope.  Light with shorter wavelengths usually carries more energy, which can damage the cells under study at a certain point. Think of the difference between harmless UVA rays versus the stronger, stronger UVB rays that can break DNA and cause sunburn.  In this case, while entanglement cuts the wavelength in half, it does not increase the energy of the individual photons.  "Cells don't like UV light. But if we can use 400 nanometer light to image the cell and achieve the effect of 200 nanometers of light, which is UV light, we will have ultraviolet resolution," says Lihong Wang, a medical engineer from Caltech. violet".  There is room for improvement in this system as well, including faster imaging and the ability to entangle more photons together, further increasing resolution. However, adding more photons means that the probability of entanglement - one in a million, really - will drop even further.  Because entanglement is easily disrupted by interactions with the environment, increasing the number of photons in a system increases the likelihood that individual photons will interact with the environment rather than with each other.  While biphoton imaging has been tried before, the researchers behind the new setup have made several improvements throughout the process, and tested it in practice - making it one of the most promising technologies of its kind.  The research has been published in the journal Nature Communications.        A Russian company unveils a giant, ultra-powerful atmospheric engine  At the MAKS-2023 aerospace exhibition, the Russian State Corporation Rostec will unveil a gas generator for Russia's first high-powered BD-35 atmospheric engine.  This was stated by Alexander Inozimtsev, Deputy General Director of Permsky Motor Company and Chief Designer of ODC Avia Defigatel.  The chief designer said his product is a gigantic engine whose propeller diameter is only 3.1 meters.  The company's press service recalled that a team of engineers led by Alexander Inozimtsev had previously designed and produced the "BD-14" engine for the "MS-21" civilian passenger plane. It is the first Russian engine designed and built from scratch. It is successfully used by the MS-21, Sukhoi and other civil and military aircraft.  As for the "BD-35", which has a thrust of 35 tons, it is a project for a Russian two-stage super-powerful turboprop engine that will be used in wide-body, long-range passenger aircraft and military transport aircraft.  The thrust of the engine when the plane takes off is about 33-40 tons. The Russian government has invested an amount of 44 billion rubles for the development of this project. As for the total volume of investments in the project, it will amount to 180 billion rubles.  It is noteworthy that, on May 1, Russian President Vladimir Putin honored the chief designer of the "ODK Avia Dvigatel" company, Alexander Inozimtsev, by awarding him the title of "Hero of Labor in Russia."  Before starting work, two syringes with a capacity of 20 milliliters with biopolymers and medical preparations are installed in the medical gun, and a third syringe with a preparation that binds the wound is connected through a special port. When the trigger is pulled, the system combines all of these components, creating a prebiotic that speeds up tissue regeneration and stops bleeding.  The scientists put at the base of the healing material a hydrogel (hydraulic gel) made of natural polymers and gelatin. Antibiotics or anesthetics can also be added to them, and their ratios can be easily changed in real time. The body and parts of the gun were manufactured using 3D printing, but scientists say that there will be no 3D printing if the gun is industrially produced and sold in the market, and ordinary plastic will be used for this purpose.  Timur Aydemir, an engineer at the Center for Biomedical Engineering, pointed out that similar devices exist outside Russia, but the Russian version, unlike it, is completely independent.  The medical gun successfully passed a test on laboratory animals with burns at the Blokhin Cancer Center, where it was found that the wounds of the animals participating in the test healed faster compared to conventional treatments.        An evolution in optical microscopes using a strange quantum trick : Caltech  The resolution of light microscopes has been greatly enhanced thanks to the clever use of a common phenomenon in quantum physics.  By sending entangled light along different paths and recombining its waves, it is possible to look at tiny objects more closely than ever before, effectively doubling the resolution without the usual complication of dramatically increasing the power of light.    It is called "quantitative microscopy" by chance (QMC), and was developed by researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in the United States, who say it is particularly suitable for examining tissues and biomolecules to detect disease or to study its spread.  "The combination of improved speed, improved contrast-to-noise ratio, more robust stray light resistance, superior resolution, and low-intensity illumination enables QMC for dynamic imaging," the researchers wrote in their recently published paper.  Quantum entanglement describes the associations that exist between objects that have a shared history, before they are observed. And just as two store-bought shoes are linked to fit the right foot and the left foot, the particles can also be linked mathematically in a variety of ways. Only in a quantum system, things like shoes and electrons don't really settle into any of those states until they're observed. It's just possibilities best described as maybe a wave.  At QMC, the particles involved were photons, or particles of light, known as biphotons once entangled in a pair.  This was done through a special type of crystal made of beta barium borate (BBO). When laser light is shone through the crystal, a very small fraction of the photons — about one in a million — are converted into two photons. The researchers were then able to separate the biphotons again, through a network of mirrors, lenses and prisms.  One photon is sent through the material under study, while the other photon is analyzed. Being entangled, the correlations measured in either photon will also say something about its partner's flight. It is the basis for another fairly new technique called ghost photography.  However, this intertwined double-action has another trick up its sleeve. Pivotons have twice the momentum of photons, which also means that their wavelengths are halved. Half the wavelength of light, in turn, means higher resolution for the light microscope.  Light with shorter wavelengths usually carries more energy, which can damage the cells under study at a certain point. Think of the difference between harmless UVA rays versus the stronger, stronger UVB rays that can break DNA and cause sunburn.  In this case, while entanglement cuts the wavelength in half, it does not increase the energy of the individual photons.  "Cells don't like UV light. But if we can use 400 nanometer light to image the cell and achieve the effect of 200 nanometers of light, which is UV light, we will have ultraviolet resolution," says Lihong Wang, a medical engineer from Caltech. violet".  There is room for improvement in this system as well, including faster imaging and the ability to entangle more photons together, further increasing resolution. However, adding more photons means that the probability of entanglement - one in a million, really - will drop even further.  Because entanglement is easily disrupted by interactions with the environment, increasing the number of photons in a system increases the likelihood that individual photons will interact with the environment rather than with each other.  While biphoton imaging has been tried before, the researchers behind the new setup have made several improvements throughout the process, and tested it in practice - making it one of the most promising technologies of its kind.  The research has been published in the journal Nature Communications.        A company unveils a giant, ultra-powerful atmospheric engine : Russian State Corporation Rostec  At the MAKS-2023 aerospace exhibition, the Russian State Corporation Rostec will unveil a gas generator for Russia's first high-powered BD-35 atmospheric engine.  This was stated by Alexander Inozimtsev, Deputy General Director of Permsky Motor Company and Chief Designer of ODC Avia Defigatel.  The chief designer said his product is a gigantic engine whose propeller diameter is only 3.1 meters.  The company's press service recalled that a team of engineers led by Alexander Inozimtsev had previously designed and produced the "BD-14" engine for the "MS-21" civilian passenger plane. It is the first Russian engine designed and built from scratch. It is successfully used by the MS-21, Sukhoi and other civil and military aircraft.  As for the "BD-35", which has a thrust of 35 tons, it is a project for a Russian two-stage super-powerful turboprop engine that will be used in wide-body, long-range passenger aircraft and military transport aircraft.  The thrust of the engine when the plane takes off is about 33-40 tons. The Russian government has invested an amount of 44 billion rubles for the development of this project. As for the total volume of investments in the project, it will amount to 180 billion rubles.  It is noteworthy that, on May 1, Russian President Vladimir Putin honored the chief designer of the "ODK Avia Dvigatel" company, Alexander Inozimtsev, by awarding him the title of "Hero of Labor in Russia."

 Scientists from the Russian National Research Technological University unveiled the first miniature medical gun in Russia for suturing small and medium wounds, as well as for stopping bleeding.


And Russian specialists received a patent for this device. This was reported by the Russian agency "Novosti".

The new innovation creates favorable conditions for the rapid healing of wounds and prevents infection from entering them. The gun is portable and small in weight, and is placed in a small bag that can be easily carried by one person.

Russian scientists create a unique medical gun for suturing wounds  Scientists from the Russian National Research Technological University unveiled the first miniature medical gun in Russia for suturing small and medium wounds, as well as for stopping bleeding.  And Russian specialists received a patent for this device. This was reported by the Russian agency "Novosti".  The new innovation creates favorable conditions for the rapid healing of wounds and prevents infection from entering them. The gun is portable and small in weight, and is placed in a small bag that can be easily carried by one person.  Before starting work, two syringes with a capacity of 20 milliliters with biopolymers and medical preparations are installed in the medical gun, and a third syringe with a preparation that binds the wound is connected through a special port. When the trigger is pulled, the system combines all of these components, creating a prebiotic that speeds up tissue regeneration and stops bleeding.  The scientists put at the base of the healing material a hydrogel (hydraulic gel) made of natural polymers and gelatin. Antibiotics or anesthetics can also be added to them, and their ratios can be easily changed in real time. The body and parts of the gun were manufactured using 3D printing, but scientists say that there will be no 3D printing if the gun is industrially produced and sold in the market, and ordinary plastic will be used for this purpose.  Timur Aydemir, an engineer at the Center for Biomedical Engineering, pointed out that similar devices exist outside Russia, but the Russian version, unlike it, is completely independent.  The medical gun successfully passed a test on laboratory animals with burns at the Blokhin Cancer Center, where it was found that the wounds of the animals participating in the test healed faster compared to conventional treatments.        An evolution in optical microscopes using a strange quantum trick!  The resolution of light microscopes has been greatly enhanced thanks to the clever use of a common phenomenon in quantum physics.  By sending entangled light along different paths and recombining its waves, it is possible to look at tiny objects more closely than ever before, effectively doubling the resolution without the usual complication of dramatically increasing the power of light.  It is called "quantitative microscopy" by chance (QMC), and was developed by researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in the United States, who say it is particularly suitable for examining tissues and biomolecules to detect disease or to study its spread.  "The combination of improved speed, improved contrast-to-noise ratio, more robust stray light resistance, superior resolution, and low-intensity illumination enables QMC for dynamic imaging," the researchers wrote in their recently published paper.  Quantum entanglement describes the associations that exist between objects that have a shared history, before they are observed. And just as two store-bought shoes are linked to fit the right foot and the left foot, the particles can also be linked mathematically in a variety of ways. Only in a quantum system, things like shoes and electrons don't really settle into any of those states until they're observed. It's just possibilities best described as maybe a wave.  At QMC, the particles involved were photons, or particles of light, known as biphotons once entangled in a pair.  This was done through a special type of crystal made of beta barium borate (BBO). When laser light is shone through the crystal, a very small fraction of the photons — about one in a million — are converted into two photons. The researchers were then able to separate the biphotons again, through a network of mirrors, lenses and prisms.  One photon is sent through the material under study, while the other photon is analyzed. Being entangled, the correlations measured in either photon will also say something about its partner's flight. It is the basis for another fairly new technique called ghost photography.  However, this intertwined double-action has another trick up its sleeve. Pivotons have twice the momentum of photons, which also means that their wavelengths are halved. Half the wavelength of light, in turn, means higher resolution for the light microscope.  Light with shorter wavelengths usually carries more energy, which can damage the cells under study at a certain point. Think of the difference between harmless UVA rays versus the stronger, stronger UVB rays that can break DNA and cause sunburn.  In this case, while entanglement cuts the wavelength in half, it does not increase the energy of the individual photons.  "Cells don't like UV light. But if we can use 400 nanometer light to image the cell and achieve the effect of 200 nanometers of light, which is UV light, we will have ultraviolet resolution," says Lihong Wang, a medical engineer from Caltech. violet".  There is room for improvement in this system as well, including faster imaging and the ability to entangle more photons together, further increasing resolution. However, adding more photons means that the probability of entanglement - one in a million, really - will drop even further.  Because entanglement is easily disrupted by interactions with the environment, increasing the number of photons in a system increases the likelihood that individual photons will interact with the environment rather than with each other.  While biphoton imaging has been tried before, the researchers behind the new setup have made several improvements throughout the process, and tested it in practice - making it one of the most promising technologies of its kind.  The research has been published in the journal Nature Communications.        A Russian company unveils a giant, ultra-powerful atmospheric engine  At the MAKS-2023 aerospace exhibition, the Russian State Corporation Rostec will unveil a gas generator for Russia's first high-powered BD-35 atmospheric engine.  This was stated by Alexander Inozimtsev, Deputy General Director of Permsky Motor Company and Chief Designer of ODC Avia Defigatel.  The chief designer said his product is a gigantic engine whose propeller diameter is only 3.1 meters.  The company's press service recalled that a team of engineers led by Alexander Inozimtsev had previously designed and produced the "BD-14" engine for the "MS-21" civilian passenger plane. It is the first Russian engine designed and built from scratch. It is successfully used by the MS-21, Sukhoi and other civil and military aircraft.  As for the "BD-35", which has a thrust of 35 tons, it is a project for a Russian two-stage super-powerful turboprop engine that will be used in wide-body, long-range passenger aircraft and military transport aircraft.  The thrust of the engine when the plane takes off is about 33-40 tons. The Russian government has invested an amount of 44 billion rubles for the development of this project. As for the total volume of investments in the project, it will amount to 180 billion rubles.  It is noteworthy that, on May 1, Russian President Vladimir Putin honored the chief designer of the "ODK Avia Dvigatel" company, Alexander Inozimtsev, by awarding him the title of "Hero of Labor in Russia."

Before starting work, two syringes with a capacity of 20 milliliters with biopolymers and medical preparations are installed in the medical gun, and a third syringe with a preparation that binds the wound is connected through a special port. When the trigger is pulled, the system combines all of these components, creating a prebiotic that speeds up tissue regeneration and stops bleeding.

The scientists put at the base of the healing material a hydrogel (hydraulic gel) made of natural polymers and gelatin. Antibiotics or anesthetics can also be added to them, and their ratios can be easily changed in real time. The body and parts of the gun were manufactured using 3D printing, but scientists say that there will be no 3D printing if the gun is industrially produced and sold in the market, and ordinary plastic will be used for this purpose.

Timur Aydemir, an engineer at the Center for Biomedical Engineering, pointed out that similar devices exist outside Russia, but the Russian version, unlike it, is completely independent.

The medical gun successfully passed a test on laboratory animals with burns at the Blokhin Cancer Center, where it was found that the wounds of the animals participating in the test healed faster compared to conventional treatments.


An evolution in optical microscopes using a strange quantum trick : Caltech

The resolution of light microscopes has been greatly enhanced thanks to the clever use of a common phenomenon in quantum physics.

By sending entangled light along different paths and recombining its waves, it is possible to look at tiny objects more closely than ever before, effectively doubling the resolution without the usual complication of dramatically increasing the power of light.


Scientists from the Russian National Research Technological University unveiled the first miniature medical gun in Russia for suturing small and medium wounds, as well as for stopping bleeding.  And Russian specialists received a patent for this device. This was reported by the Russian agency "Novosti".  The new innovation creates favorable conditions for the rapid healing of wounds and prevents infection from entering them. The gun is portable and small in weight, and is placed in a small bag that can be easily carried by one person.  Russian scientists create a unique medical gun for suturing wounds  Scientists from the Russian National Research Technological University unveiled the first miniature medical gun in Russia for suturing small and medium wounds, as well as for stopping bleeding.  And Russian specialists received a patent for this device. This was reported by the Russian agency "Novosti".  The new innovation creates favorable conditions for the rapid healing of wounds and prevents infection from entering them. The gun is portable and small in weight, and is placed in a small bag that can be easily carried by one person.  Before starting work, two syringes with a capacity of 20 milliliters with biopolymers and medical preparations are installed in the medical gun, and a third syringe with a preparation that binds the wound is connected through a special port. When the trigger is pulled, the system combines all of these components, creating a prebiotic that speeds up tissue regeneration and stops bleeding.  The scientists put at the base of the healing material a hydrogel (hydraulic gel) made of natural polymers and gelatin. Antibiotics or anesthetics can also be added to them, and their ratios can be easily changed in real time. The body and parts of the gun were manufactured using 3D printing, but scientists say that there will be no 3D printing if the gun is industrially produced and sold in the market, and ordinary plastic will be used for this purpose.  Timur Aydemir, an engineer at the Center for Biomedical Engineering, pointed out that similar devices exist outside Russia, but the Russian version, unlike it, is completely independent.  The medical gun successfully passed a test on laboratory animals with burns at the Blokhin Cancer Center, where it was found that the wounds of the animals participating in the test healed faster compared to conventional treatments.        An evolution in optical microscopes using a strange quantum trick!  The resolution of light microscopes has been greatly enhanced thanks to the clever use of a common phenomenon in quantum physics.  By sending entangled light along different paths and recombining its waves, it is possible to look at tiny objects more closely than ever before, effectively doubling the resolution without the usual complication of dramatically increasing the power of light.  It is called "quantitative microscopy" by chance (QMC), and was developed by researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in the United States, who say it is particularly suitable for examining tissues and biomolecules to detect disease or to study its spread.  "The combination of improved speed, improved contrast-to-noise ratio, more robust stray light resistance, superior resolution, and low-intensity illumination enables QMC for dynamic imaging," the researchers wrote in their recently published paper.  Quantum entanglement describes the associations that exist between objects that have a shared history, before they are observed. And just as two store-bought shoes are linked to fit the right foot and the left foot, the particles can also be linked mathematically in a variety of ways. Only in a quantum system, things like shoes and electrons don't really settle into any of those states until they're observed. It's just possibilities best described as maybe a wave.  At QMC, the particles involved were photons, or particles of light, known as biphotons once entangled in a pair.  This was done through a special type of crystal made of beta barium borate (BBO). When laser light is shone through the crystal, a very small fraction of the photons — about one in a million — are converted into two photons. The researchers were then able to separate the biphotons again, through a network of mirrors, lenses and prisms.  One photon is sent through the material under study, while the other photon is analyzed. Being entangled, the correlations measured in either photon will also say something about its partner's flight. It is the basis for another fairly new technique called ghost photography.  However, this intertwined double-action has another trick up its sleeve. Pivotons have twice the momentum of photons, which also means that their wavelengths are halved. Half the wavelength of light, in turn, means higher resolution for the light microscope.  Light with shorter wavelengths usually carries more energy, which can damage the cells under study at a certain point. Think of the difference between harmless UVA rays versus the stronger, stronger UVB rays that can break DNA and cause sunburn.  In this case, while entanglement cuts the wavelength in half, it does not increase the energy of the individual photons.  "Cells don't like UV light. But if we can use 400 nanometer light to image the cell and achieve the effect of 200 nanometers of light, which is UV light, we will have ultraviolet resolution," says Lihong Wang, a medical engineer from Caltech. violet".  There is room for improvement in this system as well, including faster imaging and the ability to entangle more photons together, further increasing resolution. However, adding more photons means that the probability of entanglement - one in a million, really - will drop even further.  Because entanglement is easily disrupted by interactions with the environment, increasing the number of photons in a system increases the likelihood that individual photons will interact with the environment rather than with each other.  While biphoton imaging has been tried before, the researchers behind the new setup have made several improvements throughout the process, and tested it in practice - making it one of the most promising technologies of its kind.  The research has been published in the journal Nature Communications.        A Russian company unveils a giant, ultra-powerful atmospheric engine  At the MAKS-2023 aerospace exhibition, the Russian State Corporation Rostec will unveil a gas generator for Russia's first high-powered BD-35 atmospheric engine.  This was stated by Alexander Inozimtsev, Deputy General Director of Permsky Motor Company and Chief Designer of ODC Avia Defigatel.  The chief designer said his product is a gigantic engine whose propeller diameter is only 3.1 meters.  The company's press service recalled that a team of engineers led by Alexander Inozimtsev had previously designed and produced the "BD-14" engine for the "MS-21" civilian passenger plane. It is the first Russian engine designed and built from scratch. It is successfully used by the MS-21, Sukhoi and other civil and military aircraft.  As for the "BD-35", which has a thrust of 35 tons, it is a project for a Russian two-stage super-powerful turboprop engine that will be used in wide-body, long-range passenger aircraft and military transport aircraft.  The thrust of the engine when the plane takes off is about 33-40 tons. The Russian government has invested an amount of 44 billion rubles for the development of this project. As for the total volume of investments in the project, it will amount to 180 billion rubles.  It is noteworthy that, on May 1, Russian President Vladimir Putin honored the chief designer of the "ODK Avia Dvigatel" company, Alexander Inozimtsev, by awarding him the title of "Hero of Labor in Russia."  Before starting work, two syringes with a capacity of 20 milliliters with biopolymers and medical preparations are installed in the medical gun, and a third syringe with a preparation that binds the wound is connected through a special port. When the trigger is pulled, the system combines all of these components, creating a prebiotic that speeds up tissue regeneration and stops bleeding.  The scientists put at the base of the healing material a hydrogel (hydraulic gel) made of natural polymers and gelatin. Antibiotics or anesthetics can also be added to them, and their ratios can be easily changed in real time. The body and parts of the gun were manufactured using 3D printing, but scientists say that there will be no 3D printing if the gun is industrially produced and sold in the market, and ordinary plastic will be used for this purpose.  Timur Aydemir, an engineer at the Center for Biomedical Engineering, pointed out that similar devices exist outside Russia, but the Russian version, unlike it, is completely independent.  The medical gun successfully passed a test on laboratory animals with burns at the Blokhin Cancer Center, where it was found that the wounds of the animals participating in the test healed faster compared to conventional treatments.        An evolution in optical microscopes using a strange quantum trick : Caltech  The resolution of light microscopes has been greatly enhanced thanks to the clever use of a common phenomenon in quantum physics.  By sending entangled light along different paths and recombining its waves, it is possible to look at tiny objects more closely than ever before, effectively doubling the resolution without the usual complication of dramatically increasing the power of light.    It is called "quantitative microscopy" by chance (QMC), and was developed by researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in the United States, who say it is particularly suitable for examining tissues and biomolecules to detect disease or to study its spread.  "The combination of improved speed, improved contrast-to-noise ratio, more robust stray light resistance, superior resolution, and low-intensity illumination enables QMC for dynamic imaging," the researchers wrote in their recently published paper.  Quantum entanglement describes the associations that exist between objects that have a shared history, before they are observed. And just as two store-bought shoes are linked to fit the right foot and the left foot, the particles can also be linked mathematically in a variety of ways. Only in a quantum system, things like shoes and electrons don't really settle into any of those states until they're observed. It's just possibilities best described as maybe a wave.  At QMC, the particles involved were photons, or particles of light, known as biphotons once entangled in a pair.  This was done through a special type of crystal made of beta barium borate (BBO). When laser light is shone through the crystal, a very small fraction of the photons — about one in a million — are converted into two photons. The researchers were then able to separate the biphotons again, through a network of mirrors, lenses and prisms.  One photon is sent through the material under study, while the other photon is analyzed. Being entangled, the correlations measured in either photon will also say something about its partner's flight. It is the basis for another fairly new technique called ghost photography.  However, this intertwined double-action has another trick up its sleeve. Pivotons have twice the momentum of photons, which also means that their wavelengths are halved. Half the wavelength of light, in turn, means higher resolution for the light microscope.  Light with shorter wavelengths usually carries more energy, which can damage the cells under study at a certain point. Think of the difference between harmless UVA rays versus the stronger, stronger UVB rays that can break DNA and cause sunburn.  In this case, while entanglement cuts the wavelength in half, it does not increase the energy of the individual photons.  "Cells don't like UV light. But if we can use 400 nanometer light to image the cell and achieve the effect of 200 nanometers of light, which is UV light, we will have ultraviolet resolution," says Lihong Wang, a medical engineer from Caltech. violet".  There is room for improvement in this system as well, including faster imaging and the ability to entangle more photons together, further increasing resolution. However, adding more photons means that the probability of entanglement - one in a million, really - will drop even further.  Because entanglement is easily disrupted by interactions with the environment, increasing the number of photons in a system increases the likelihood that individual photons will interact with the environment rather than with each other.  While biphoton imaging has been tried before, the researchers behind the new setup have made several improvements throughout the process, and tested it in practice - making it one of the most promising technologies of its kind.  The research has been published in the journal Nature Communications.        A company unveils a giant, ultra-powerful atmospheric engine : Russian State Corporation Rostec  At the MAKS-2023 aerospace exhibition, the Russian State Corporation Rostec will unveil a gas generator for Russia's first high-powered BD-35 atmospheric engine.  This was stated by Alexander Inozimtsev, Deputy General Director of Permsky Motor Company and Chief Designer of ODC Avia Defigatel.  The chief designer said his product is a gigantic engine whose propeller diameter is only 3.1 meters.  The company's press service recalled that a team of engineers led by Alexander Inozimtsev had previously designed and produced the "BD-14" engine for the "MS-21" civilian passenger plane. It is the first Russian engine designed and built from scratch. It is successfully used by the MS-21, Sukhoi and other civil and military aircraft.  As for the "BD-35", which has a thrust of 35 tons, it is a project for a Russian two-stage super-powerful turboprop engine that will be used in wide-body, long-range passenger aircraft and military transport aircraft.  The thrust of the engine when the plane takes off is about 33-40 tons. The Russian government has invested an amount of 44 billion rubles for the development of this project. As for the total volume of investments in the project, it will amount to 180 billion rubles.  It is noteworthy that, on May 1, Russian President Vladimir Putin honored the chief designer of the "ODK Avia Dvigatel" company, Alexander Inozimtsev, by awarding him the title of "Hero of Labor in Russia."

It is called "quantitative microscopy" by chance (QMC), and was developed by researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in the United States, who say it is particularly suitable for examining tissues and biomolecules to detect disease or to study its spread.

"The combination of improved speed, improved contrast-to-noise ratio, more robust stray light resistance, superior resolution, and low-intensity illumination enables QMC for dynamic imaging," the researchers wrote in their recently published paper.

Quantum entanglement describes the associations that exist between objects that have a shared history, before they are observed. And just as two store-bought shoes are linked to fit the right foot and the left foot, the particles can also be linked mathematically in a variety of ways. Only in a quantum system, things like shoes and electrons don't really settle into any of those states until they're observed. It's just possibilities best described as maybe a wave.

At QMC, the particles involved were photons, or particles of light, known as biphotons once entangled in a pair.

This was done through a special type of crystal made of beta barium borate (BBO). When laser light is shone through the crystal, a very small fraction of the photons — about one in a million — are converted into two photons. The researchers were then able to separate the biphotons again, through a network of mirrors, lenses and prisms.

One photon is sent through the material under study, while the other photon is analyzed. Being entangled, the correlations measured in either photon will also say something about its partner's flight. It is the basis for another fairly new technique called ghost photography.

However, this intertwined double-action has another trick up its sleeve. Pivotons have twice the momentum of photons, which also means that their wavelengths are halved. Half the wavelength of light, in turn, means higher resolution for the light microscope.

Light with shorter wavelengths usually carries more energy, which can damage the cells under study at a certain point. Think of the difference between harmless UVA rays versus the stronger, stronger UVB rays that can break DNA and cause sunburn.

In this case, while entanglement cuts the wavelength in half, it does not increase the energy of the individual photons.

"Cells don't like UV light. But if we can use 400 nanometer light to image the cell and achieve the effect of 200 nanometers of light, which is UV light, we will have ultraviolet resolution," says Lihong Wang, a medical engineer from Caltech. violet".

There is room for improvement in this system as well, including faster imaging and the ability to entangle more photons together, further increasing resolution. However, adding more photons means that the probability of entanglement - one in a million, really - will drop even further.

Because entanglement is easily disrupted by interactions with the environment, increasing the number of photons in a system increases the likelihood that individual photons will interact with the environment rather than with each other.

While biphoton imaging has been tried before, the researchers behind the new setup have made several improvements throughout the process, and tested it in practice - making it one of the most promising technologies of its kind.

The research has been published in the journal Nature Communications.



Scientists from the Russian National Research Technological University unveiled the first miniature medical gun in Russia for suturing small and medium wounds, as well as for stopping bleeding.  And Russian specialists received a patent for this device. This was reported by the Russian agency "Novosti".  The new innovation creates favorable conditions for the rapid healing of wounds and prevents infection from entering them. The gun is portable and small in weight, and is placed in a small bag that can be easily carried by one person.  Russian scientists create a unique medical gun for suturing wounds  Scientists from the Russian National Research Technological University unveiled the first miniature medical gun in Russia for suturing small and medium wounds, as well as for stopping bleeding.  And Russian specialists received a patent for this device. This was reported by the Russian agency "Novosti".  The new innovation creates favorable conditions for the rapid healing of wounds and prevents infection from entering them. The gun is portable and small in weight, and is placed in a small bag that can be easily carried by one person.  Before starting work, two syringes with a capacity of 20 milliliters with biopolymers and medical preparations are installed in the medical gun, and a third syringe with a preparation that binds the wound is connected through a special port. When the trigger is pulled, the system combines all of these components, creating a prebiotic that speeds up tissue regeneration and stops bleeding.  The scientists put at the base of the healing material a hydrogel (hydraulic gel) made of natural polymers and gelatin. Antibiotics or anesthetics can also be added to them, and their ratios can be easily changed in real time. The body and parts of the gun were manufactured using 3D printing, but scientists say that there will be no 3D printing if the gun is industrially produced and sold in the market, and ordinary plastic will be used for this purpose.  Timur Aydemir, an engineer at the Center for Biomedical Engineering, pointed out that similar devices exist outside Russia, but the Russian version, unlike it, is completely independent.  The medical gun successfully passed a test on laboratory animals with burns at the Blokhin Cancer Center, where it was found that the wounds of the animals participating in the test healed faster compared to conventional treatments.        An evolution in optical microscopes using a strange quantum trick!  The resolution of light microscopes has been greatly enhanced thanks to the clever use of a common phenomenon in quantum physics.  By sending entangled light along different paths and recombining its waves, it is possible to look at tiny objects more closely than ever before, effectively doubling the resolution without the usual complication of dramatically increasing the power of light.  It is called "quantitative microscopy" by chance (QMC), and was developed by researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in the United States, who say it is particularly suitable for examining tissues and biomolecules to detect disease or to study its spread.  "The combination of improved speed, improved contrast-to-noise ratio, more robust stray light resistance, superior resolution, and low-intensity illumination enables QMC for dynamic imaging," the researchers wrote in their recently published paper.  Quantum entanglement describes the associations that exist between objects that have a shared history, before they are observed. And just as two store-bought shoes are linked to fit the right foot and the left foot, the particles can also be linked mathematically in a variety of ways. Only in a quantum system, things like shoes and electrons don't really settle into any of those states until they're observed. It's just possibilities best described as maybe a wave.  At QMC, the particles involved were photons, or particles of light, known as biphotons once entangled in a pair.  This was done through a special type of crystal made of beta barium borate (BBO). When laser light is shone through the crystal, a very small fraction of the photons — about one in a million — are converted into two photons. The researchers were then able to separate the biphotons again, through a network of mirrors, lenses and prisms.  One photon is sent through the material under study, while the other photon is analyzed. Being entangled, the correlations measured in either photon will also say something about its partner's flight. It is the basis for another fairly new technique called ghost photography.  However, this intertwined double-action has another trick up its sleeve. Pivotons have twice the momentum of photons, which also means that their wavelengths are halved. Half the wavelength of light, in turn, means higher resolution for the light microscope.  Light with shorter wavelengths usually carries more energy, which can damage the cells under study at a certain point. Think of the difference between harmless UVA rays versus the stronger, stronger UVB rays that can break DNA and cause sunburn.  In this case, while entanglement cuts the wavelength in half, it does not increase the energy of the individual photons.  "Cells don't like UV light. But if we can use 400 nanometer light to image the cell and achieve the effect of 200 nanometers of light, which is UV light, we will have ultraviolet resolution," says Lihong Wang, a medical engineer from Caltech. violet".  There is room for improvement in this system as well, including faster imaging and the ability to entangle more photons together, further increasing resolution. However, adding more photons means that the probability of entanglement - one in a million, really - will drop even further.  Because entanglement is easily disrupted by interactions with the environment, increasing the number of photons in a system increases the likelihood that individual photons will interact with the environment rather than with each other.  While biphoton imaging has been tried before, the researchers behind the new setup have made several improvements throughout the process, and tested it in practice - making it one of the most promising technologies of its kind.  The research has been published in the journal Nature Communications.        A Russian company unveils a giant, ultra-powerful atmospheric engine  At the MAKS-2023 aerospace exhibition, the Russian State Corporation Rostec will unveil a gas generator for Russia's first high-powered BD-35 atmospheric engine.  This was stated by Alexander Inozimtsev, Deputy General Director of Permsky Motor Company and Chief Designer of ODC Avia Defigatel.  The chief designer said his product is a gigantic engine whose propeller diameter is only 3.1 meters.  The company's press service recalled that a team of engineers led by Alexander Inozimtsev had previously designed and produced the "BD-14" engine for the "MS-21" civilian passenger plane. It is the first Russian engine designed and built from scratch. It is successfully used by the MS-21, Sukhoi and other civil and military aircraft.  As for the "BD-35", which has a thrust of 35 tons, it is a project for a Russian two-stage super-powerful turboprop engine that will be used in wide-body, long-range passenger aircraft and military transport aircraft.  The thrust of the engine when the plane takes off is about 33-40 tons. The Russian government has invested an amount of 44 billion rubles for the development of this project. As for the total volume of investments in the project, it will amount to 180 billion rubles.  It is noteworthy that, on May 1, Russian President Vladimir Putin honored the chief designer of the "ODK Avia Dvigatel" company, Alexander Inozimtsev, by awarding him the title of "Hero of Labor in Russia."  Before starting work, two syringes with a capacity of 20 milliliters with biopolymers and medical preparations are installed in the medical gun, and a third syringe with a preparation that binds the wound is connected through a special port. When the trigger is pulled, the system combines all of these components, creating a prebiotic that speeds up tissue regeneration and stops bleeding.  The scientists put at the base of the healing material a hydrogel (hydraulic gel) made of natural polymers and gelatin. Antibiotics or anesthetics can also be added to them, and their ratios can be easily changed in real time. The body and parts of the gun were manufactured using 3D printing, but scientists say that there will be no 3D printing if the gun is industrially produced and sold in the market, and ordinary plastic will be used for this purpose.  Timur Aydemir, an engineer at the Center for Biomedical Engineering, pointed out that similar devices exist outside Russia, but the Russian version, unlike it, is completely independent.  The medical gun successfully passed a test on laboratory animals with burns at the Blokhin Cancer Center, where it was found that the wounds of the animals participating in the test healed faster compared to conventional treatments.        An evolution in optical microscopes using a strange quantum trick : Caltech  The resolution of light microscopes has been greatly enhanced thanks to the clever use of a common phenomenon in quantum physics.  By sending entangled light along different paths and recombining its waves, it is possible to look at tiny objects more closely than ever before, effectively doubling the resolution without the usual complication of dramatically increasing the power of light.    It is called "quantitative microscopy" by chance (QMC), and was developed by researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in the United States, who say it is particularly suitable for examining tissues and biomolecules to detect disease or to study its spread.  "The combination of improved speed, improved contrast-to-noise ratio, more robust stray light resistance, superior resolution, and low-intensity illumination enables QMC for dynamic imaging," the researchers wrote in their recently published paper.  Quantum entanglement describes the associations that exist between objects that have a shared history, before they are observed. And just as two store-bought shoes are linked to fit the right foot and the left foot, the particles can also be linked mathematically in a variety of ways. Only in a quantum system, things like shoes and electrons don't really settle into any of those states until they're observed. It's just possibilities best described as maybe a wave.  At QMC, the particles involved were photons, or particles of light, known as biphotons once entangled in a pair.  This was done through a special type of crystal made of beta barium borate (BBO). When laser light is shone through the crystal, a very small fraction of the photons — about one in a million — are converted into two photons. The researchers were then able to separate the biphotons again, through a network of mirrors, lenses and prisms.  One photon is sent through the material under study, while the other photon is analyzed. Being entangled, the correlations measured in either photon will also say something about its partner's flight. It is the basis for another fairly new technique called ghost photography.  However, this intertwined double-action has another trick up its sleeve. Pivotons have twice the momentum of photons, which also means that their wavelengths are halved. Half the wavelength of light, in turn, means higher resolution for the light microscope.  Light with shorter wavelengths usually carries more energy, which can damage the cells under study at a certain point. Think of the difference between harmless UVA rays versus the stronger, stronger UVB rays that can break DNA and cause sunburn.  In this case, while entanglement cuts the wavelength in half, it does not increase the energy of the individual photons.  "Cells don't like UV light. But if we can use 400 nanometer light to image the cell and achieve the effect of 200 nanometers of light, which is UV light, we will have ultraviolet resolution," says Lihong Wang, a medical engineer from Caltech. violet".  There is room for improvement in this system as well, including faster imaging and the ability to entangle more photons together, further increasing resolution. However, adding more photons means that the probability of entanglement - one in a million, really - will drop even further.  Because entanglement is easily disrupted by interactions with the environment, increasing the number of photons in a system increases the likelihood that individual photons will interact with the environment rather than with each other.  While biphoton imaging has been tried before, the researchers behind the new setup have made several improvements throughout the process, and tested it in practice - making it one of the most promising technologies of its kind.  The research has been published in the journal Nature Communications.        A company unveils a giant, ultra-powerful atmospheric engine : Russian State Corporation Rostec  At the MAKS-2023 aerospace exhibition, the Russian State Corporation Rostec will unveil a gas generator for Russia's first high-powered BD-35 atmospheric engine.  This was stated by Alexander Inozimtsev, Deputy General Director of Permsky Motor Company and Chief Designer of ODC Avia Defigatel.  The chief designer said his product is a gigantic engine whose propeller diameter is only 3.1 meters.  The company's press service recalled that a team of engineers led by Alexander Inozimtsev had previously designed and produced the "BD-14" engine for the "MS-21" civilian passenger plane. It is the first Russian engine designed and built from scratch. It is successfully used by the MS-21, Sukhoi and other civil and military aircraft.  As for the "BD-35", which has a thrust of 35 tons, it is a project for a Russian two-stage super-powerful turboprop engine that will be used in wide-body, long-range passenger aircraft and military transport aircraft.  The thrust of the engine when the plane takes off is about 33-40 tons. The Russian government has invested an amount of 44 billion rubles for the development of this project. As for the total volume of investments in the project, it will amount to 180 billion rubles.  It is noteworthy that, on May 1, Russian President Vladimir Putin honored the chief designer of the "ODK Avia Dvigatel" company, Alexander Inozimtsev, by awarding him the title of "Hero of Labor in Russia."

A company unveils a giant, ultra-powerful atmospheric engine : Russian State Corporation Rostec

At the MAKS-2023 aerospace exhibition, the Russian State Corporation Rostec will unveil a gas generator for Russia's first high-powered BD-35 atmospheric engine.

This was stated by Alexander Inozimtsev, Deputy General Director of Permsky Motor Company and Chief Designer of ODC Avia Defigatel.

The chief designer said his product is a gigantic engine whose propeller diameter is only 3.1 meters.

The company's press service recalled that a team of engineers led by Alexander Inozimtsev had previously designed and produced the "BD-14" engine for the "MS-21" civilian passenger plane. It is the first Russian engine designed and built from scratch. It is successfully used by the MS-21, Sukhoi and other civil and military aircraft.

As for the "BD-35", which has a thrust of 35 tons, it is a project for a Russian two-stage super-powerful turboprop engine that will be used in wide-body, long-range passenger aircraft and military transport aircraft.

The thrust of the engine when the plane takes off is about 33-40 tons. The Russian government has invested an amount of 44 billion rubles for the development of this project. As for the total volume of investments in the project, it will amount to 180 billion rubles.

It is noteworthy that, on May 1, Russian President Vladimir Putin honored the chief designer of the "ODK Avia Dvigatel" company, Alexander Inozimtsev, by awarding him the title of "Hero of Labor in Russia."
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