Right-wing extremist Meli wins Argentina's presidency and pledges "the end of decadence"

Right-wing extremist Meli wins Argentina's presidency and pledges "the end of decadence"

Extremist liberal economist Javier Mele won the presidential elections in Argentina. He said in his “victory speech” that he had come to end the “poor class model,” adding: “Today the end of decadence begins” in the country, pledging to build “a new model of freedom.”

The extreme liberal economist, candidate of the Freedom Development Party, Javier Meli, won the presidential elections in Argentina, winning the support of 55.82% of voters, after 94% of the ballot boxes were counted.

Milley's rival, the current centrist Economy Minister Sergio Massa, received about 44.17% of the votes, according to preliminary results released Monday.

After the initial results were announced, Massa acknowledged his defeat in the electoral battle, and congratulated his competitor in a phone call.

Massa said in a press statement following the initial results that the results of the presidential elections were far from his expectations.

"The end of decadence"

Milley addressed thousands of his supporters at his campaign headquarters in Buenos Aires in his “victory speech” on Sunday evening, saying: “Today begins the end of decadence” and the “reconstruction of Argentina” begins.

He continued: "The poor class model has ended, and today we are adopting the model of freedom in order to once again become a global power. Today the way in which politics was practiced ends, and another way begins."

“We face enormous problems: inflation, recession, lack of real jobs, insecurity, poverty and misery,” the president-elect said. “These are problems that will not be solved unless we embrace the ideas of freedom again.”

Milley, who has been calling for shock therapy for two years for an economy exhausted by chronic inflation that currently stands at 143% over one year, warned: “There is no room for gradualism and no room for apathy or half-measures.”

He extended his hand to "all Argentines, political leaders and everyone who wants to join the new Argentina," but also warned of possible social resistance movements to his reforms.

He explained: "We know that people will resist and want to preserve the system of privileges, but it impoverishes the majority. I tell them: Everything that is in the law is permissible, but not what is outside the law."

An invitation to dialogue

For his part, Sergio Massa said: “I called Milley and congratulated him on the Argentines choosing him as president of the country for the next four years, and in the process I conveyed to him a message that the most important thing is to respect coexistence, dialogue and peace amid all these difficulties.”

He added: “As of tomorrow, full responsibility for political and economic performance rests with the elected president. Argentina confirmed today that it has a strong and solid democratic system that respects transparent results.”

According to official authorities, the participation rate in the vote that took place yesterday, Sunday, was 76%.

Milley will take over the presidency of Argentina on December 10 from current President Alberto Fernandez, and will continue to rule the country until 2027.



Nicknamed "Argentina's Trump" the new president embraces cooperation with America and Israel

The far-right Javier Mele won the presidency of Argentina. He holds a degree in economics and recently entered politics, but he sparked controversy with his positions in support of bearing arms and cooperation with the United States and Israel, while rejecting partnership with Brazil and China and BRICS membership.

A far-right extremist will sit in the Argentine presidency on December 10, succeeding President Alberto Fernandez (centre-left).

Far-right extremist and leader of the "Freedom Progress" party, Javier Milli, 53 years old, defines himself as an "anarcho-capitalist" economist. He recently entered politics after joining the Liberal Party in 2019, and became a member of the House of Representatives in 2021.

According to the British newspaper The Guardian, an unauthorized biography of Melly describes him as a “mercurial loner who suffered as a child from parental abuse and schoolyard bullying during the 1980s” and was nicknamed “El Loco” (the crazy man).

“More than Miley’s thoughts, what worries me is his mental state and emotional stability,” said Juan Luis Gonzalez, author of “Miley’s Biography.”

The new Argentine president, who holds a degree in economics, proposes radical changes in his country's economic policies and the social sphere.

The president, whose friends and enemies have often compared him to former British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, and former American and Brazilian presidents Donald Trump and Javier Bolesnaro, has pledged to find a solution to the economic crisis the country is witnessing, starting with “closing the central bank.”

He also promised to “dollarize the economy,” reduce spending, get rid of the “parasitic class,” and “prune the hostile state,” which was well received by voters despite the difficulty of these measures.

Analyzing his personality, as reported by international media, “Karina”, Milly’s sister, serves as his right hand and his closest confidant. He is married but has no children, and according to his previous statements, he did not communicate with his parents, who “treated him harshly during his childhood,” but they They attended his last appearance when he was a presidential candidate. He loves dogs very much and considers them “friends and children.”

Cooperation with America and Israel and dollarization of the economy

Politically, the new president intends to focus on cooperation with the United States and Israel, while disrupting the relationship with Argentina's main trading partners (China and Brazil), because he "does not want to deal with communists and socialists," and does not intend to work with Russia or participate in the BRICS grouping.

Milley, who has been calling for “shock therapy” for two years now for an economy exhausted by chronic inflation that currently stands at 143% over one year and poverty that has affected 40% of the population, warns: “There is no room for gradualism, no room for apathy or half-measures.”

He appeared at one of the events standing in a car waving a chainsaw, indicating an end to “the political class in the country.” He also criticized Pope Francis (who is of Argentine origin and highly respected in the country), and Milley described him as “a representative of the most harmful thing on earth.” Someone close to him called for severing ties with the Vatican.

The new president, also known as the "Trump of Argentina," has sparked controversy with his positions in favor of the human organ trade and opposition to abortion, while calling for the freedom to carry weapons in the country after crime has risen significantly in recent years.
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