A 2.4 magnitude earthquake near a nuclear testing site in North Korea A 2.4 magnitude earthquake near a nuclear testing site in North Korea

A 2.4 magnitude earthquake near a nuclear testing site in North Korea

A 2.4 magnitude earthquake near a nuclear testing site in North Korea

Yonhap, citing the South Korean Meteorological Agency, said on Thursday that an earthquake measuring 2.4 occurred near a nuclear testing site in North Korea.

The Meteorological Department reported that the quake struck an area 41 kilometers northwest of Kilju, which includes a nuclear testing site.

Yonhap reported that the quake appeared to have occurred due to natural causes.

It is noteworthy that the Kelju area is home to the Bunggi-ri nuclear test site, where North Korea conducted all six of its nuclear tests, and is considered an earthquake-prone area.

Experts say that Kilju's land, as a granitic region, was originally stable but repeated nuclear tests may have made it unstable.



Former Japanese Prime Minister: Taiwan may become the next "broken window" after Ukraine and Gaza

Former Japanese Prime Minister: Taiwan may become the next "broken window" after Ukraine and Gaza

Former Japanese Prime Minister Taro Aso considered that Taiwan may become the next "broken window" after Ukraine and the Gaza Strip, in reference to the potential dangers of conflict in the region in the absence of a peace settlement.

According to the Nikkei Asia newspaper, Aso said in a speech he delivered at the Center for Presidential and Congressional Studies in Washington on Wednesday: “Dr. George Keeling, an American criminologist, proposed the “broken windows” theory. The theory states that if a single broken window is not repaired "More windows will be broken, and eventually the entire city will be destroyed."

He continued: "We must now look to Taiwan as the next window that may be smashed."

However, Aso, who serves as vice-chairman of Japan's ruling Liberal Democratic Party, expressed his hope for a peaceful solution to the situation around Taiwan and a constructive dialogue between Beijing and Taipei, warning that resolving the issue through military means "will only disrupt the international order." .

Aso visited Taiwan last August, where he said that Japan, the United States and Taiwan must be prepared to use deterrence to maintain peace and stability in the Taiwan Strait.

Aso's statements and his trip to Taiwan caused a sharp reaction from Beijing , as the Chinese authorities submitted a protest to the Japanese government, stressing that the words of the former Japanese prime minister encouraged the militarization of the region.

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