For the first time a joint Russian-Chinese experience in using a quantum communications satellite For the first time a joint Russian-Chinese experience in using a quantum communications satellite

For the first time a joint Russian-Chinese experience in using a quantum communications satellite

For the first time a joint Russian-Chinese experience in using a quantum communications satellite

Chinese and Russian scientists have used a Chinese satellite for quantum communications over long distances for the first time.

Director of the Institute of Physics and Quantum Engineering at the Russian Construction Engineering University Alexei Fedorov noted that quantum encryption via satellite provides new opportunities to protect data received from facilities located at a great distance.

Russian and Chinese physicists conducted a joint experiment on using the Chinese Mo-Tzu quantum communications satellite to quantum transfer encryption keys over a distance of approximately 3,800 kilometers and exchange messages and images via a protected communication channel. To ensure its operation, the first ground station for quantum communications via satellite was built in the Russian city of Zvenigorod, the press service of the Russian Construction Engineering University reported.

Director of the Institute of Physics and Quantum Engineering at the university, Alexei Fyodorov, said, “Thanks to the efforts of a team of scientists and engineers, a unique receiving station was created, which allows stable communications with the satellite, as well as decoding the polarization states of single photons sent from it. The satellite’s quantum encryption opens.” "New opportunities to protect data received from facilities located at a great distance."

Fedorov and his colleagues pointed out that one of the main problems in the operation of modern quantum communication systems is that light gradually fades as it travels through optical fibers. For this reason, the distance between nodes of the quantum network is currently no more than several hundred kilometers when using terrestrial data transmission systems.

It has become possible to increase the distance of sending quantum information by exchanging data not only through terrestrial fiber optic cables, but also through communications satellites. In particular, in September 2016, Chinese scientists launched the Mo Tzu orbital satellite and successfully used it to conduct the first "intercontinental" communications to transfer quantum information. Since 2019, physicists from the Russian Construction Engineering University, the Russian Quantum Center and the Russian startup QSpace have joined this project.

Russian scientists recently completed the development of the first local ground communications station that allows establishing a connection with the Mo-Tzu satellite, and exchanging with it a group of individual photons and light particles, in polarization states in which the transmitted information is encrypted. This communications station was deployed in the city of Zvenigorod in the Moscow region, where the researchers were able to contact their Chinese colleagues.

Through this communication session, the researchers exchanged encryption keys, as well as text messages and encrypted images measuring 256 x 64 pixels, and comprehensively studied the security level of all components of quantum space communication systems. According to physicists, this once again confirmed the possibility of using Mo-Tzu to conduct quantum communication sessions over very long distances and demonstrated Russia's ability to use such systems.


A cybersecurity expert warns of a new “trend” on Instagram that threatens to steal your personal information

A cybersecurity expert warns of a new “trend” on Instagram that threatens to steal your personal information

A new trend has spread on Instagram in which users share their answers to 11 questions, including age, height, date of birth, and other questions about phobias, for example.

Although this may seem innocent, a cybersecurity expert warned that the “Get to Know Me” trend may give hackers an opportunity to defraud users, because many of them use the exact answers from the trend. As passwords in various areas, from online banking to email and credit card sites.

Cyber ​​risk and strategic analyst Ileana Shiloh posted a video clip on TikTok warning her followers of the “Get to Know Me” trend and alerting them to the need to delete posts and videos related to this trend immediately.

“I'm not going to lie, I almost fell victim to this,” she noted in the video. While identifying her phobias, Shiloh said she paused and realized some of the questions were answers to many of her security questions.

She quickly posted a video on TikTok asking everyone to delete this post immediately.

But she faced skepticism from her followers who dismissed her concerns, saying their answers had nothing to do with their passwords or security questions.

In response, Shiloh posted a video explaining why providing a list of your personal information online is dangerous, in which she said: “By using your date of birth, they can learn many things about you and use that information to access some of your accounts.”

Although this trend was initially published via Instagram Stories, which disappear after 24 hours, many users reposted it on TikTok using the hashtag #GettoKnowMe, making it a quick and easy way for hackers and scammers to find personal details. Individuality.

The UK Ministry of Justice supports Shiloh's warning, advising everyone to "think before posting anything online or sharing information in emails", bearing in mind that sharing information with people you don't know is one of the biggest risks online.

Likewise, the National Cybersecurity Alliance warns against sharing personal information with anyone, explaining: “Many people take internet security lightly. They share their private data willingly and without any concerns at all. The first line of defense for your personal data is you. If If you share your personal information online, you risk it being leaked once the company you shared the data with is hacked.”

Previous Post Next Post