Scientists are developing electrodes that monitor the functioning of nerves in the brain Scientists are developing electrodes that monitor the functioning of nerves in the brain

Scientists are developing electrodes that monitor the functioning of nerves in the brain

Scientists are developing electrodes that monitor the functioning of nerves in the brain

Neurophysiologists are developing electrodes that will enable them to monitor the brain function of epilepsy patients outside hospitals.
American biotechnologists have developed a new type of flexible electrodes that allow monitoring the work of 128 neurons located deep in the brain. These devices will allow neuroscientists to monitor the brain function of epilepsy patients outside hospitals. This was reported by the press service of the University of California, San Diego.

The university’s press service quoted Shadi Dayey, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, as saying: “We are now focusing on using this technology to monitor the brains of patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy. Our ultimate goal is to make this development by 2026 that allows us to conduct wireless observations of neuronal activity.” "In the brains of patients in hospitals first, and then at home for a very long time."

It is noteworthy that the developed electrodes are very thin strips made of several layers of polymer, and between them there are other electrically conductive layers made of gold and chromium alloys, as well as platinum and silver. These metal structures connect to neurons through a series of special holes in the polymeric membrane, allowing each electrode to interact with extreme precision with only a small number of neurons.

As experiments conducted by scientists have shown, these structures have a very high level of flexibility and strength, which makes it possible to “print” electrodes up to 15 centimeters long based on current methods used in the manufacture of semiconductors and implant them in the deep layers of the brain. Experiments conducted by scientists on pigs and other animals showed that the new electrodes are able to read signals coming from 128 different cells simultaneously.

The scientists tested the performance of the electrodes they made in experiments that included two volunteers undergoing surgery to remove tumors from the brain. The scientists implanted the devices they made deep into the brains of the experiment participants, allowing them to read signals coming from a large number of single neurons located in the cortex and in the deep layers of the parietal and temporal lobes of the brain.

The researchers hope that their development in the near future will help neurophysiologists study the mechanisms of development of epileptic seizures, as well as other disorders in the functioning of the nervous system. Professor Daye pointed out that these electrodes can be used to combat similar disorders in the functioning of the nervous system, and they can also be used not only to read nerve impulses but also to control the work of individual neurons.



US Special Forces are testing new water robots

Navy Recognition reported that US Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) conducted tests on new military water robots.

According to the information provided by the site, the new K4 MANTA water robots that the United States is testing are unmanned vehicles that can work on the surface of the water or dive. They are designed to be able to move quickly over long distances on the surface and then dive to carry out secret operations, and they can be relied upon for missions. Reconnaissance, water surveillance, and electronic warfare operations, and they can also be used as water strike drones.

The bodies of these robots were manufactured using special carbon composites, and were designed to have a small radar and thermal signature, making them difficult to detect by enemy radars. They can also transport payloads weighing up to 5 tons, and operate independently for up to 10 days.

These robots are designed to be easily transported and launched from various types of ships and boats. They can also be transported in special containers on board C-130 aircraft, and are equipped with various types of munitions and sensor equipment, including other water drone exploration systems, sonar devices, and sound buoys.

The largest version of MANTA is 16.5 meters long and 5 meters wide, and can move at a speed of 60 nautical knots on the surface of the water, move at a speed of 10 knots underwater, dive to a depth of 30 meters, and travel 1,000 nautical miles on each mission.
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