Satellites contribute to solving the mystery of the Egyptian pyramids Satellites contribute to solving the mystery of the Egyptian pyramids

Satellites contribute to solving the mystery of the Egyptian pyramids

Satellites contribute to solving the mystery of the Egyptian pyramids

Scientists are trying to solve the mystery of building the Egyptian pyramids. Today, these imposing structures are surrounded by barren desert, but in ancient times a huge stream ran alongside them.

Satellite images helped solve this mystery, as they revealed the existence of an ancient branch of the Nile River, hundreds of meters wide and extending 100 km, that used to pass through the Giza region, but over time it dried up and disappeared.

IFLScience indicates that the effects of the “Pyramids” branch, which extends 100 km, were discovered by a satellite. It is not unlikely that the ancients used it to transport building materials to the area where the pyramids were built in nearby Giza, which contains 38 known pyramids.

The researchers plan to study the soil in the dry river branch area.



"Master of Disguise" a poisonous blue dragon appears on the beaches of Texas

Marine biologists have warned of the appearance of large numbers of a rare, poisonous marine creature on the beaches of Texas, USA.

Jess Tunnell, a marine conservationist who produces the Harte Research Institute's "Beachcombing" series examining the Gulf of Mexico, discovered the dangerous blue dragons, known as a type of sea slug, along North Padre Island, south of Corpus Christi. In Texas.

These unusual creatures, officially known as Glaucus atlanticus, feed on the toxins of a jellyfish-like animal.

Scientists warned people against touching the "blue dragon", while publishing pictures of it.

The institute also said: “When touched, these creatures can release powerful sting cells.”

Tunnell explained to the Daily Mail website: “If someone is bitten by a blue dragon, he will suffer from severe pain for about an hour. The affected person may suffer from nausea and a feeling as if needles are being inserted into the skin.”

Despite their bright blue colors, spotting these creatures can be difficult due to their identification with the blue of the ocean and sky, which makes dragons a “master of disguise,” according to Australian marine ecologist, Dr. Steve Smith.

In a February 12 advisory post on Facebook, scientists at the Harte Research Institute warned Texans to expect more of these venomous little creatures along their coasts during the spring.

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