Scientists are studying the mechanism of transforming massive stars into black holes Scientists are studying the mechanism of transforming massive stars into black holes

Scientists are studying the mechanism of transforming massive stars into black holes

Scientists are studying the mechanism of transforming massive stars into black holes
-
Astronomers have ruled out the possibility of "neutrino acceleration" caused by newborn black holes.

Scientists made this discovery while studying data collected during observations of the binary star system FTS 243, located in the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy adjacent to the Milky Way.

Astronomers also discovered two years ago that a “large star and a sleeping hole” were hiding inside this star system, and the star’s mass is 25 times greater than the mass of the sun.

The first evidence was discovered that the direct transformation of a massive star into a black hole did not lead to the formation of asymmetric neutrino emissions that would have greatly accelerated the motion of the newborn black hole and its potential moons.

Daniel Kress, a researcher at the German Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE), explained: “The black hole in the binary system VFTS 243 allowed us for the first time to study the physical processes that occur in the interior of large collapsed stars.”

The absence of any visible signs of activity in this black hole, as well as the supernova remnant in the vicinity of VFTS 243, has led astronomers to believe that the object arose as a result of a so-called “failed” supernova, a direct gravitational collapse into a black hole. The researchers verified whether this was indeed the case, calculating different scenarios for the death of its birth star and trying to reproduce the current structure of VFTS 243.

Calculations confirmed that the black hole actually arose as a result of the direct gravitational collapse of the star, whose core was about 10 times heavier than the total mass of the Sun. Scientists did not find any evidence that the black hole was subjected to a so-called "aftershock", which is a sharp increase in the speed of movement associated with the uneven nature of the emissions of neutrino particles arising during the collapse of the star.

Such computational results, as noted by Chris and other researchers, confirm the hypothesis of some theoretical astrophysicists, according to which the motion of the black hole and its aftershocks is absent or very weak after the explosions of failed novae.

The researchers concluded that this makes it possible to distinguish between inactive black holes, neutron stars and other compact celestial bodies, the formation of which during the gravitational collapse of stars is often accompanied by "postnatal shock."

1 Comments

Previous Post Next Post

Worldwide News Search HereπŸ‘‡