Similar to leeches, developing a method for taking blood samples without the pain of acupuncture Similar to leeches, developing a method for taking blood samples without the pain of acupuncture

Similar to leeches, developing a method for taking blood samples without the pain of acupuncture

Similar to leeches, developing a method for taking blood samples without the pain of acupuncture

Scientists have developed a device that can draw blood samples by using fine needles and a suction cup instead of a large needle, an invention inspired by leeches.

Because many individuals feel uncomfortable seeing needles penetrating their arms to obtain blood samples, doctors may resort to areas such as pricking the tip of a finger or earlobe to obtain blood.

However, this method does not provide enough blood for diagnostic tests.

Therefore, the new device proposes a solution for taking blood samples in a way that works according to the leech principle, which is a method that is less invasive than a needle and easier to handle.

Scientists at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH Zurich), who created the device, say it can be used even without medical training.

The team noted in a statement that although the new device cannot collect an amount of blood like a needle, it can collect much more than a finger prick. This makes diagnostic measurements more reliable, and this method carries a significantly reduced risk of infection.

The statement indicated that scientists were initially developing a suction cup that would transport the drug to the blood through the mucous membrane lining the inside of the mouth. They soon realized that this could be suitable for another use.

“For this project, we actually studied leeches that attach to their host with a sucker,” said David Klein, a doctoral student in the group led by Jean-Christophe Leroux, professor of drug synthesis and delivery at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich. “We realized that we could develop a similar blood collection system.” ".

In reference to the way leeches work, they stick to the host's skin and suck blood from the affected area with their teeth, creating negative pressure through swallowing.

The microneedle suction device works similarly to a leech. A two and a half centimeter long suction cup is attached to the patient's arm or back. Fine needles are placed inside the cup, and when pressed, they puncture the skin.

Within a few minutes, the negative pressure inside the suction cup ensures that an ample amount of blood is collected for diagnostic testing.

The suction cup is made of silicone, while the fine needles attached to it are made of steel. In addition, microneedles are installed inside the suction cup, reducing the risk of injury during penetration.

Nicole Zoratto, a postdoctoral researcher in Dr. Leroux's group and leader of the research team, envisions the future use of this device in low-income areas, especially in sub-Saharan Africa.

It can help combat tropical diseases such as malaria.

An important advantage of the new device is that the fine needles are located inside the suction cup, which reduces the risk of infection during application and after disposal compared to taking blood samples with traditional needles.

The device has been tested on pigs so far, and scientists believe that the composition of the materials may need further improvement before testing it on humans.

The research paper for this invention was published in the journal Advanced Science.

6 Comments

  1. Leeches feeding on our blood for using blood sample

    ReplyDelete
  2. A new device inspired by leeches collects blood samples without the pain of large needles, using fine needles and a suction cup, reducing the risk of infection.





    ReplyDelete
  3. Papia Mukherjee10 May 2024 at 15:22

    Wonder to know

    ReplyDelete
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