A young man with complete paralysis writes a novel using only his eyes! A young man with complete paralysis writes a novel using only his eyes!

A young man with complete paralysis writes a novel using only his eyes!

A young man with complete paralysis writes a novel using only his eyes!

A young man suffering from complete paralysis resulting from "locked-in syndrome" was able to write a 50,000-word book using only his eyes.

Howard Weeks, from Dartmouth in Devon, suffered a devastating stroke as a teenager in 2011, leaving him virtually locked in his own body, unable to move independently or communicate fully.

Now 29, Weeks can think, see and feel, but he cannot eat, speak or move any part of his body except his eyes.

The rare neurological condition, known as locked-in syndrome, made all physical activity or function "impossible" and prevented Weeks from communicating normally.

This disorder is very rare and develops in less than 1% of stroke survivors, according to the Stroke Charity. But using the Eyegaze Computer, a device that tracks his eye movements, Weeks amazingly wrote a novel over the course of 18 months.

He said on the Eyegaze program: “I enjoyed writing the novel, especially the parts that I personally enjoyed living myself,” adding: “The first chapter presents to the reader my life before the stroke, which allows him to understand who I am. The book concludes with my transition from the hospital environment to community life. The series extends From the age of 16 to the present day.”

Locked-in syndrome is caused by damage to the brainstem, which contains nerves that carry information to other parts of the body. This damage is usually caused by lack of blood flow or bleeding after a serious physical trauma.

Some people with locked-in syndrome are able to move more parts of the body than others. However, there is currently no treatment for this condition.

Many patients are confined to their beds, require constant care, and cannot breathe, eat or drink except through special medical tubes.

Treatment focuses on helping the patient develop any small voluntary actions available to him, such as finger movement, swallowing, and making sounds.

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