With Turkish mediation Talks between Somalia and Ethiopia and agreement on a second round in September With Turkish mediation Talks between Somalia and Ethiopia and agreement on a second round in September

With Turkish mediation Talks between Somalia and Ethiopia and agreement on a second round in September

With Turkish mediation Talks between Somalia and Ethiopia and agreement on a second round in September

Turkish Foreign Minister Hakan Fidan confirmed that progress has been made in talks between Ethiopian Foreign Minister Taye Atsek Selassie and his Somali counterpart Ahmed Moalim Faki, regarding an agreement signed by Addis Ababa with the breakaway region of Somaliland regarding a port.

Fidan expressed his happiness to be with his counterparts from Ethiopia and Somalia, and stated that Turkey played a facilitating role in this issue through its deep relations and extensive cooperation with Ethiopia and Somalia.

The Turkish Foreign Ministry said in a statement that Minister Fidan hosted his Ethiopian and Somali counterparts in Ankara, adding that the three ministers signed a joint statement after "frank, friendly and forward-looking" talks on resolving differences between the two countries.

The ministry added in its statement that the Somali and Ethiopian ministers discussed ways to resolve differences between the two countries "within a framework acceptable to both parties," and agreed to hold another round of talks in Ankara on September 2.

The two ministers affirmed their commitment to a peaceful solution to resolve the differences between the two countries, and expressed their appreciation to Turkey for the mediation it provided, and their appreciation to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan for this initiative.

Relations between the two neighbouring countries have deteriorated since Ethiopia signed an agreement with the Somaliland region on January 1, 2023, granting Addis Ababa permission to use the region's Red Sea coast for commercial and military purposes.

Somalia rejected Ethiopia's deal with Somaliland, describing it as "illegitimate, a threat to good neighbourliness and a violation of its sovereignty", and recalled its ambassador to Ethiopia following the announcement of the agreement.

The Ethiopian government defended the deal, saying it "will not affect any party or country."

Ethiopia lost its Red Sea ports in the early 1990s after the Eritrean War of Independence that lasted from 1961 until Eritrea's independence in 1991.

The Somaliland region, which has not enjoyed official recognition since it declared its secession from Somalia in 1991, acts as an independent entity administratively, politically and security-wise, with the central government unable to extend its control over the region, or its leadership able to gain independence.

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