Garbage, mice, and a situation that drives crazy What did the Syrians' deportation centers in Denmark look like?

Garbage, mice, and a situation that drives crazy What did the Syrians' deportation centers in Denmark look like?  Denmark is detaining a number of Syrian refugees who are threatened with deportation to their country in harsh conditions, and places filled with waste and mice, which has pushed one of the detainees to a state close to insanity, according to the New York Times.  The New York Times published a long report on the situation of Syrian refugees in Denmark who are being held in deportation centers, after the Danish authorities rejected their asylum requests, claiming that their country had become safe and they could return to it.  Detainees suffer harsh conditions in deportation centers, and some of them stayed there for a long period of more than 6 months, while the newspaper quoted relatives of one of the detainees as saying that he is suffering from depression, loss of appetite and involuntary convulsions, and has started talking to himself.  The newspaper visited one of this deportation center and said that it was full of rubbish, while mice were scattered in another center, according to the pictures taken by the newspaper.  With the arrival of hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees to Europe in 2015, Denmark took in more than 30,000, the newspaper said, adding: "No European country has tried to make Syrians feel that they are unwelcome people like Denmark."  Since 2019, the Danish government has sent letters to more than 1,200 people who came from Syria (Damascus region) saying that it has reconsidered the residency granted to them, and since that time has withdrawn the temporary residency of at least 100 people, and their residence in Denmark has become illegal.  A number of Syrians have been sent to deportation centers set up across the country, but Denmark cannot deport them due to the lack of diplomatic relations with Syria.  Dozens of these refugees, who until recently held official residency, ended up in an unknown situation and face permanent detention and the threat of deportation.

Denmark is detaining a number of Syrian refugees who are threatened with deportation to their country in harsh conditions, and places filled with waste and mice, which has pushed one of the detainees to a state close to insanity, according to the New York Times.

The New York Times published a long report on the situation of Syrian refugees in Denmark who are being held in deportation centers, after the Danish authorities rejected their asylum requests, claiming that their country had become safe and they could return to it.

Detainees suffer harsh conditions in deportation centers, and some of them stayed there for a long period of more than 6 months, while the newspaper quoted relatives of one of the detainees as saying that he is suffering from depression, loss of appetite and involuntary convulsions, and has started talking to himself.

The newspaper visited one of this deportation center and said that it was full of rubbish, while mice were scattered in another center, according to the pictures taken by the newspaper.

With the arrival of hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees to Europe in 2015, Denmark took in more than 30,000, the newspaper said, adding: "No European country has tried to make Syrians feel that they are unwelcome people like Denmark."

Since 2019, the Danish government has sent letters to more than 1,200 people who came from Syria (Damascus region) saying that it has reconsidered the residency granted to them, and since that time has withdrawn the temporary residency of at least 100 people, and their residence in Denmark has become illegal.

A number of Syrians have been sent to deportation centers set up across the country, but Denmark cannot deport them due to the lack of diplomatic relations with Syria.

Dozens of these refugees, who until recently held official residency, ended up in an unknown situation and face permanent detention and the threat of deportation.

CIA: China is uncomfortable with Russia's difficulties in Ukraine  US officials believe that China has begun to feel uneasy about Russia's difficulties since it announced the start of a military operation against Ukraine. In addition to the remarkable rapprochement that resulted from the war between the United States and European countries  The Director of the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) on Tuesday expressed his belief that Chinese President Xi Jinping feels "uncomfortable" with the difficulties that Russia is facing, since the start of the military operation against Ukraine, and about the resulting rapprochement between the United States and Europe as a result of the war.  "I think President Xi and the Chinese leadership are feeling a bit uneasy about what's going on in Ukraine," CIA Director William Burns said during a congressional hearing on the global risk assessment of the conflict in Ukraine.  He pointed out that neither the Chinese president nor the Chinese leadership expected the great difficulties facing the Russians.  Earlier, the Pentagon talked about the many difficulties facing the Russian forces in Ukraine, with the military operation entering its second week, and estimated the casualties among these forces at about four thousand dead.  China was not among those condemning the Russian military attack on Ukraine, as Moscow is its close ally, and confirmed this in an official statement Monday, stressing the "strength" of the friendship that binds it with Moscow despite international condemnations of the Russian attack.  At the same time, Beijing was open to mediating an end to the war. On Tuesday, during a video summit with his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Olaf Scholz, the Chinese president urged "the utmost restraint" in the Ukraine conflict, describing the crisis as "extremely worrying."  In the same context, Xi said he wants the Russian and Ukrainian sides to maintain the momentum of negotiations, overcome difficulties and continue talks so as to achieve results.  "The Chinese leadership is concerned about the damage it could do to its reputation from its close cooperation with Russian President Vladimir Putin," Burns, a veteran diplomat and former US ambassador to Moscow, told the hearing.  "Beijing is concerned about the economic fallout from its close alliance with Moscow," Burns said, at a time when Beijing is recording one of its lowest growth rates in the past three decades.  Meanwhile, the CIA director emphasized that China is also concerned about the broader geopolitical ramifications of the Russian invasion, including the way Putin has brought the Europeans and Americans closer.

CIA: China is uncomfortable with Russia's difficulties in Ukraine


US officials believe that China has begun to feel uneasy about Russia's difficulties since it announced the start of a military operation against Ukraine. In addition to the remarkable rapprochement that resulted from the war between the United States and European countries

The Director of the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) on Tuesday expressed his belief that Chinese President Xi Jinping feels "uncomfortable" with the difficulties that Russia is facing, since the start of the military operation against Ukraine, and about the resulting rapprochement between the United States and Europe as a result of the war.

"I think President Xi and the Chinese leadership are feeling a bit uneasy about what's going on in Ukraine," CIA Director William Burns said during a congressional hearing on the global risk assessment of the conflict in Ukraine.

He pointed out that neither the Chinese president nor the Chinese leadership expected the great difficulties facing the Russians.

Earlier, the Pentagon talked about the many difficulties facing the Russian forces in Ukraine, with the military operation entering its second week, and estimated the casualties among these forces at about four thousand dead.

China was not among those condemning the Russian military attack on Ukraine, as Moscow is its close ally, and confirmed this in an official statement Monday, stressing the "strength" of the friendship that binds it with Moscow despite international condemnations of the Russian attack.

At the same time, Beijing was open to mediating an end to the war.
On Tuesday, during a video summit with his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Olaf Scholz, the Chinese president urged "the utmost restraint" in the Ukraine conflict, describing the crisis as "extremely worrying."

In the same context, Xi said he wants the Russian and Ukrainian sides to maintain the momentum of negotiations, overcome difficulties and continue talks so as to achieve results.

"The Chinese leadership is concerned about the damage it could do to its reputation from its close cooperation with Russian President Vladimir Putin," Burns, a veteran diplomat and former US ambassador to Moscow, told the hearing.

"Beijing is concerned about the economic fallout from its close alliance with Moscow," Burns said, at a time when Beijing is recording one of its lowest growth rates in the past three decades.

Meanwhile, the CIA director emphasized that China is also concerned about the broader geopolitical ramifications of the Russian invasion, including the way Putin has brought the Europeans and Americans closer.
Previous Post Next Post