Libya the armed forces withdraw from the entrances to Tripoli and Bashagha: ready for dialogue

Libya the armed forces withdraw from the entrances to Tripoli and Bashagha: ready for dialogue Armed groups loyal to the Libyan Prime Minister-designate of the House of Representatives, Fathi Bashagha, withdrew from the entrances to the capital, Tripoli, in response to international calls for calm and restraint, before the start of dialogue and negotiation.  The Libyan Prime Minister-designate from the House of Representatives, Fathi Bashagha, announced on Friday the withdrawal of the armed groups that gathered in the capital, Tripoli, and its suburbs, to support him against the existing government, in response to calls for calm from the United Nations and Washington.  Bashagha said, "We are ready for any dialogue. We are peace advocates, not war advocates. We assure our people in Tripoli that there will be no wars."  He explained, "The most important task of the new government is to hold presidential and parliamentary elections, and the government of Abdul Hamid al-Dabaiba has expired, and has been stripped of legitimacy from the House of Representatives, and it has become confined to Tripoli and will not be able to hold elections."  Bashagha stressed that his government is a unified government that can hold elections, because it can roam all of Libya and extend its services throughout the country.  He continued, "We are still determined and we are all determined to take over our headquarters in Tripoli, and we will start our work in the capital, and there will be no other parallel government anywhere in Libya."  Yesterday, Thursday, Libyan and international concerns were raised about armed mobilizations between supporters of the Bashaga government and the Dabaiba government in the capital, Tripoli.  Commenting on this, Bashagha’s media office said in a statement issued Thursday night: “We note that the force that headed today to the capital, Tripoli, is a force for security, not for war, and despite the difficult situation, they preferred to stop bloodshed, not use weapons, and return to their former headquarters, provided that the outgoing government stops. About any measures related to closing the airspace or any obstacles that violate the law, and this measure also came in response to the demands of our international and regional friends and at the request of many national figures.  For his part, US Ambassador to Libya Richard Norland wrote in a tweet on Twitter: "This evening I spoke with Parliament-appointed Prime Minister Fathi Bashagha and commended him for his willingness to defuse tension and his endeavor to resolve political differences through negotiation, not force."  He added that he "expressed his appreciation" to Dabaiba for his commitment to "protecting lives" and "his willingness to enter negotiations with the aim of finding a political solution."  Libya is witnessing a state of political division after the inauguration of the House of Representatives in Tobruk Bashagha as the head of a new government, instead of the government of Dabaiba, which refuses to hand over power except to a government that comes through a new elected parliament.  Dabaiba's adherence to the continuation of his government is based on the fact that the Political Dialogue Forum set the term of the transitional executive authority at 18 months, extending until June 24 next.

Armed groups loyal to the Libyan Prime Minister-designate of the House of Representatives, Fathi Bashagha, withdrew from the entrances to the capital, Tripoli, in response to international calls for calm and restraint, before the start of dialogue and negotiation.

The Libyan Prime Minister-designate from the House of Representatives, Fathi Bashagha, announced on Friday the withdrawal of the armed groups that gathered in the capital, Tripoli, and its suburbs, to support him against the existing government, in response to calls for calm from the United Nations and Washington.

Bashagha said, "We are ready for any dialogue. We are peace advocates, not war advocates. We assure our people in Tripoli that there will be no wars."

He explained, "The most important task of the new government is to hold presidential and parliamentary elections, and the government of Abdul Hamid al-Dabaiba has expired, and has been stripped of legitimacy from the House of Representatives, and it has become confined to Tripoli and will not be able to hold elections."

Bashagha stressed that his government is a unified government that can hold elections, because it can roam all of Libya and extend its services throughout the country.

He continued, "We are still determined and we are all determined to take over our headquarters in Tripoli, and we will start our work in the capital, and there will be no other parallel government anywhere in Libya."

Yesterday, Thursday, Libyan and international concerns were raised about armed mobilizations between supporters of the Bashaga government and the Dabaiba government in the capital, Tripoli.

Commenting on this, Bashagha’s media office said in a statement issued Thursday night: “We note that the force that headed today to the capital, Tripoli, is a force for security, not for war, and despite the difficult situation, they preferred to stop bloodshed, not use weapons, and return to their former headquarters, provided that the outgoing government stops. About any measures related to closing the airspace or any obstacles that violate the law, and this measure also came in response to the demands of our international and regional friends and at the request of many national figures.

For his part, US Ambassador to Libya Richard Norland wrote in a tweet on Twitter: "This evening I spoke with Parliament-appointed Prime Minister Fathi Bashagha and commended him for his willingness to defuse tension and his endeavor to resolve political differences through negotiation, not force."

He added that he "expressed his appreciation" to Dabaiba for his commitment to "protecting lives" and "his willingness to enter negotiations with the aim of finding a political solution."

Libya is witnessing a state of political division after the inauguration of the House of Representatives in Tobruk Bashagha as the head of a new government, instead of the government of Dabaiba, which refuses to hand over power except to a government that comes through a new elected parliament.

Dabaiba's adherence to the continuation of his government is based on the fact that the Political Dialogue Forum set the term of the transitional executive authority at 18 months, extending until June 24 next.

Former Zambian President Rupiah Banda has died  Former Zambian President Rupiah Banda died Friday at the age of 85 after a long battle with colon cancer. The announcement was made by his son Andrew.  The fourth leader of the southern African country since its independence from Britain served for three years from 2008, a short tenure marked by economic growth and accusations of corruption.  He held the vice-presidency under Levy Mwanawasa , who succumbed to a stroke. He then took control of his country.  But the seasoned diplomat was then defeated in the 2011 election. Zambia's economy grew during his brief presidency mainly on the back of rising copper prices and a boom in Chinese investment.  He continued the infrastructure work started by his predecessor, building roads, hospitals and schools that the country badly needed. Zambia recorded growth of 7.6% in 2011, down from 6.4% the previous year, for which Banda took credit. He had hoped that the economic upturn would convince voters to keep him in power.  Most of the 17.9 million Zambians, however, have not reaped the benefits of the mining and construction boom. Wealth accumulated in the hands of the few, while accusations of corruption surfaced, tarnishing his reputation.

Former Zambian President Rupiah Banda has died

Former Zambian President Rupiah Banda died Friday at the age of 85 after a long battle with colon cancer. The announcement was made by his son Andrew.

The fourth leader of the southern African country since its independence from Britain served for three years from 2008, a short tenure marked by economic growth and accusations of corruption.

He held the vice-presidency under Levy Mwanawasa , who succumbed to a stroke. He then took control of his country.

But the seasoned diplomat was then defeated in the 2011 election.
Zambia's economy grew during his brief presidency mainly on the back of rising copper prices and a boom in Chinese investment.

He continued the infrastructure work started by his predecessor, building roads, hospitals and schools that the country badly needed.
Zambia recorded growth of 7.6% in 2011, down from 6.4% the previous year, for which Banda took credit. He had hoped that the economic upturn would convince voters to keep him in power.

Most of the 17.9 million Zambians, however, have not reaped the benefits of the mining and construction boom. Wealth accumulated in the hands of the few, while accusations of corruption surfaced, tarnishing his reputation.

A virtual gallery traces the history of Mali A Malian craftsman makes a leather box to store and preserve the ancient manuscripts of Timbuktu  A virtual gallery showcasing the cultural history of Mali has been launched, featuring tens of thousands of ancient manuscripts from Timbuktu.  A treasure of Malian heritage, a legacy of written knowledge and academic excellence in Africa, is now within everyone's reach. A virtual gallery presenting the cultural history of Mali has been launched, with tens of thousands of ancient manuscripts from Timbuktu .  These smuggled documents were saved unlike hundreds of others burned during ** the city's takeover by Islamist groups in 2012.** They bring together centuries of African knowledge and scholarship on subjects ranging from mathematics to astrological charts  "They are at the heart of Mali's heritage and represent the long legacy of written knowledge and academic excellence in Africa ," says Dr Abdel Kader Haidara, a librarian known for smuggling the Timbuktu manuscripts, who also participated. to the project.  Collection Mali Magic The collection, called Mali Magic , was put together by Google , in collaboration with local and international partners. It presents Malian culture beyond manuscripts such as the dance of the Dogon ethnic group , works of art, such as that of the winner Abdoulaye Konaté or an image of the construction of the Great Mosque of Djenné , a site classified as heritage. World Heritage Site about 500 km south of Timbuktu.  For centuries, Timbuktu has been a cultural center on the African continent , as well as an Islamic center of learning. According to Unesco , the city's mosques played a vital role in the spread of Islam in West Africa in the 15th and 16th centuries.  7 years of work The digitization of these manuscripts began with a call to Google by Dr. Abdel Kader Haidara in 2014. He invited the company to travel to Mali to see the famous Timbuktu manuscripts and learn the history of why they were in danger.  Over the past seven years, Mali's traditional rulers, historians and digital archaeologists have worked hard to ensure that ancient manuscripts , some dating back to the 11th century, which contain the country's rich history, be preserved by digitizing them.  Ancient documents were originally written in medieval Arabic, but have been translated into English, French, Spanish and modern Arabic to make them more accessible.

A virtual gallery traces the history of Mali

A Malian craftsman makes a leather box to store and preserve the ancient manuscripts of Timbuktu

A virtual gallery showcasing the cultural history of Mali has been launched, featuring tens of thousands of ancient manuscripts from Timbuktu.

A treasure of Malian heritage, a legacy of written knowledge and academic excellence in Africa, is now within everyone's reach. A virtual gallery presenting the cultural history of Mali has been launched, with tens of thousands of ancient manuscripts from Timbuktu .

These smuggled documents were saved unlike hundreds of others burned during ** the city's takeover by Islamist groups in 2012.** They bring together centuries of African knowledge and scholarship on subjects ranging from mathematics to astrological charts

"They are at the heart of Mali's heritage and represent the long legacy of written knowledge and academic excellence in Africa ," says Dr Abdel Kader Haidara, a librarian known for smuggling the Timbuktu manuscripts, who also participated. to the project.

Collection Mali Magic
The collection, called Mali Magic , was put together by Google , in collaboration with local and international partners. It presents Malian culture beyond manuscripts such as the dance of the Dogon ethnic group , works of art, such as that of the winner Abdoulaye Konaté or an image of the construction of the Great Mosque of Djenné , a site classified as heritage. World Heritage Site about 500 km south of Timbuktu.

For centuries, Timbuktu has been a cultural center on the African continent , as well as an Islamic center of learning. According to Unesco , the city's mosques played a vital role in the spread of Islam in West Africa in the 15th and 16th centuries.

7 years of work
The digitization of these manuscripts began with a call to Google by Dr. Abdel Kader Haidara in 2014. He invited the company to travel to Mali to see the famous Timbuktu manuscripts and learn the history of why they were in danger.

Over the past seven years, Mali's traditional rulers, historians and digital archaeologists have worked hard to ensure that ancient manuscripts , some dating back to the 11th century, which contain the country's rich history, be preserved by digitizing them.

Ancient documents were originally written in medieval Arabic, but have been translated into English, French, Spanish and modern Arabic to make them more accessible.
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